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5

It is no different from other prototyping processes or exploratory research. You are not confirming a scientific hypothesis here, you are actively searching. So the most important thing is: fail fast. So, for the question of mini batches vs. large batches, you certainly need mini batches. And in cooking it is more important than in other fields, as humans ...


3

TL;DR You should be fine. Lemon bread, banana bread, etc are quick breads. They are made using the "muffin method". As you said, fat and sugar are creamed together, emulsified with egg, and then incorporated into the dry ingredients. The fat and sugar are creamed to incorporate air that will help define the final texture. Sometimes the emulsion doesn't ...


3

I have baked many a frozen pizza without a tray and never had a pizza lose structural integrity like that. The oven should be quite hot (usually the box will specify at least 400°F). Usually the difficulty arises when it's time to get the pizza out of the oven. I suggest a baking tray with no sides.


3

Let the cakes cool in the pan for 15 minutes. Carefully run a table knife around the edge of the pan to make sure the edges of the cake are fully released from the edges of the pan. Place a wire rack over the cake pan, then invert the rack and the pan. Pull the pan off of the cake. Let the cake cool to room temperature. Invert the cake again onto some ...


3

Since a starter is actually a symbiotic mixture of microorganisms, factors like hydration level can change the balance of bacteria and yeasts. Depending on which organisms are favored, it can change the flavor, gas production, etc. They're not necessarily "benefits", but different consistencies can definitely produce different starters. The biggest and most ...


3

Stick a knife directly in the center from above and when it comes out clean ( no uncooked egg mixture, very small amount of oil or clear liquid ok) it's done. Also 165-185F internal temp also measured directly in the center.


2

I have tried almost every method but here's one that works best for me using margarine: Use just a little butter to oil the slightly heated pan and make sure to spread it evenly using a spoon. You then pour the desired amount of pancake mix into the pan, wait for bubbles to form and pop before you flip it (use your spatula to make sure its as golden brown ...


2

I just made a batch of cookies (Walnut size) using a melon baller. Recipe called for 48 cookies and that is exactly what I got. The baller was not heaping, pretty much just filled to the top. Makes nice round cookies.


2

There are two techniques I can think of, that might help. You can try one or the other, or both, as it suits your fancy. First, you mention that a thinner roll of pastry will affect the ratio of filling? Make the whole log thinner. Take that same square of dough, make it into a longer rectangle. take the same cylinder of turkish delight, make it into a ...


2

An alternative to a wire rack is to simply turn them upside down. The bottoms need exposure to the air to cool and dry - against a plate (or the pan) they sweat leftover moisture from the baking, which a cooling rack is supposed to prevent. However, the important bit seems to be cooling the undersides - so if you don't have a rack, even just flipping them ...


2

I'm in the process of making brownie bites. Using the King Arthur Flour Ultimate Chewy Brownie recipe. (Not a sales pitch; I have several to choose from but like this best.) Using a 2 doz tin and a #40 baking scoop, spritz with a touch of oil then bake for 16 mins in a 350°F oven. They come out just right for me. Not fudgey, mind you, but soft and moist.


2

With any experimental design, controlling the variables is a key problem, and this cuts two ways for your question. Mini-Batches increase the relative effect of measurement errors and/or how critical the measuring is in general; but they reduce the impact of weather conditions such as humidity and temperature that will vary from day to day. A full-scale ...


1

Maybe a long shot, but did you by any chance just make this recipe up yourself? Or modify a good recipe? This happens to my baking experiments a lot; I think when my batter starts out too liquid & doesn't cook all the way in the middle of the pan, or it has too much leavening (baking soda/powder) which causes over fluffing, then sink-age when the baked ...


1

I've cooked bread on the stove many times. My setup was a cast iron pan with a metal trivet inside and a small pot inside that, which is what the bread dough was placed in. I then had an old rice cooker pot inverted over the pan. That essentially created a small stovetop oven. The small pot was on the trivet so the pot didn't get direct heat from the cast ...


1

The question is tough to answer in general for all possible bread types. For most of the answer, I'm going to assume we're talking at least about a yeasted wheat-based bread, formed into something resembling some standard European-style loaf type. What would be the difference between a bread dough that had a sufficient water component, vs a bread ...


1

Can anyone say what the chemical difference between the two is? I can't say definitively. Here are the ingredients of Clabber Girl: Here are the ingredients of Rumford: The ingredients are similar, but different ordering. That is significant. Also note that Clabber Girl brand has aluminum as an ingredient, Rumsford does not. (I learned from these ...


1

In the UK the instructions generally tell you to put the pizza directly on the shelf. This is what I always do and have never had problems. I can only see the above happening where someone has gotten used to doing this and then tried it with fresh dough.


1

When you did different filings before, I suspect they took less heating up, and that your cheesy filling is stopping the internal temperature getting as high as it should. This could be because the cheese goes on fridge cold and has a higher heat capacity than whatever you used before. The water content of the pimentos and cheese may also not help. In ...


1

You need to start (and maybe stay) from low temperature. This way the moisture will leave the cookie. If you start with high temperature you making a firm skin that won't let the moisture leave.


1

You need to skip the milk in the cookie recipe. If you want to add dairy, you can put dry milk or cream cheese. Milk isn't for cookies.


1

Never use mugs on the stove, FYI. Due to heat expansion and propagation, the part touching the burner will expand first, causing the material to undergo extreme stresses and the ceramic will shatter.



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