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8

As a rule of thumb that would pretty much coincide with what JustRightMenus said: green asparagus is generally not peeled, but white asparagus should definitely be peeled. I think it's the same plant, just cultivated in a different way. (And interestingly, in Germany and the Netherlands, the green stuff is much less common, whereas in North America I've ...


7

In a cup with water. You place them straight up in a small cup with a little water. Just like you would if you were storing flowers. You'll want to store this in your chill chest on the top most rack; to avoid any cross contamination from other possible food products (chicken, etc). You may want to leave the rubber band on to allow it to stay tidy. If you ...


7

Yes, there is a difference in taste. I think it's the chlorophyll, but I may be wrong. But the green asparagus has a "vegetable" or "grassy" taste which isn't present in the white asparagus. The white one has its own distinct aroma, which is less pronounced in the green one. As for texture, Caleb already said it. White asparagus is more tender, if you buy ...


5

You have two delicious choices. Both require a bed of coals, so I'll start with that. You'll need to build a fire with the logs stacked 'log cabin' style, and let the fire burn down to coals. You want a deep red coal, just starting to darken on top. The coals should look something like this. You can bake, or bbq the chicken and asparagus. Both are ...


4

It's best to use them the day you bought them, but this isn't always possible. The best way of storing them is putting them in a wet towel, and putting the towel+asparagus in your refrigerator. But really, try to use them as fast as you can. I don't think they can last really long (more than two weeks) like that. If they were in the fridge for a couple of ...


4

Don't really like to define one vegtable as better than another, but Asparagus has always had a reputation as a luxury item. A combination of the expense of producing it (You cannot get a high yield, plus it takes a number of years to develop a productive asparagus bed) and a relatively short season (At least in the UK) meant it would be a rare treat for ...


4

I've heard the same recommendation before - the idea is that if asparagus is very thick (say, 1/2 inch or more in diameter), and if the bottom is much thicker than the top of the spear, then peeling it will help it to cook more evenly. If you have particularly thick asparagus that seem tough, you may want to peel the bottom section. First, chop or snap off ...


4

My grandmother used to peel her asparagus (the thick-stalked ones) so that it would cook up tenderly and look pretty on her platters. She used to peel her celery, as well (apparently because she believed that thick celery skin was bad for the digestion in addition to being ugly. I've seen similar ideas in some of my old cookbooks). In several of my old ...


4

Martha's Vinyard Magazine suggests that the diamater of the stalks is not directly related to their age as one might suspect: Some might assume thinner spears are younger and therefore more tender. The diameter, however, has more to do with the age of the plant itself and the particular asparagus variety. They go on to cite Cook's Illustrated, ...


4

The most important thing is to cook over open coals not over open flame. You'll get more even heat and no sooty smoke. Just build up a fire with some good-size pieces of wood and let it burn down so the flames are gone and you're left with a nice set of red-hot coals. Then start cooking. At this point, theoretically, it's just like cooking over charcoal ...


3

Both green and white asparagus are the same variety of asparagus. Farmers cover the white asparagus with little shades to prevent the sun from hitting it, and this keeps the asparagus white. Left to its own, asparagus will turn green and eventually get stringy and tough. Young asparagus, though, can be quite tender. White asparagus is always pretty young; ...


3

I sometimes steam asparagus before sautéing on a high heat with some lemon juice to get some caramelization on the outside of the asparagus. You could adapt this idea to the grill by sealing the asparagus in tin foil with a little water and steaming for four minutes (for finger thick spears). Then give them a bit of colour by placing them directly over the ...


2

I certainly don't know why asparagus is so beloved in Germany, but here in Croatia it's one of the less used vegetables so it's definitely not a global phenomenon. I suspect it has to do with culture and what grows best in certain cultures. To give another example, I guess that most people in Italy would call tomato a king of vegetables, if it were a ...


2

I've never heard of asparagus being "the king of vegetables". This article (and the articles that preceded it) may cast some light on why asparagus is not so commonly eaten. According to the article, "This allergy is well-known in Germany, especially when dealing with young asparagus shoots." Here is a quote from the first article in the series: "Now when ...


2

Asparagus is delicious! In North America it is certainly not the phenomenon that it is in parts of Europe, but its popularity is on the rise (I worked in a grocery store for many years....). We have only been getting the white variety (which is just the green variety grown with soil mounded over it so it is never exposed to sunlight) for the last few years. ...


2

I would not recommend using the microwave for two reasons: It does not scale up well as you add mass to the cooking chamber The shape and size of asparagus is almost designed to fit into the fact that microwave ovens tend to cook unevenly Instead, if you wish to cook a large amount of asparagus in a reasonably short period of time, I recommend roasting. ...


2

Advantages of glass: you can see the product....the container does not pick up any flavor or color from the product...other than that, in this case (refrigerator pickle) there is no reason not to use your plastic. In fact, the only reason to use glass, that I can think of, is if you we going to can your pickles for extended shelf life. Then, of course, ...


1

Per the Clemson University Extension: Can I ferment pickles in a new plastic garbage can? The plastic needs to be food-grade. Pickles and sauerkraut can be fermented in large stoneware crocks, large glass jars or food-grade plastic containers. Since fermenting is usually longer term and very acidic, and since many food products are sold in ...


1

The other difference is that green asparagus (in my experience anyway) is more robust. You can stirfry it, BBQ it, grill it, roast it or steam it, and it will retain its shape and flavour. Perhaps this is because I never peel green asparagus and always peel the white version - perhaps the outer layer helps to hold everything together for the rougher ...


1

Normally, I just snap off the woody ends, but if the asparagus is particularly thick I will slice it length-wise on a diagonal. It all comes down to preference, and which is more labor-intensive. In general, I disagree with peeling fruits and vegetables because so many vitamins and good-for-you stuff are in the peels!



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