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According to David Lebovitz: Because natural cocoa powder hasn’t had its acidity tempered, it’s generally paired with baking soda (which is alkali) in recipes. Dutch-process cocoa is frequently used in recipes with baking powder, as it doesn’t react to baking soda like natural cocoa does. So, if you're using non-Dutched (natural) cocoa, you can use ...


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Why did this happen? One possibility is that the outside of the custard became overcooked while you were waiting for the middle to set. As eggs cook longer they tighten up more and more, squeezing out liquids that were previously captured by the protein matrix. The cooking process continues for a while even after you remove the custard from the oven, so ...


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As DrRandy said in the comments, cookies are really far from banana bread. It's going to be pretty difficult. I would suggest instead looking for a banana cookie recipe. Even if you don't like the first one you find, you can use it as a starting point or find another, and you'll go through a lot fewer failed batches than you will if you try to start from ...


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You don't stir with the knives; the process is called 'cutting in'. You can find videos showing how to do it, but the basic technique is: cut the butter into smaller bits toss the butter bits into the flour mixture. hold a knife in either hand pull the knives across each other, while keeping them touching the bottom of the bowl. You can also hold your ...


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You need to incorporate the butter into the flour such that the butter is in hazelnut sized lumps, without melting the butter. If you chop it that small on a board it will soften as you handle it. So you have to do it in the bowl. You could buy a pastry cutter/dough blender but to be honest they are a pain in the wrist. If you have a food processor, you ...


2

This is the same user who asked if vegetable juices could stop bread from rising. Dude...yes. I'll try to break this down again...There's probably a combination of things happening: your veggie slurry pH is not condusive for yeast function, the enzymes in the vegetable matrix are being unleashed and working(because you juiced them, and exposed them to ...


2

I would suggest that you use corn meal, for the constituency and texture. Here is a recipe link that I think will answer all of your questions including how to cook. http://www.alwaysorderdessert.com/2014/03/homemade-corn-flakes-cereal.html Back in 2009 the bbc in the uk aired a tv programme called jimmys food factory, which explored ways of making ...


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Reference 1 in your Wikipedia link, the patent, describes the process as it was in 1895. Flakes of "corn, and other grains" appear to have been a bit of an afterthought. The basic process is: hot soak, cook, roll, steam cook, roast dry. Looks pretty tedious to do in a home kitchen, but possible with some effort.


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The very nature of cannolis is that they are deep fried, but you don't need a fryer for that, a large pot, a half liter or so of neutral oil and a thermometer are all that you need. Like doughnuts, fried is the way to go, but they can be baked (if you must). Here's a sample recipe: Baked Cannolis.


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The short answer to dense bread is always rise. There are many solutions to rise problems. There are also many other bread problems that are not just about rise (colour, flavour, wetness, shape). However, denseness is always about the rise. Rise happens when microbes (yeast) make air pockets in a network of gluten (or starch, in the case of rye and ...


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I think you can find your answer here. Basically, when the ambient temperature of the surroundings is on the higher side, the icing melts since the butter cannot remain in a solid state. However, what can be done according to the link that I posted, you can add 2 tablespoons of cornstarch per 3 cups of icing to make the icing sturdier. Or you can use other ...


2

In my mind, bread baking containers are divided into two categories: 1- Pans for shape Many bread pans are used only to give bread shape. These can very from "normal" loaf pans for sandwich bread to baguette pans. These pans need to just stay out of the way of the heat as much as possible. Baguette pans are even perforated for this reason. They are ...


1

David Lebovitz tells us that chilling the tins prior to filling helps the cakes to develop a "humpy" appearance, particularly if baking powder is used (which some chefs say to NEVER use in Madeleines). Also, since the tins are usually prepared by brushing with melted butter mixed with flour, chilling would keep that where it belongs instead of it pooling in ...


1

Depends a lot on how thick they are. Thinner chops would work well with just a high-temp sear under the broiler. Whereas a thicker (for example, a double-cut chop) would be better with a two-temperature process. I.e. Bake them until they reach the right temperature at 350 or 400, then finish under the broiler for color and flavor. Same thing applies if ...


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I wish that I knew whether you are trying to make a hokkaido milk bread, or an Ayurvedic-bread-bomb with a basic white bread recipe...like this :http://www.vegrecipesofindia.com/white-bread-easy-white-bread/ I am going to answer this like you're making a more nutrient-dense plain white bread. There are probably a combination of things going on in your ...


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I don't claim that this is a canonical answer, but it seems to be a bit like the situation with apples. You have cooking apples and eating apples, which have been bred for different traits. Similarly you have juicing oranges, eating oranges, and bitter oranges (used for marmalade). The other citrus fruits which taste most like oranges (mandarins, ...


1

Bread dough can be baked with or without a baking pan, tin, or pot. Pans and tins (and rarely pots) are used to give bread a specific shape, without one the dough will simply spread out. Bread pans are usually pretty thin, you don't need a thick material to bake bread in, and thin is cheaper. You don't need to spend a lot on equipment to bake good bread, ...


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Using knives is an old fashioned way to "cut butter." Which really means make the butter into smaller pieces that are then coated with flour. The best way I've found is to skip knives, pastry blenders, or the mess of my food processor, and instead freeze the butter and instead use a box grater, shredding the butter on the largest hole side. Shred the butter ...


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Hi i have the same problem and the only way to cut this smell is by adding lemon and orange zest to the batter. Also you can try a table spoon of whiskey or cognac.



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