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7

Adjusting a basic cake (either from a boxed mix or from scratch) is easy if the cake has no or very little flavour of its own. Using a boxed mix might be more difficult because they often have a generous amount of flavouring, typically vanilla, even if it does not explicitly say so on the box front. Check the ingredients list or use a mix you know - a ...


5

The culprit is the pineapple. Raw pineapple contains bromelain, an enzyme that breaks down the protein in your milk, making it bitter. The same principle is applied when bromelain is used as meat tenderizer, either as powdered additive or as fruit-based brine. This process takes a short while, so if you used pineapple in your cereal and eat it right away, ...


5

The difference between gluten and gliadin is the one already explained in your question: Gliadin is a precursor to gluten. You could say that gliadin is to gluten what grains are to porridge. Gluten is the result of glutenin reacting with gliadin in the presence of water, just like porridge is the result of grains "reacting" with milk in the presence of ...


4

What seems a straight cut at the finished batard often started as horizontal deep cut: Hold the blade almost horizontally and make a cut that basically creates a flap of dough or "overlap" of 1.5 cm or more. Oven spring expands the overlap, giving these wide "bands" on the surface. High hydration doughs are a bit "sticky", so vertical cuts are prone to be ...


4

I'll try to break this down into components to make it simpler. If a recipe starts by combining sugar and a solid fat (creaming), this incorporates small air bubbles into the batter which will be seed bubbles for the carbon dioxide produced by chemical leavening. Occasionally, this creaming is used alone for leavening (as in traditional poundcakes). If the ...


4

The rice/beans in this step act as a form of what are known as pie weights. They are used in order to maintain the shape of the crust as it is being baked. If you eliminate the weights during baking, you may encounter undesirable levels of puffing, curling and shrinking. If you'd rather brown the top of the bottom crust while baking, an alternative method ...


4

I agree with many elements of the previous answers -- it could be due to the wet dough "resealing" and/or to the crust hardening too early and preventing further expansion. Doing a more horizontal slash than a vertical one is helpful to get good "ears," and extra moisture will keep the crust softer for a little longer to get more oven spring. Frankly, ...


3

From the Fridge: If you can scoop it (some doughs are too hard), go straight to the oven, though you will likely need to give them a minute longer baking time. This is actually beneficial for some doughs that spread a lot and some recipes actually call for a quick refrigeration. I like to do this with sugar cookies (particularly snickerdoodles) as they ...


3

I think there are two important factors contributing to the different layers from a single batter. The first one is the oven temperature. This magic cake is baked at a lower 300-320F than normal 350-375F oven temperature. This lower temperature allows the starch in the batter to settle before coagulation takes place. This contributes to the bottom dense ...


3

Don't use the pizza stone for cookies. Stones absorb a ton of your oven's heat and will really mess up your baking times. They're designed to be preheated in your oven before you ever put a pizza (or other item) on them. I have never tried it before but you might be able to use the pizza stone if you preheated it but then you have to put your cookies on a ...


3

Nothing is wrong. Continue baking until the toothpick comes out clean. The toothpick test is more definitive than time and temperature (and temperatures are not always what they claim, but don't drastically alter yours without feedback from a RELIABLE oven thermometer..) As I mentioned in a comment on another post, I once had a bad recipe (from a fancy ...


2

You can't really tell by looking, at least not without a known sample of the same brand. The good news is that they are usually interchangeable 1:1. Make a recipe you know well. Does it rise as you expect? Or does it take more or less time? That will most likely give you your answer. If the dough behaves as usual, it's a good bet that you have what you ...


2

Authentic enchiladas are never made with flour tortillas, only corn! Running the tortillas through the hot oil is the traditional way of prepping them for the sauce, but I use a spray oil and set them on a griddle for a few seconds each side. Maybe a minute total. And yes, enchiladas are made differently depending on what region of Mexico the recipe comes ...


2

I have been baking no-knead bread in a heavy porcelain 2-qt.soufflé dish with a glass lid with great success and consistent crust on all sides. My recipe is based on Jim Lahey's magical recipe at http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/11376-no-knead-bread but I use only 1 1/2 cups water, 1 cup white whole wheat flour, 2 cups of bread flour,1 1/4 tsp. ...


2

The problem is that the dough is so moist on most no-knead breads, that the weight of the bread itself will crush down, leading to a difference in texture between the top and bottom of the loaf. I suspect that's the reason that they often tell you to bake them in a pre-heated cast iron pot -- so that the bottom will set before the warmth of the oven causes ...


2

What's happening is that your bread crust is hardening before the expansion is done, and the crust splits at the weakest point. You need moisture to keep it soft and pliable until it stops expanding. The options are: Put a pan of boiling water in your oven at the start of your bake, then remove the pan once your bread stops expanding Put your bread in a ...


2

Chocolate - one of my favorite subjects. The rules for naming chocolate (milk, semi-sweet, bittersweet, dark, extra dark, etc.) vary a bit depending on where you live. However, as a general rule you may substitute semi-sweet chocolate for dark chocolate in a brownie recipe. Semi-sweet chocolate doesn't necessarily have a strict cocoa level requirement, ...


2

No, they are quite different. Barley flour is just the milled grain, but malt has been sprouted so it has much higher enzymatic activity and is much sweeter. It is usually used to precipitate an enzymatic reaction in your bread, which plain barley flour won't do. The recipe may work by just leaving the malt extract out, but it may brown less or rise more ...


1

My response is regarding the Chocolate addition of the three cake flavors. Just keep in mind when adding cocoa powder to a cake recipe (that is assuming it is a scratch recipe), you have to treat the cocoa powder like flour. Adding it to a recipe without subtracting the amount of flour equal to your cocoa powder will result in a dryer cake. Ex. If you have ...


1

To add to Stephie's great post: Strawberry: Strawberry Nesquick Powder can be added to white/vanilla boxed cake mix and it will turn out okay. Just one of those "if you have it on hand, it can work" things. I still prefer just buying a box of strawberry cake though, the flavor comes through stronger. Some recipes that use it: Nesquik Neapolitan Pound ...


1

Peanut butter and cookie butter are quite different in taste: your end-result will be very different as well. To make your own cookie butter, take 66% gingerbread cookies, 33% unsalted butter (left out of the fridge) and mix into a paste. That being said: if you really like peanut butter and you're making this for yourself: go for it: the texture is about ...


1

I think this will be impossible to do accurately, in an oven, without a thermometer. I know you want to estimate, but a few degrees will be the difference between rare and medium rare, for example. Variables include: thickness of steak, internal temperature of steak when you begin, accuracy of your oven temperature, and time. In an oven, even though you set ...


1

When you ask "can I put it in the oven?" you're actually not asking a whole question. Can you put it in the oven? Of course you can. Will anything happen to it and your food that you don't like? Ah, that is the other half, right? What might happen? the pan might warp (if it is thin) the food might scorch or burn (again, more likely if the pan is thin) the ...


1

In my experience you have 3 choices. Lightly spray with water, oil of your liking (olive, canola, grapeseed, or sunflower not vegetable, and lastly, my favorite, brush on lightly sweet unsalted butter. Preheat your over to 350 degrees F (give or take 25 degrees) and do not keep in oven more than 5-7 minutes depending on how round your bread loaf is. ...


1

Here's a recipe from Joy of Kosher. The flours and starches may be a bit hard to find in stores, but they'll be on Amazon. As a matter of fact, the matzo is on Amazon too, but you're right, it's pretty spendy.


1

It is possible that the cake will bake to completion if you wait longer. As Ecnerwal said, it doesn't matter what the book says about time. A cake is done when it is done, and you have to test it for that. "Bake for X minutes" is rarely a good thing to do, it just gives you an initial idea of how long it may take. But there is also a high probability that ...


1

There's only onw way that I know to tell the two apart without using it: granule size Instant is (typically?) smaller than (most?) active dry yeast. However, unless you have a magnifying glass, and maybe some source of yeast for a comparison, it's going to be very, very difficult to tell them apart. I don't know how much granule size is a function of ...


1

The biggest difference that I know about is that mixing all the dry ingredients means that all you have to do is mix in the wet ingredients into the already homogenous mixture, this allows you to blend less to develop a nice and solid gluten matrix. If you add eggs after flour, all the other ingredients then have to be worked into what is already a dough ...


1

I found that by adding some vanilla extract at the end that it added flavor to compensate for less sugar.


1

As you noticed, depending on the size of the lumps, it may not be a problem. Consider how lumpy you can get away with American pancake batter and have them come out fine). As most cakes don't react well to a significant amount of beating (which could develop gluten and cause tunneling in the cake), if the lumps are huge (more than ~5mm / ~1/4" across), I'd ...



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