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18

The reasons people still roast whole birds are: Roasting a whole chicken is easier than butterflying it. While it's not tough to butterfly a chicken many people don't know how, or don't want the cleanup It's less prep time to roast a whole chicken. If you are busy you can have it from the fridge to the oven in less than a minute, while butterflying or ...


10

Rounding to the nearest 10C is more accurate than your thermostat probably is anyway (don't round up, round to the nearest). Conversion isn't your issue, your thermostat is much more likely your culprit. Use an oven thermometer, not your dial. And keep in mind that ovens hover above and below their set temperature by switching on and off. Use Google or ...


8

All other factors - ambient temperature, humidity, oven temp, etc - accounted for, the specific time of the day doesn't make any difference, whatsoever. But alas, this is the real world, we don't hold other factors constant. Most likely your room is slightly warmer and potentially your room could be a bit more humid in the afternoon. These could lead to a ...


8

There's nothing wrong with your conversions, they were fine. What you may not have considered is: Convection versus non-convection ovens. When you see a recipe in F it's most likely from the US, and in the US convection ovens are rare. Convection ovens cook with more intensity than non-convection ovens as the fan blows hot air, so when using a recipe for a ...


8

If your goal is to cook your chicken relatively quickly, the only reason to keep it whole is for presentation/appearance and to avoid cutting it up. (For example, I know some people who simply hate handling raw meat, and I imagine for them that the task of butterflying is not only laborious but distressing.) From my perspective, you can save so much ...


5

This is an issue I've had to come to terms with myself. I spent most of my catering life spoilt by having massive fan assisted electric ovens with space for 24 trays at once. Then one day I left it all behind to work in a tiny 2 chef kitchen where all we had was a bottom heated gas oven. The first 6 months was a nightmare. It's still not easy even to this ...


5

You would never want to bake anything past the boiling point of water. Bread gets close. It depends on the recipe just how close, but I've never seen any recipe that looks for an internal temperature of over 200F (93C). Bread is generally "done" at 190F (88C). At temperatures at or above the boiling point of water, you're getting into candy making territory, ...


5

Jolenealaska's answer provides the basics -- internal temperatures over boiling inside baked goods just don't tend to happen under normal conditions. The reason is because most doughs and batters contain a lot of water. The final baked goods generally still retain a lot of that water, too. When the dough is hot and in the oven, however, that water will be ...


4

Additionally to the other answers, you cannot rotisserie a flat bird, which to me, is a great way to cook chicken.


3

One word. Stuffing. You can make stuffing balls, or cook it in a ramekin - but it picks up the meat juice from the bird, and can also flavor the meat from the inside.


3

No, that is just normal dried yeast. Allinson do an instant yeast (they call it Easy Bake yeast) that comes in a green container. You can still use your dried yeast though. Use double the amount, and instead of adding it to the flour, add it to the milk (which should be warmed very gently first - not hot, just 'finger warm'). Let it sit for 5 minutes and ...


3

Absolutely no difference. The small volume that the nuts take up is not enough to change the consistency of the product. Around here they sell extra-crunchy.


3

Nope. For peanut butter cookies it's just a matter of taste, and it's 1:1.


2

Just to clarify (and build on a previous comment): "sourdough bread" generally has anything from a subtle hint of sourness to a strong sour tang. However, the word "sourdough" is also used in bread-making to refer to natural yeast cultures in general, which can be used to produce many types of bread, including those which are not sour at all. As ...


2

An alternative that wasn't presented in the link above would be to mix the white and yolk together and measure the appropriate amount of egg by volume. A large egg consists of about 2 - 2 1/4 Tbsp. white and about 1 Tbsp. yolk. The whole egg, mixed, would total about 3 1/4 Tbsp. (which would be 3 Tbsp. + a little less than 1 tsp. - or just about 10 tsp.). ...


2

As another option, you can keep the sweetness down by using something that will give a very thin glaze, such as a thin royal icing. You can make it with just confectioner's sugar and water, but if you have meringue powder, it'll set up a bit firmer. Pour it into a cup, dip the cake pops, then shake or twirl to remove most of it, then let dry. (a block of ...


2

Coating your cake balls is a good idea, it will help them retain their moisture and shape. There are plenty of not especially sweet options, I would try a cream cheese based frosting with less sugar or a medium-sweet chocolate ganache.


2

Stack them, like this: Rotate them 1/3 and 2/3 the way through cooking, figuring perhaps 25% longer cooking time than each would call for separately. Use an instant read thermometer, look for about 165F (74C). Also look for a bit of browning and bubbliness. It may be that they won't be done at exactly the same time, but they'll be close enough that they ...


2

It sounds like your oven may be miss-calibrated. I would get an oven thermometer and check to be sure it's heating properly. A couple of things to check; 1.Make sure you're using the middle rack in your oven so that the heat can circulate. 2.Make sure you're using a pan that doesn't take up the ENTIRE rack. Space around the sides will allow for better ...


2

To be honest you are going to seriously struggle, it's possible but hard. I've had similar issue's trying to make sweet potato mash. To begin with you are going to need to run the sliced turnips under cold running for a little while (20mins) not sure why but it does help. (also helps with potato and beetroot crisps. Instead of going in the oven full wack ...


1

Perhaps it's because I grew up in a house with a gas oven and have had gas ovens in most of the apartments I lived in for years, but I've never had problems baking with them. But I've also never had the kinds of experiences discussed in this question, even in multiple apartments with cheap old stoves. (The only place I ever had problems cooking things was ...


1

Cooking meats whole and on the bone gives a deeper flavour and thus I would rather cook poultry whole, including chicken. Obviously it depends on the exact recipe you are using the meat in, but if you plan to serve the meat as-is, accompanied by side dishes and a sauce, you will definitely get a better flavour by roasting the bird whole and then carving ...


1

You are asking a surprisingly lot of questions. First, to deal with this question, you need to understand "creaming". So look here and here. Nothing "creams" as dramatically as granulated sugar with room temperature butter. Those particular ingredients are special for that. Brown sugar doesn't accomplish nearly the creaming effect of granulated sugar, but ...


1

Not really, unless you go for a different carbohydrate with physical properties similar to refined sucrose. And if you are removing the sugar for dietary reasons, you're probably not winning anything by doing the substitution. Artificial sweeteners and stevia are just that - a sweetener, not a sugar. They can only be successfully used as a substitute where ...


1

Strong flour has extra gluten added to it, you can find it many varieties (strong white, strong brown, strong wholemeal). I haven't found much difference between brands but I'd avoid store "value" packs. Sometimes if you want a coarser grain you will need something specialist, but I rarely buy flour anywhere but the supermarket. You will probably want to ...


1

Depends on your budget, personally I find bog standard value Tesco strong flour tastes the same as top of the range organic premium stuff. Yeast I think it probably depends on your recipe, some will use fresh some will use dried instant action. The different brands don't really have any influence. I'm convinced it's all made in the same factory but stuck in ...


1

I'm not much of a pastry guy, and I haven't worked with pure glucose before, but it looks like this probably isn't an ideal substitution. Regular table sugar (sucrose) is composed of glucose and fructose, and of the two, fructose is more than twice as sweet. So a simple substitution will leave your end product much less sweet than it should be, and ...


1

They should be perfectly fine if cooked for that long. If you are still uncertain then you can try adding some liquid to the pan to help boil the potatoes.


1

It seems that the best answer to your needs will be making a treacle. It may be challenging to do it with yams, it's typically done with less starchy plants. But I don't think it's impossible, it should be worth a try. Making a treacle basically involves taking a fruit juice, and slowly evaporating and caramelizing it. So, your first step will be to ...


1

It might be possible to roast yams, whip them up and the spin them in a centrifuge. I imagine the yield would be incredibly low because the liquid content of a yam is fairly low. What if, instead, you attempted a yam flavored syrup? You could roast cut up yams in a simple syrup, mash/whip, then clarify. Again, a centrifuge would be ideal, but there are ...



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