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I sometimes use banana leaves and they do enhance the flavor of the cooked food. I have also used foil when banana is not available. Banana leaves don't have to be boiled, just steamed or run through hot water to make them supple.


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If you can find a local Asian or Mexican specialty food store, you'll be more likely to find them, though they may be in the frozen section. Part of the uniqueness of these leaves is that they impart a slight flavor to the food cooked in them. People in the tropics use these huge leaves to line cooking pits and to wrap everything from pigs to rice. The ...


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Okay, all these answers have strange spellings, it should be spelt Hoisin sauce, and should say 海鲜酱 on the bottle, it means "Seafood sauce" though contains no seafood, it's about 50% sugar. In Australia this is what you'll find in restaurants, and you'll be able to find the Lee Kum Kee brand at Chinese shops, and probably also in Coles: Actually, ...


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It is true that traditionally Peking Duck is eaten with Hoison Sauce or Duck Sauce, however based on your description it doesn't sound like either of these. Hoisin Sauce is really thick, and Duck Sauce isn't a dark color. However I know that a lot of Chinese restaurants have special base brown sauce they use by combining (different ratios for different ...


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My grandson adores duck pancakes so I tend to buy Sweet Hoisen Sauce in a squeezy bottle from the Asian supermarket. However, assuming this isn't easily available you can take any shop bought Duck / Hoisen sauce and customise although they tend to be very strong. I find mixing in some runny honey works best to counteract the strength. Ideally, heat a ...


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While the some of the other answers point to liquid smoke or actual smoke, I would suggest that the flavour doesn't primarily come from the smoke generated by the fire/stove, but by the wok, the oil and technique itself. Real smoke penetration is a inherently slow process. Stir frying is an extremely fast process. On one of those woks as pictured in your ...


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In America that sauce is hoisin sauce or possibly (very much less likely) duck sauce or plum sauce. Any of these can be found for purchase easily, or they can be made from scratch.


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Another, non-commercial option is to add a bit of strong coffee. I learned that trick making chili-con-carne. You wont have to buy it in, and it will not add a strong additional taste like smoked paprika (which will alter the taste of your dish quite substantially...). Now, if you like the taste of paprika, you can use fresh sweet peppers, roast them in ...


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Another option is Smoked Paprika. As Jolene wisely cautions, those liquid smoke products are very strong. And even though it might be "natural" smoke flavor, it can lend a "synthetic" taste to delicate foods. Smoked Paprika has a much more subtle smokiness. Of course, it will also add color and additional flavor of its own. It sounds to me like this would ...


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I would suggest either using a commercially available liquid smoke product added after the stir-frying stage. The proper proportion would require some experimentation. Or you could try using a stove top smoker to smoke the meat & (dried) noodles beforehand, (perhaps something par-cooked similarly to the way instant ramen noodles are so there is fat in ...


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To add smoky flavor, you can add a drop of liquid smoke. Do it drop by drop - be careful, it's easy to use too much and not be able to taste anything else. Liquid smoke is actually made by distilling smoke and it really does add a flavor much like putting the food in a smoker (or a big fire).


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Asia invented noodles and everyone has been playing with the recipe for thousands of years. Here in louisiana every region and even every household has a different gumbo recipe... Noodles are kinda the same, all across Asia there are a thousand different recipes with hundreds of different noodle recipes. In short, try it out and see if you like it. Happy ...


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In America's Test Kitchen's recipe for Hot and Sour Soup (sorry, paywalled), they call for 5 tablespoons black Chinese vinegar or 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar plus 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar. So a 50/50 mix of both vinegars for more than twice the amount of Chinkiang vinegar. I have made Hot and Sour Soup with Chinkiang and with the red wine and balsamic ...


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I believe Balsamic vinegar is going to be your closest match in color and taste unless you happen to have date vinegar in your pantry. Balsamic is pretty common in every home though.



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