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37

I might disagree a little with rumtscho - traditionally cured bacon is one thing, what you get in packets from the supermarket is another. It looks similar and it tastes similar, but commercial products are processed rapidly and not tested for immediate consumption without cooking. Products like Parma ham and Schwartzwaldschinken are proven to be adequately ...


29

In such a case, for any food item, ask yourself a question: In a 19th century household, would it have been kept in the cellar, or eaten immediately? For bacon, it is common knowledge (or at least I think everybody knows it) that it was kept in a cellar for long time. So this is definitely not a food which perishes too quickly. You can eat it raw. (In ...


24

My wife loves bacon that's cooked to the cusp of burning, so I've got a good knowledge of the properties of bacon on that fine line. It's so brittle, you can powder it very easily. I myself would probably just stick it in a plastic bag, and whack it a few times with a pan, but I don't see any reason why you couldn't put it in the blender. I have a nice ...


15

I've always cooked it on top of aluminum foil, at 350°F (~175°C) for 20 minutes. Flipping it once at about the half way point. If you prefer crispier, go for 25 minutes.


15

In my experience, you'll get the best bacon if you start with a cold pan. Throwing it onto a hot pan sounds impressive (it sizzles right away), but it will also make the bacon shrink/curl up much more and faster. I cook bacon half by look, and half by sound. After you cook it a couple times you'll see (hear) what I mean - the sizzle changes significantly ...


14

I render off the necessary fat over low heat, then remove the bacon strips, increase the heat, and fry using the rendered fat. When nearly done, I return the bacon to the pan to crisp it before serving. Of course, you could also just save the grease from one batch to use with the next, thereby ensuring you always have both fresh-cooked bacon and ...


13

Bacon and pancetta are both made from pork bellies; the difference between them lies in how they’re prepared and cured. To make bacon, pork belly sides are brined and then smoked. Pancetta, the Italian version of bacon, is made by seasoning a pork belly side with salt and lots of pepper, curling it into a tight roll, and wrapping it in a casing to hold the ...


12

My guess is that your pan was super-hot when you put in the bacon, and the fat didn't have time to render out fast enough to work as lube in the pan to keep things from getting sticky and then burnt. I've never been able to cook bacon in three minutes, it usually takes closer to 15. Next time, try using the oven and baking it. Still tastes like bacon, ...


12

I agree with both rumtscho and James Barrie on some points. First off, modern bacon that is "smoked" just might ONLY have smoke ADDED as a flavoring and not "be" smoked, OR not smoked for as long a period of time. While adding salt and chemical preservatives will enhance the shelf life it will not inherently kill ALL bacteria (see below for more ...


11

The meat for turkey bacon comes from the thigh of the turkey and can be cured or uncured, smoked, chopped, and reformed into strips that resemble traditional pork bacon. Source: Wikipedia article


11

This may not be a perfect answer, since I'm Canadian - but our breakfast is pretty close to what you refer to as the English breakfast, minus the tomato. I think an "authentic" English breakfast is rather different, but that's another question entirely! If I understand correctly, you're hung up on two things, the first being timing and the second being ...


11

I'm english. I mitigate timing issues by warming a pyrex dish or just a plate by keeping it under the pan I am grilling the stuff in (or in the oven on very low usually with the door open), then putting the bits that are cooked in the pan to keep warm. Generally this is because I'm doing it for more than I can do on the grill in a single sitting though, ...


10

To answer what I think is the question (you put all of the grease into a container and there's a residue at the top), bacon drippings are not 100% fat. There are also solid pieces of bacon in there and other "impurities" from the curing process. When rendering bacon fat, you should line the container with a paper towel first. Pour the bacon drippings onto ...


10

One way to do it is to render the fat from the bacon first. Once the bacon is crispy you can remove it and add the greens. Cook them down until finished and right before serving you can add the bacon crumbled. If it's served right away the bacon will be crispy. If you leave it out too long or go to re-heat the next day then they will be softened. There is no ...


10

Cutting bacon into cubes was a regular prep task for me when I was cooking professionally, so I got very fast at it. Here are the tricks I found: Fully cooked (baked) bacon cuts MUCH faster and cleaner, and you can make perfect cubes Don't use a serrated knife. It'll be easier to cut with, but it will shred and fray the bacon as you slice, eventually ...


9

I set the oven to 400F, line a half sheet pan with aluminum foil, place a cooling rack inside the pan, and then put the bacon on top of the cooling rack. It takes between 20 and 30 minutes to reach the point that I like it, but you may want to stop it earlier. Also good, blend some brown sugar and pecans until the pecans are well mixed with the sugar and ...


9

Put on a cookie sheet. Use a high temp (375F+) for 10-20 minutes depending on desired crispness. For easier cleaning of the cookie sheet, line it with aluminum foil. To let the grease drain, corrugate the foil. (This is by far what I prefer.) If you do this, remember before you tear off your sheet from the roll, you'll need ~2x as much foil for the same ...


9

Depends on how many solids and how much water you have in it. If you've rendered, filtered, and refined it, it should last a few weeks easy. Note: my mother maintained it never EVER went bad, refrigerated or not. Lot of old time southern cooks will say the same, but they all go through it fast.


8

I did my internship for culinary school in London, and if I recall correctly from what I saw in the markets there, what you call Gammon would be equivalent to our Ham - both coming from the pig's rear leg. What we call bacon is what you'd call "streaky" or "streaky bacon" which is made from the pork belly. Streaky would be the best substitute in recipes ...


8

Yes you can. The term is called par-cooking. Just fry it briefly in a skillet, drain, and wrap your item.


8

If you're buying bacon at the store, and trying to reduce the actual sodium in the product you've just purchased - you're out of luck. Like most things, you can't un-salt it. You can reduce the flavor, but in your case, the sodium is still there. Alternative options include: Buy reduced sodium bacon Make reduced sodium bacon Use less bacon, in order to ...


8

Does the package say it needs to be kept refrigerated? Did it come from refrigerated storage at the store? If either of these is true, then you should toss it. Bacon CAN be heavily smoked and cured for room-temperature storage, but most grocery-store bacon is not this kind. Due to the nitrates/nitrates and smoking process, normal bacon should be safe at ...


8

This is specifically the reason for the invention of Bacon Presses


8

This is how I cook bacon, and also produce almost perfectly flat bacon. No special tools required (Well, I'm assuming most people have the following in their kitchen). Tools Sheet Tray Cooling Rack (slightly smaller than the sheet tray) parchment paper (Optional, but makes for easier cleanup). BACON (I like the extra-thick cut). Steps Take the sheet ...


8

As the bacon cooks the meat reduces in size faster than the fat does. Since they are cut into strips this causes the fat to bunch up or even coil if the bacon isn't flipped enough. The fat will eventually reduce as well when it renders but not enough to straighten out the poor bacon.


7

I think the problem is actually not the heating, but the refrigeration! Consider: bacon fat solidifies easily and thickly, and does so even at room temperature. When you throw it in the fridge, the micro-droplets of bacon fat will turn to solids and clump together. These solid droplets are frozen in place when solid, but when you thaw it, they melt and ...


7

The existence of gas in a vacuum-sealed environment could be a sign of microbial activity. I would assume that, since the package appears to be sealed, that the gases in it were introduced from within. I would toss that one and feel OK using the other two.


7

I'm pretty sure that's just steam and hot air bubbling in the layer of fat/grease that's all over the bacon.



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