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6

There are kits available for making your own custom molds from food-grade silicone. The finished molds can be used for various cooking purposes including candy making and baking. The laboratory I work for has used products made by The Smooth-On Company for many years and they are of high quality: ...


5

My suggestion would be to just go with the sugar increase, it might be sufficient to increase moisture. You can combine it with less baking time, if you want to - try using a thermometer and bake to 94 C, maybe 96 if it gets out underbaked. If it still feels dry, you should add fat, not water. Increase the butter, and maybe add one more yolk. You can ...


4

Many cakes in bakeries are brushed or drizzled with simple syrup once they've cooled. This helps to add moisture to the cake, and the hygroscopic nature of the syrup also helps to prevent staling. It sounds like this would be the perfect solution for you as it would be adding both moisture and a bit more sugar, but without having an effect on the crumb. For ...


4

Bakery glazes are frequently made with pectin, so that is an option. It would still be a noticeable glaze, though it would be clear and could be flavorless. If you just want the flowers to stick to the top of the cheesecake, it's possible that it would be tacky enough without any glaze. They might just stick to the surface. Alternately, you could use one of ...


2

sometimes i'll replace 1/2 the butter in my cookies with peanutbutter and will cut the sugar a little. they still turn out pretty well. replacing all the butter would be bad, but some of it won't make much of a difference.


2

This is borderline unclear what you're asking but I'll take a shot at it. Cinnamon rolls are made using a fortified yeast dough. Fortified means that there is butter/shortening and/or eggs added, which slow down the yeast action. There are a few things that aren't right with what you are doing. you are using self-rising flour in a recipe that is ...


2

when using baking soda for pretzel making it is optional to boil (hot method) the dough shortly in the solution or simply dip the dough in a non-boiling, warm (cold method) solution. hot vs cold depends on the texture you want in the finished bread... -HOT METHOD: when you boil the dough it creates/cooks a deeper outside layer w the solution which leads ...


2

I submitted an edit to fix up your question because it sounded like a product recommendation. Can you also provide more info, like what you would be using them for? Here are a few characteristics I looked for in my recent purchase: Thickness - thinner spatulas would be easier to slide under food Stiffness in the handle - better for stirring soups, stews ...


2

It's very normal for a chiffon cake to contract some after baking, sometimes this leads people to think something is wrong. What's happening is that the trapped air is cooling and takes up less volume. However, if you are ending up with a very dense cake then something is definitely going wrong. You may be underbaking it: if the cake's structure is not ...


2

I use a therometer. King Arthur flour suggests measuring 1 inch away from the edge of the cheesecake and looking for a temperature between 165F and 170F. Americas Test Kitchen/Cooks Illustrated has recommended 165F in the center (checked in 20 minute intervals, provided that you're not close to 165F). However, I remember on the television show that they ...


2

It's not a specific date, as there are just too many variables -- what temperature it's been stored at, and how many days since the seal has been broken are likely more significant. Growing up, my mom would use it for pancakes and baking once it started to smell a little bit off, but would dispose of it when it started to curdle (separate & get chunky). ...


1

Every substitution is probably going to require other alterations. Baking soda's effects extend beyond leavening: it generally reacts with acidic ingredients (making the batter less sour) and also provides sodium ions which can affect flavor. If the substitute doesn't react with acid as strongly, you may need to decrease acid ingredients or substitute ...


1

A mix of clarified and ordinary unsalted butter works well. I used clarified butter that was simmered for a long time to be sure the water was thoroughly removed, just to the point where it stops sputtering, and the solids in the bottom begin to brown. If the unsalted butter has a fat content of 80% and clarified near 100%, then a 20% clarified to 80% ...


1

I haven't tried this, but it could work... Since the difference between European butter and American butter is fat content, maybe you could do a combination of butter and shortening. American butter is normally 80% fat (or more). European butter is normally 85% fat (or more). Shortening is 100% fat (it doesn't contain water). I wouldn't use all shortening ...


1

I was wondering if this should be closed as too broad or unclear, or answered. I'll attempt an answer. The information you are looking for doesn't exist. First, there are no common factors which make all and any food tasty. Second, the factors which make most foods tasty have nothing to do with absorption, and in fact most foods do not absorb anything at ...


1

If you read some of the reviews on the one that says to bake for 45 minutes (Brennan's), many of them say it was done in less time: sunnieday: Really great and simple recipe. Recommended cook time is too long. I cooked mine for about 25 minutes and it was perfect. Will use this again. Nutmeg~n~Pepper After making as written and baking for the ...


1

Baked, covered, at low heat : ovens self-regulate, so you're going to get a more consistent result each time than doing it on the stovetop. covering will minimize evaporation, which will cool the top more. low heat will minimize problems with the edges cooking before the middle ... but eggs also have this strange thing where it's more difficult to over ...


1

Two reasons to final proof in the fridge... Flavour Convenience Time = flavour. Increasing the fermentation time helps bring out more flavour. If you are too busy to follow the recipe through then you can use your fridge for convenience.


1

I think I have similar gas oven as you have.What I do is bake for some time from bottom till I see slight brownish bottom of bread/ bun then I switch to top gas burners( broiler) and bake. This is risky as the bun becomes brown very fast. Problem is the browning is not even and get some dark patches here and there. I will try keeping the bottom tray with ...


1

I have just experimented and made my third pavlova. The first two turned out a golden colourule and a bit soft although they tasted OK. The third one was white and looks perfect. Followed Delia's recipe plus tsp vinegar and tsp rose water. Heat oven to gas mark 1. Place pavlova in the oven and reduce temperature to 's' (slow) for 1 1/2 hours. Turn off oven ...



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