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28

Water is a great solvent for polar molecules. Sugar, table salt, and other small polar molecules are water soluble. When you put them into water, you get a sugar resp. salt solution. Other molecules are not soluble in water. Most organic molecules with a carbohydrate tail are insoluble (unless they have a strongly polar active group, like the shorter ...


28

Baking powder, especially if too great a quantity is used, adds an unpleasant flavor to a baked good. Even in an appropriate quantity it can be noticeable and it certainly doesn't do anything to enhance the flavor. Many baked goods traditionally don't use a chemical leavener at all, but instead rely on technique. Creaming butter and sugar together or ...


25

First of all- yeast is not nearly as complicated to use as your question would seem to imply. Yes it is a living organism but it is a very simple one. Active dry yeast will stay viable for years in the freezer and it is easy enough to avoid adding it to water that is too hot for it. It can be inconvenient to wait for yeast products to rise but there are two ...


21

Normal double-acting baking powder makes CO2 (thus giving a rising effect) in two ways: when it gets wet, and when it is heated. Baking soda only makes CO2 when it gets wet. From Wikipedia: The acid in a baking powder can be either fast-acting or slow-acting.[6] A fast-acting acid reacts in a wet mixture with baking soda at room temperature, ...


20

Baking soda is pure sodium bicarbonate, while baking powder includes an acidifying agent (cream of tartar) and a drying agent (starch). You can substitute baking soda for baking powder if you already have an acidifying agent in a recipe (like buttermilk). http://chemistry.about.com/cs/foodchemistry/f/blbaking.htm


16

The existing answers already explain why yeast and baking powder won't work together. But even if they did, you wouldn't have a reason to use them. You seem to think that fluffiness depends on the amount of gas produced by the leaveners. In fact, it depends on both the gas and the ability of the dough to trap that gas. If you produce too much gas (no ...


15

Everything @Jefromi says in his answer is correct--I wanted to elaborate on why it is true. In order for a yeast raised bread to work, since the yeast generates the raising gas (carbon dioxide) slowly over time, it has to stay trapped for a long time. This requires a good gluten network. The gluten network is like little rubber balloons throughout the ...


13

For 1 cup self-raising flour, add 1½ tsp baking powder+ ¼ tsp salt to 1 cup all purpose flour. (http://www.joyofbaking.com/IngredientSubstitution.html) Edit: Calculation added by Sebbidychef: According to http://www.jsward.com/cooking/conversion.shtml 1 cup of un-sifted all-purpose flour is equal to 120g. Therefore 1000 divided by 120 is 8.3 recurring ...


12

You might want to have a read through Why use yeast instead of baking powder? to fully understand the differences between yeast and baking powder. The short summary is that baking powder tastes bad if there's enough to taste, but it's a lot easier and faster to use. But either one provides enough leavening to do pretty much whatever you want. Given that, the ...


10

On the off-chance that you have no baking powder, but you do have baking soda and cream of tartar, you can make your own baking powder: 1 teaspoon baking soda 2 teaspoons cream of tartar 1 teaspoon corn starch (optional) Mix it all together and use it immediately. Reference: http://frugalliving.about.com/od/condimentsandspices/r/Baking_Powder.htm


10

1. Chemical leaveners There are two "oldfashioned" chemical leaveners, both still used today in traditional German and Scandinavian gingerbread recipes: Potassium carbonate (potash or pearl ash) and Ammonium bicarbonate (salt of heartshorn) They do have their own quirks and pitfalls, but if nothing else is available... If you can get baking soda, mix ...


8

There are two reasons (that have also been discussed in many other questions) Baking powder isn't just sodium bicarbonate + acid. It often also contains aluminum compounds that release gas when they are heated. That means they will make bubbles not just when the batter is mixed but also when it is baking. Baking powder is ph neutral while baking soda is ...


8

Yorkshire puddings rise because of the eggs in them. This means that the mixture for you Yorkshire puddings needs heat to rise So if your oven is not hot enough, they won't rise as much as you want. So here are some tips: -make sure your oven is hot before putting your puddings in -Don't open the oven while cooking your puddings -I always pre heat the ...


8

Yes, I have found several sources that say that citric acid is about 4 times the strength of cream of tartar. So, mix 1 teaspoon of baking soda and 1/2 teaspoon of citric acid and use a 1/2 teaspoon of the mixture. That should work. Let us know! EDIT: Oops, I should have mentioned this before the OP accepted. Hopefully, he'll realize, or see this. That ...


8

I completely agree with Jefromi's answer. I do want to add a bit. Salt is an amazing flavor enhancer and most (sweet) baked goods use very little (1/4 to 1 tsp) considering that most of the recipes make 12-24 servings (more for cupcakes/cookies etc) but it does make a difference. Most baked desserts gain quite a bit from having the added salt... and they ...


7

It's important to note that homemade forms of baking powder need to be treated like recipes using only baking soda....they MUST go into the oven immediately otherwise the carbon dioxide bubbles will rise to the surface and pop, releasing the gas to the atmosphere instead of trapping it inside the baked goods. The result will be a dense heavy texture. ...


7

According to David Lebovitz: Because natural cocoa powder hasn’t had its acidity tempered, it’s generally paired with baking soda (which is alkali) in recipes. Dutch-process cocoa is frequently used in recipes with baking powder, as it doesn’t react to baking soda like natural cocoa does. So, if you're using non-Dutched (natural) cocoa, you can use ...


7

In baking, salt is generally only for flavor: things won't taste as good without it. So you can reduce it or leave it out if you want, just be aware that you may sacrifice some flavor. This shouldn't have anything to do with the baking powder. Baked goods that don't use baking powder usually contain salt as well.


6

I must confess, I can't give you straight substitution amounts -- all of these leavening agents behave somewhat differently, so in most cases a straight substitution for baking soda isn't appropriate. Ye Olde List of Leavening Agents: Biological Cultures (Wikipedia, plus kefir whey I've seen recipes for) Yeast - norm is 1 tsp/pound flour for 1-2 hour ...


5

The main problem with adding the baking powder last would be getting it evenly incorporated throughout the dough or batter. In the traditional methods where it is in the dry ingredients, it can be sifted or whisked evenly throughout the dry mixture which facilitates having it evenly distributed in the final batter. If you tried adding the powder to a ...


5

For all practical purposes, yes. Just don't let moisture get near them. Both are a single chemical compound which does not react with air. The only thing you have to worry about is entropy, and it will not do anything bad for the next few decades. It doesn't matter if you mix and use the day after buying or years later, unlike the mix, which ages because ...


4

My Tibetan friends make a yeast dough, then adds a little baking powder while rolling it out.This gives the steamed dumpling dough more resiliency.


4

The baking powder does very little to the roti. If you are making them to eat as soon as they are done, there is no need for baking powder. I assume you are asking about Indian-style chapatis, which are flat breads with no yeast leavening, very similar to flour tortillas. There are many publications that have studied the effects of chemical leavening ...


4

Chemical leaveners all work the same way. You have a basic salt (like sodium bicarbonate) and an acid (incorporated in baking powder, like cream of tartar, or coming from the dough itself, like a baking soda leavened cake with yoghurt in the batter). You have probably seen the reaction at some point in science class, but if not, go mix a teaspoonfull of ...


4

You can certainly make your own from the recipe given and it will not begin to react until both ingredients are present along with water, but the issue is that the smaller the quantities, the greater percentage wise the error you get for small measurement errors. Also, the recipe you have given is for a "single acting" baking powder which begins to ...


4

For baking, you may be able to find flour with leaveners already mixed in. Look for self-rising or self-raising flour. Note that in the US at least, self-rising flour also has salt added.


3

You might look at what the specific chemical agents are in your baking powder; it's possible that you have one that uses sodium acid pyrophosphate, which can leave a bitter taste. Some people avoid the various aluminum based ones, as they can give a metallic taste, but it's likely preferable to bitter. You can use baking soda and an acid, but it'll then be ...


3

Baking powder is like a fast-acting yeast; it is used to infuse air into baking mixtures by way of carbon dioxide bubbles, created by a base reacting to an acid. Baking power is made of three different parts: An acid A base A filler All three need to be dry powders that can be mixed together, common ingredients are cream of tartar (acid), baking soda ...


3

Rotis made at home don't have baking powder. I am sure the store bought ones use it to make the rotis extra soft and fluffy it is heats up.


3

You can make your own baking powder using baking soda, cornstarch, and cream of tartar. 1/4 tsp baking soda 1/2 tsp cream of tartar 1/4 tsp cornstarch That will give you one tsp baking powder. Increase as necessary. Also, if you don't have all those ingredients, you can use 3 measures of baking powder for every measure of baking soda, although you won't ...



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