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8

Yeast dies at about 130-140F. Bread is done baking at 200F or so. Almost all the yeast is dead when the bread is done.


7

The thermal death point for yeast cells is 130° F–140° F (55° C–60° C). Most bread is cooked when the internal temperature reaches 200 F or 100 C. The yeast is dead.


5

Go the old-fashioned route and simply butter your pan. Worked for our grandmothers, still works today ;-)


3

You'll run into another problem when you take the cake out of the fridge -- condensation. Air will cool when it's near the cake, and the moisture in it will condense on the cake, possibly causing odd dots when you try to blot it dry. (possibly smearing the icing, or the water could cause problems on decorated cakes with any variations in color) You have a ...


3

The most important part of getting a good rise is the way that you pour the batter in the the tray. You must pour a thin stream directly in to the middle of the tray circle. Heat the oil 1) Turn the oven on to 200 degrees centigrade and place a rack in the top half of the oven 2) Put oil in to the Yorkshire pudding trays circles and place in the oven ...


3

The most straightforward approach (especially if you're letting a stand mixer or similar do the work) is to just make three batches, starting the 2nd batch half an hour later than the first, and the third an hour in. Then they should more or less become ready as you're ready to put them in the oven. Upside, it will work exactly as you're used to. Downside, ...


3

If you were going to take the refrigerator approach, it's important to consider when you want to refridgerate it. Immediately after making the dough, stash two of the doughballs in the fridge. Take the first one out after about 25-30 minutes, and the second one out after another 25-30 minutes. This should give you roughly a 30 minute difference between ...


3

If I want to top a pizza with tomatoes, I generally only add them in the last two minutes of baking. The texture retains some character and they get warm to hot in that amount of time. Basically I just take the pizza out a minute or two before I expect the pizza to be fully cooked, top the pizza with sliced or chopped tomatoes, and stick it back in briefly. ...


3

The purpose of the water is to cook the custard slowly- essentially poaching it. It takes out some insurance against it overheating and breaking. Suspending the cheesecake over the water would not have the same effect- steam can get hotter than the curdling temperature of eggs. It would be a thermal mass that might even out some temperature variation in ...


2

The key is not to roll it too thin nor too thick, it should be as thick as pound coin. Then once you've rolled and put the pastry in tin place back into the fridge for 10-20 minutes. (For Yanks, according to the Royal Mint, a pound coin is 3.15mm, which would be about 1/8")


2

I asked a friend baker to help him for a night, so I could improve my home bread. They use machines to knead the bread as they prepare a lot of dough (25-30 kg of flour at a time). The machines I've seen have two speeds (speed I and speed II) and you can set the timer for both (my friend puts 5 minutes on I then 20 minutes on II) so the mixer switches ...


2

The recipe you've found looks like "crazy cake" or "wacky cake" (or "depression cake"), which is a fairly common egg-free cake. I've made it a number of times for a friend with an egg allergy and it's a very good vegan cake. To make a vanilla version, leave out the cocoa powder and increase the vanilla extract slightly (1.5 teaspoons). There are a wide ...


2

Apple is pretty wet. However, if you're looking at quickbread or muffin recipes (with "wet" and "dry" teams, a la Alton Brown's method), you're better off treating it as a separate addition -- stir the grated apple in after the wet and dry are combined.


2

Wet. You'll notice how much apple juice you end up with when you try to grate an apple.


2

It should be OK, especially if you are purchasing already homogenized almond milk. If you are using homemade almond milk, your glaze won't be perfectly smooth, which may or may not bother you. Your "glaze" is a standard ganache, and it can be, in principle, made with water or any real dairy. The only purpose of the liquid is to change the consistency of ...


2

Have you tried the recipe before? In that case, I would just add almond milk until it reached the same consistency as with heavy cream. If you've done any similar recipes before, I would do the same. Start with maybe 1/4 cup almond milk, and then add more (1tbsp at a time) until you reach the correct consistency to use it as a glaze.


2

Glucose is very expensive, unlike caster sugar (sucrose, also commonly called "table sugar") which does the job, and is much easier to work with. Glucose in the modern kitchen is only really used in meringues.


2

If your crumb is not open you likely either underproofed, your dough is too dry, or you have not opened the dough up by cutting across the top. There are many very good questions about crumb on this site already so I won't go more into that in detail, instead I'll move onto shaping. Bread will spread out and not up unless it's restrained, it's natural for ...


2

Your egg and butter mix has curdled/split you need to put it in a fresh floured bowl and keep mixing till smooth. The brown is, as you mentioned, the brown sugar. Nothing to worry about. Personally I wouldn't use melted butter at all. Rather I would use soft butter. Creaming sugar and butter with melted butter is impossible, especially if the butter is ...


2

you need a Candy thermometer. Sugar needs to be heated to the soft or hard crack temps in order to set as desired. If the sugar does reach the needed temp, then it won't do what you wanted. Hard crack makes hard candies, soft crack makes softer but firm candies.


2

Sunflower seed butter (also called "sunflower butter") is nut-free, and we use it on sandwiches for a friend with a peanut allergy. Its consistency is essentially identical to peanut butter (it sticks well to bread). The biggest issue is that the flavor is somewhat different, although that varies somewhat from brand to brand (one brand, which I ...


2

The most realistic answer, including many correct comments above, is 99.9999..% dead. Yeast and bacteria can sporulate, and spores can survive very harsh conditions. A spore is basically a solid: a cell which has been dried out, packed with sugars and wrapped in an extra thick cell wall. They are not metabolically active, so they can stay that way for ...


2

9 Inches in height does indeed sound like it might not be enough to fit the turkey in at all. You also need to take into consideration that you need some space around the bird to allow the heat to spread evenly through the inside of the oven. I would generally not try to cook something in an oven that it barely fits in to. I did a bit of Googling for you ...


2

Your best bet is to oven dry your tomatoes a bit. This will remove some of the moisture which will mean no puddles on your pizza and more intense tomato flavor. Slice your tomatoes as you would like them, then put them on a baking sheet. Bake them on the lowest possible temperature, opening the oven door every 10 minutes to let the moisture out. How long to ...


2

Like JasonTrue, I add tomato slices at the very end, but generally I broil the tomatoes for the last two minutes in order to zap out moisture quickly. This also works for premade pizzas ordered in.


1

My own experience diverges somewhat from the celebrated Tartine experience. Don't get me wrong, I think it is an amazing book and an amazing bakery...it's just that my experience is not commensurate with the book. First of all, remember that the Tartine bakers who made the starter in the book are, themselves, covered with the natural yeast from working in ...


1

The Cooks Country recipe for Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies is very similar to the one you're using. For the purpose of method comparison and ratios I'm putting it here. I've adjusted what measurements I can to metric. It's behind a paywall, unfortunately but I'll put it here for now... If I should remove it, please let me know. As you may notice everything ...


1

The short: The stretch and fold method is my favorite technique for building big bubbles and strong gluten structure to support a taller loaf of bread. This does require more time and doesn't really work with the stand mixer method. The long: I've found that a loaf spreading rather than "springing" is a function of a number of things. It took me about 6 ...


1

Of course, a grated apple is literally wet, but this has little to do with what "type of ingredient" it is. Kitchen tradition just uses confusing names for the ingredients which go into the two different piles of a two-step method. Dry ingredients don't have to be literally dry, and wet ingredients don't have to be literally wet. I find Erica's approach ...


1

Did you overcook it? Overcooking will often cause eggs to weep not-insignificant amounts of liquid. You can see this trivially if you overcook scrambled eggs - you'll get essentially "egg curds in soup".



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