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18

A syrup is by definition a thick sweet liquid made using sugar. If you are looking to make a thick savory liquid, perhaps you want to look into thickening agents. Starches and plant-based gums are the most common thickening agents. Some examples include: Starches: arrowroot, cornstarch, potato starch, tapioca Plant-base gums: guar gum, xanthum gum, alginin ...


4

The bread gets crispy and "stiff" because it dries up completely. A good toaster should toast a slice of bread quickly so that the exterior is toasted and the interior barely hot; a bad toaster will not be warm enough and will dry up the slice of bread. Same thing when you do an oven baked sandwich, it should be done on high heat so that the bread toasts ...


4

Wrap the sandwich in foil before baking so the moisture stays in the bread. That will prevent it crisping up.


4

I would put the oven on 350, and cook the pork chops according to the recipe. Put in the vegetables for the last 30 minutes. Once the pork chops are done, cover them and let them rest for 15-20 minutes. In the mean time, turn up the temperature to 475 and finish cooking the vegetables for 15-20 minutes. The reason I suggest you adapt the temperature to the ...


4

The baking time doesn't really depend on the weight. It depends on the thickness, and how well done you want it. The FDA recommends cooking to 145F, but you'll probably find it a lot nicer in the 120-130F range. There's a lot of room for personal preference, so it's hard to be too precise. It doesn't need to be held at the temperature for any length of ...


3

Fresh zucchini has a fairly neutral or sometimes "greenish" smell. An acidic or vinager-like smell is an indication of some kind of fermentation that has set in. We can't say what exactly has started to grow (there is lacto-fermentation, which is typically induced on purpose, but also a good chance that your zucchini simply started to decay), but even if ...


2

Yes, me too, I bought mini muffin shaped brownies in a bag and loved the idea so much I wanted to try it myself, so I bought a mini muffin tin especially for that purpose. I read all the answers above to get some guidance. Then I decided to use my favorite brownie recipe from 'Handle the Heat' http://www.handletheheat.com/ultimate-brownies/, with no ...


2

Dust them in flour or powdered sugar. This trick is most commonly used with blueberry muffins.


2

You are spot-on: Whole-grain recipes often use more water and tend to "flow", so using a loaf pan is typically the way to go. Loaf pans alow for a "wetter" dough. It is absolutely possible to bake a free-form whole-wheat loaf, but it needs experience with kneading, resting time and shaping to balance the water content and comparatively low gluten. Also, ...


2

You can make pretty much any bread-like substance into french toast (slice the bread, dip or soak in eggs mixed with a little milk, then shallow-fry in your choice of fat) or bread pudding (cube the bread, if necessary spread it out to dry and/or toast it, pile it in a baking pan, cover in a milk + egg + sweetening mixture, bake). Heck, if you're feeling ...


2

As other answers have said, the result will NOT be (3). The chocolate may melt somewhat during baking, but it will solidify again as it cools. How much it sinks will depend on the thickness of the cake batter -- in some cases it may end up on the bottom, and in other cases it may not sink very much. To achieve your desired result (a "semi-liquid state"), ...


1

Sorry, but it certainly won't be Nr 3. It may be edible, but I don't see why you'll do that instead of making a delicious chocolate cake instead. I have dabbled in high-chocolate recipes, and one of them was for chocolate muffins filled with chopped chocolate (not chocolate chips, but a chopped bar) and glazed with chocolate. The pieces of chocolate were ...


1

Frost it. Most surfaces will be rough when looked at closely enough. Bubbles are introduced when you mix the ingredients together (perhaps more if you use a high-speed machine beater & less if you do it by hand) and as a natural part of baking, from baking soda etc. That's what makes the cakes more light and airy as opposed to thick.


1

Would make awesome bread pudding.


1

Perhaps chia seeds will work for you? When you add water or other liquid, the seeds are transformed into a gelatinous mass. The gelatin will take on the taste of whatever you add to it. A typical ratio is 9:1 (such as 3 cups of water to 1/3 cup chia seeds. To change the consistency, add more or less water (or whatever liquid you want to use).


1

I need this syrup to absorb other flavors as I'm trying to make something savory Rather than a syrup, you seem to be looking for an extract or an infusion. Whether it's vanilla extract, chilli oil or lemon peel oil, they all absorb the flavour or aromas of the compounds without any sweetness. The high temperatures used in baking can affect some of the ...


1

Achieving a syrup-like consistency necessitates something like a sugar. If you boil sugar and water together (simple syrup), you get that consistency. If you boiled it without the sugar, you'd end up with an empty pot after the water had boiled off, but would never see a change in the consistency beyond the water evaporating into steam. It's unclear ...


1

Roast veg at 475 for 30 min first. This can happen earlier and if more than 2 hours in advance refrigerated. Turn oven down. Roast chops. Remove chops. While they are resting return oven to 475 and finish veg for 5 - 10 minutes. ...or...set oven for 350. Roast chops. After 20 minutes add veg to oven. Remove chops when they are done and turn oven up ...


1

In winter when the sun is not too hot, I put the bowl of dough into a glass fish tank which is in the sun. The temperature sits on about 35C (measured with old vacola thermomter).


1

As the commenters have already said, it's hard to know exactly what happened from the information you've given but I'm going to try to give some direction. First, I think the key is in this statement: "the pastry was not all well creamed and looked oily as I placed in oven". This sounds like either the oil (butter, in this case) separated out from the ...


1

Try "frosting" the cookies with plain (unsweetened) peanut butter -- it will offset the sweetness and be delicious!


1

Two suggestions: Try making your crumbs larger. Mix the other ingredients together before adding the crumbs - you want to coat 'em, not soak 'em.


1

Does the recipe call for sugar and pre-baking for the crust, besides the butter? I make cheesecake and the recipes all have a sugar, butter and graham cracker for the crust. The crust is required to be pre-baked, and cooled before filling. I have been lucky with my crusts, unless too thick on the side of a spring pan, they all come out clean.



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