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33

No peeling is needed. A good wash and proper cooking will handle all of your food safety needs.


28

Okay, I did some more thorough searching and found Beki Cook's donut frosting recipe. Apparently my mistake was that I was letting them (the doughnuts) cool off, and according to the article: Glaze is the easiest way to sugar-up a donut. But there are a few things you need to remember. First and foremost... only glaze donuts when they're warm. If you do ...


15

First off, do not use sand paper. The sandpaper grit will wear off over use (which is it's function) and possibly remain in the dough. You don't want anyone eating sand paper grit, and I'm not even sure what it would do. It might even be a hospital-level problem if the grit gets embedded in any digestive tract tissues and causes inflammation. Ugg. Please ...


11

Absolutely no peeling necessary. In addition to the above advice, if you (or anyone else) is overly concerned about 'germs' and the like on the skin, use a small plastic-bristled scrub brush to clean the potatoes properly under running water. I usually don't, unless they are really gritty from the field or have huge divots on the surface where water may not ...


10

I'd take a different approach entirely. Throw out the cookies, or at least don't eat them. Compost them, or build a cookie fort for small mammals, or make something decorative, or play cookie frisbee (probably outdoors). Use your imagination. Consider this failure a learning experience – remember to actually learn from it – and try again.


7

I rarely peel my potatoes, I love the flavor and nutritional benefits (and ease) of retaining the peelings. If skin is too old or green, then I'll peel. This discusses the concern of green potatoes: Are Green Potatoes OK? PS: I always wash my potatoes with a vegetable brush under water; I always wash all produce.


6

Not only is peeling not needed for potatoes, but in my educated opinion peeling potatoes is not recommended. As long as you follow proper food etiquette like washing your hands and properly washing the foods before you cook them, as well as cooking at the proper temperature, then you do not need to worry about bacteria. Make sure to wash the potato well, ...


4

Your question has two main parts, what's elastic about gluten, and why don't other plants have this unicorn we call a gluten protein. I'll provide some background info first, but feel free to skip ahead to the spoilers if you like. Quick and dirty background on proteins... All proteins (like gluten) are made of differing sequences, and number of about 20 ...


4

Take a sharp knife and scrape it off.


3

How it's supposed to be done The lump problem is straightforward: your mixing technique is failing. When you are using a well, you have to sift the flour first. Then you add a little bit of the homogenous liquid. So, you don't pour oil, eggs, etc. into the well, but first get them all into another bowl (including the water), and mix them well, preferably ...


3

Any time you have a recipe that calls for dissolving baking soda in hot water before mixing with other ingredients, it is done to enhance the color of the final product. Baking soda is a leavener and also contributes to browning in baked goods. Many, but not all, recipes that call for this added step also include some baking powder in the recipe (I repeat ...


3

The leavening action of baking soda begins as soon as it is moistened - that is as soon as you mix your wet and dry ingredients your baking soda begins the chemical reaction that creates the carbon dioxide which causes the rise in your quick bread. Because of this I would say that there is no advantage, but in fact a disadvantage to resting a quick bread. ...


2

Instead of using the manufacturer's recipe, try this one. It has perfect consistence for decorating. You can use milk or water. Water works great and tastes fine. It won't spoil. 2 LB bag Dominos conf sugar, 1 cup regular Crisco, 2 teaspoons good clear vanilla, 2 teasp good butter flavoring, 1/2 teaspoon almond flavoring (opt), 1 Tablespoon Meringue ...


2

One of the best toppings for a pizza is egg, just don't put it on at the start. Let the pizza cook for about 12 minutes then crack the egg on top and place back in for another 6-8 minutes. This should leave the egg runny, but if you don't want it like this then just leave for a little longer. Onions and peppers are good toppings as well and they can go on ...


2

No, I don't think you need to peel them. That said, in some parts of the former ussr, peeling potatoes is (claimed to be) a must. So your relative's sentiment isn't without some precedent, at least.


2

I would like to clarify a couple points from the question and the comments here. First of all, remember that flour (wheat or spelt) does not contain gluten. Gluten only forms as a complex protein once two simpler proteins in flour, gliadin and glutenin, are hydrated. And while not all of the protein in flour will form gluten in the presence of water, the ...


2

(1) Are you baking them upper/lower or side-by-side?, (2) Is your oven's outside width 24" or 30"?, & (3) Gas or electric? My guess would be that either you have a 24" oven and you're baking upper/lower or you have a 30" oven and you're baking side-by-side. Either way, I think the ultimate culprit is heat circulation - certainly you wouldn't be ...


1

I'm not sure but I think brown suger can also be used to make a Herman. The Herman dough consists of Lactobacillales and yeast. Both need sugar to live. White refined sugar mostly consists of saccharose (99,96 % saccharose, 0,04 % inverted sugar syrup).1 Brown sugar is nothing else than white sugar mixed with molasses. 2 Therefore I assume that you can use ...


1

Is it related to no gluten and the fact it's obviously not as elastic as your normal wheat bread? No, it isn't. First of all: spelt is not gluten-free. It is very closely related to wheat, and has lots of gluten in it. Second, you make it sound as if you suspect that spelt bread will always have a split crust. But this is not the case, spelt breads ...


1

Place the cookies in an airtight tupperware container with several slices of bread spread over them. The cookies will suck the moisture from the bread and soften up. The time it will take to work can be anywhere from an afternoon, or overnight. It just depends on how hard the cookies are. I usually do this with just one or two slices of bread to keep ...


1

What about seitan (wheat gluten) (also available in dried form as e.g. chips) or fried (and dried, not shown in the picture) tofu bits or tofu skin? Pro: All these kinds of food are dryable and rubbery. Con: I suspect that you can't make this at home - it would be very time-consuming. (Hm, except the tofu. Buy fresh tofu, slice them into little ...


1

The method I've used to add toppings to frozen pizza is- use frozen toppings. For example, green peppers are in my opinion a great addition to pizza. I usually keep frozen green peppers and other pizza-worthy vegetables for use with many things, and frozen pizza is one of them. This way, I simply add the toppings to the pizza before baking and viola! Easy, ...


1

do what you would do with sand paper but with the edge of a blade at 90°. i sometimes do that in toasts. EDIT: agree with both comments below :)


1

The boiling water is actually an integral part of the recipe - the heat insures that the cocoa powder fully dissolves and contributes to a richer, more chocolate-y cake - and adding the baking soda to the water first will probably have more to do with enriching the color of the final baked cake than it has to do with leavening. It is NOT tied to sanitation ...


1

Typically, if adding flour doesn't help immediately, you can let the dough (batter?) sit covered, in the fridge for a while. The chill will help to firm the dough up, and the extra time will allow the flour to fully hydrate. If it's still not workable after that point, put it onto either plastic wrap or waxed paper, and roll it into a log, twisting the ...


1

I do this quite frequently, as well as making my own pizzas. Most pizzas will cook in approximately 20 minutes, so it is absolutely fine to put any of your favourite toppings on right from the start of cooking. It may be beneficial for some foods which are more likely to char (such as broccoli or thinly sliced ham) to be either dipped in water first or ...


1

Effectively what's happening is that the outer crust is forming before the inside has finished rising. This is the exact reason with a yeast bread that you would slice the loaf before baking, so that we can control how the crust breaks. (as it wouldn't break on its own, it's too strong). In the case of a cake or quick bread, you don't have gluten, so ...


1

Amazon has some individual brownie pans that are, I believe, what you may be looking for. http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=individual%20brownie%20pan


1

Read the ingredient list for all the flavourings & do a simple water test to be sure. My Irish Cream one has almond oil in it and would not blend with water. My Watkins Butter flavour has no oil listed in it but behaved like oil when added to water. It's a complicated & tricky business to get Royal Icing to actually taste good (my fave flavour for ...


1

In Cook's Illustrated Chewy Chocolate Cookies (different recipe than the one above), the tricks include only using an egg white, and replacing some of the sugar with dark brown corn syrup because the yolk surprisingly dries it out. They also suggest using softened butter that's around 70 degrees, and chilling for thirty minutes before doling out. There's ...



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