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16

These days, wedding cakes can be pretty much any kind of cake. A traditional wedding cake is certainly more or less a Christmas cake - a dense, dark, 'matured' fruit cake with marzipan and royal icing. However, nowadays you will find that anything goes - flavoured sponges are extremely popular. The main criteria is that the cake should be sufficiently dense ...


9

If it is sparking then it is not microwave safe and you should get your money back. No change of mode is going to help, it is the material and construction of the pan which is the problem.


5

Traditions for wedding cakes have varied so much over time and throughout the Pretanic Isles as to make "the tradition" impossible to settle on. Having different cakes for different tiers is both long-standing and popular today, as well as being of practical benefit (having a relatively solid cake like chocolate-biscuit at the bottom for example). Fruit ...


4

I've had two food products made to my specifications via contract manufacturing and evaluated contract manufacturing of several other products. Fundamentally the process requires you to have enough of an understanding of the product you want to be able to work with the contract manufacturer to make it. In one case, I didn't have any meaningful experience ...


3

My Partner used to be a pro wedding cake maker and I've helped her do a few over the years for friends and family. The tiers can be any cake these days, but only a fruit cake is dense enough to support tiers above it without dowels, use of a cake stand neatly gets around this. It used to be a tradition that the top (smallest) tier would be a fruit cake ...


3

Most of the bake times that recipes give you are very general ideas of how long you should bake something. This is why most of them are given in ranges rather than in specific values. (20-25 minutes instead of specifically saying 21 minutes) The reason for this is because there are a lot of variables when it comes to baking including the thickness and ...


3

I agree with Jefromi that the easiest solution is just to get a cheap oven thermometer that you can put into the oven. I'm not sure where you're from or the availability of them, but they are generally quite cheap. Before such things existed, people had methods for testing oven temperatures for baking. The most common one was to put your hand into the ...


2

It will if you add more icing sugar but you may end up with a lot of buttercream depending on how much of the icing you have left. A basic ratio is 4 cups icing sugar to 1 cup of butter and 1/4 cup of liquid which makes 3 cups of icing. You may have to add more icing sugar, then more butter to compensate for the water if there's more than 1/4 cup in your ...


2

I'm afraid you're going to have to use a thermometer if you want to have any reliability. Hopefully your oven holds a reasonably steady temperature so you'll be able to match what recipes call for. Oven thermometers are really cheap; if you tried to do without it you'll probably waste more money on ingredients for failed cakes (not to mention the time) than ...


2

In August you will have not one, but two "enemies" to keep in check: Heat and humidity. Heat gives you trouble with every kind of food that gets runny when not cooled, so for some frostings refrigeration or at least a cool space to store is crucial. But as soon as you take your cool cake out (to be displayed or transported) without cooling... Humidity ...


2

I use a recipe that is similar and have good results. I believe that I use 1 cup of peanut butter, 1 cup of sugar, and 1 egg. These turn out a very nice texture. If I were you I would sub some or all of the syrup for regular sugar to make it a bit dryer and make sure to add an egg.


2

EDIT: Although the question title says "fruit pies," the question specifies a "fruit custard pie." The following answer relates to custard pies and other pies containing fillings with eggs and/or milk. Actual plain "fruit pies" generally contain enough sugar to prevent rapid spoilage and therefore often do not require refrigeration. If you do plan to ...


2

Make sure that there is no metallic loose part in the microwave. It may be of any other origin, not just the pan. And moreover check for the proper neutral in the switch. If every thing is okay then you can claim the warranty I guess.


2

I put my bread in the slow cooker on the 'warm' function. Works a treat!


2

You can try to cook an omelette. It worked perfectly for me, except I have added some extra vegies to it.


2

It should be easily usable in applications where the egg texture is not that important. Find a recipe which needs both eggs (not whipped) and a liquid, and add the liquid to the overwhipped egg until the foam has subsided. Add the yolks back in (such recipes generally call for whole eggs). This should work with different types of griddle cakes: pancakes, ...


1

(Liquid) water cannot exceed 100°C because that it's boiling point, and any additional heat applied goes toward the latent heat of evaporation needed to turn it into a gas (steam, which can then be higher than 100°C). Oils have a boiling point much higher than water, and a point lower than that (but still much higher than water's boiling point) called the ...


1

Yes, it is just fine to bake a cake in a pan like the one we talked about in comments. A pan of that type may stick a bit more than a metal pan, so you might find "cake release" to be of benefit. It's unlikely that you will have any problems at all, but read Aaronut's answer here.


1

Not at all. It is possible to make bread that way, but it's rather rare. If you are using any kind of preferment, even a 10 minute sponge, you are likely to add dry ingredients to it. Then you add this mixture of dry+wet to the rest, and the order for "the rest" can vary. Also, if you have any enrichments, they are usually added after the flour has been ...


1

For cheese cakes water bath makes more sense cause you want to avoid burning of the batter by keeping the heat contact directly from the tray. For brownies the contact of the hot plate is required, and that is how you get a little solid outer part. When you try to water bath brownies, they would have more or less like cheese cake texture, I actually tried ...


1

Yes! You can, in fact, it is used in India to make fresh pasta like Gujarati dal dhokri.


1

The biggest problem I have is the overpowering bean flavor this flour causes. I have had no problem using it in recipes other than the nasty bean flavor.


1

I have tried twice to bake a double-crust Blueberry pie in my convection oven with poor results both times. The crust comes out hard as a rock (homemade crust, not store bought). After the first attempt, I tried again adjusting temperature and time, but the results were still poor. As you know, berry pies require high heat for the berries and sugar to ...



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