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21

This is what America's Test Kitchen (sorry, paywalled) has to say about it: Sometimes baked potatoes can use a flavor boost. And instead of light and fluffy, most often they are dense and crumbly. We found that baking the potatoes on a bed of salt remedied these problems. Moisture that escaped the potatoes during baking was trapped in the enclosed pan, ...


8

There are many roasting recipes that use a bed or even a dome of salt. This has three effects that I am aware of- 1- It salts the food obviously. This isn't necessarily a reason all by itself. As you noticed salt is just as easily added later. 2- It keeps the food off the pan. In the case of fish this can make for easier service. 3- The salt becomes part ...


6

Sort of. Nut flours are the base of many "flourless" cakes and torts. This one from Joy of Baking is typical, and uses almond flour, which is more common than walnut. Here's one that specifically uses walnut. Note that these are not examples of using nut flours as a substitution for flour, they are recipes developed for nut flours. Both of those recipes ...


5

The best way to prevent cracking is to use a water bath. It will give you consistently perfect results every time. The payoff is worth the extra effort. A cheesecake is a baked custard and controlling the temperature is an important component in uniform cooking. Especially in a thick cheesecake, it is hard to finish cooking the center without the perimeter ...


5

The water bath for a cheesecake is to control the temperature of the thick custard in the springform pan (cheesecake is technically a custard) - you don't need to worry about the moisture of the oven in the absence of a water bath. The equivalency you stated of your pan volumes is a problem, though. The two pans are not as comparable as your volumes ...


4

Overall, you should be fine. The purpose of the dutch oven is trapping moisture and, to some extent, coralling the dough. Keep the following in mind: Make sure your bowl can handle the heat - high heat might cause it to warp. To some extent, this is fine, but if the gaps at the bottom get too big, you won't trap the steam the way you want. But some loss ...


4

Mixing it with milk (or liquid in general) is probably just to remove clumps. It clumps easily, especially when things aren't perfectly airtight (probably more common in your grandmother's time), and mixing in a small amount of liquid is an easy way to make sure it all breaks up. I'm less sure about the alternating. It is pretty common to alternate wet and ...


4

A direct substitution would not work. The cake needs gluten to rise properly. You could replace up to 1/4 the weight of the wheat flour with proper nut flour, though without much fuss. You can't make nut flour by grinding nuts in a blender/food processor. Nut flour is made from the solid material left over after the oil has been pressed from the nuts. ...


4

I assume you are using one of Onida's "convection" microwave oven. Here is a link that describe how to pre-heat your oven. http://foodomania.com/setting-oven-temperature/ In summary: Select the "bake" option. Hit Enter/start once, then choose the temperature. Hit it once again, which will let you select the time. For preheating, leave it at 0:00. Hit ...


4

Your altitude won't matter in your baking. Whatever reason your cakes have for not rising, it's not that you are a tiny bit below sea level. First of all, some personal observations on altitude: I've baked frequently at about 750 meters (let's round it to 2500 feet) and also in my current home at about 130 meters (about 425 feet). The same recipes work ...


3

The biggest issue's your facing is the lack of Gluten which helps trap the air created by the baking powder (Fluffy) and the lack of fat (Moisture). I also sure the sugar would be adding a little extra strength. However the Picture on the original recipe looks dense and dry anyway. I'm assuming you're not using butter purposely, for much the same reason ...


3

On many gas ovens, the calibration of oven temperature is fairly slack - the manual for mine says it can be off be 30 degrees either up or down. Invest in an oven thermometer, preheat your oven until it shows the desired temperature, and see if this gives you better results.


3

I'm looking at the recipe from Karo. The only thing that stands out as potentially being your problem is that the Karo recipe calls for a longer bake time. That recipe gives a final temperature too, 200F (93C). Could it be that your pie is undercooked?


3

This is a very common problem with challah (and any braided bread). As mentioned in comments, it seems likely that the splitting happened in the oven because the bread continued to expand too much after the crust had set. But the braids also complicate the reasons why this may have happened. Here are a few common things to try: Be sure not to braid too ...


2

In Brazil friends use a mix of catchup, mustard and a bit of water to brush over savory dishes, it browns very well and gives a bit of flavor


2

In Cambridge University England where creme brûlée was often made for the High Table the method was to heat the sugar in a saucepan until is caramelised and then poured over which set in a hard crust. This receipe also known as Trinity Creme dating back to the 1600.


2

The soda does a few things: adds moisture to steam the dumplings. cooks down into a syrup to make a sauce. You can typically change out the soda, but you don't want to use a diet soda, as it won't thicken the same and some artificial sweeteners will break down when heated. You don't just want to replace it with sugar water, as the acid in the soda will ...


2

It believe is more a question of temperature than technique. Low and slow typically renders more fat. When I want a maximum amount of fat rendered out I place thinly sliced bacon in a pan and cover with cold water. I then place over medium-high until the water has evaporated and then some depending on how crispy I want the bacon to be.


2

The main reason that you'll see recipes use a specific part of the egg is that the whites and yolks have a very different composition. The whites contain a large number of structural proteins (which is why they can be whipped into stable foams) while the yolks contain most of the fats in the egg. Fats and proteins play very different roles in baking. So, ...


1

It looks as though it baked unequally which could be caused by the dough not being uniformly mixed. Here are some things that I am sure that you already know. (please keep in mind I have never made Challah) Mix your dry ingredients and make sure they are well mixed Mix your wet ingredients and make sure they are well mixed add the wet ingredients to the ...


1

Hello lorraine and welcome to Seasoned Advice! Baking below sea level can require adjustments just as baking at high altitudes can. AS @ElendilTheTall notes, you would need to do the reverse. Please see this from the Essentials of Food Science textbook , page 374. (The link is to a .pdf version.) Altitude-Adjusted Baking As a reference, water ...


1

Sure you can bake crushed peppermint candy into cake. If you're talking about candy cane type candy, you can just crush it and add it to the batter, you wouldn't have to make changes to the recipe at all except the addition. It won't affect the way the cake bakes. The very edges of crushed candy might meld into the cake a bit, but I would expect that effect ...


1

I use a similar device. It was an unused wedding gift that I finally pulled out when my oven door hinge broke... It does have a tendency to overcook the top before the rest is done. It also seems to cook quite unevenly. The way I get around the uneveness is to rotate the top as it's cooking. I've baked a few times in it (bread loaves, scones, muffins and ...


1

I have a new world gas cooker and have found the same problem. I did what James McLeod recommended and bought an oven thermometer and did find the results quite surprising. If I set the gas mark 4 from the off, it took half an hour or more to heat up - and higher temperatures even longer. I now set it to gas mark 9 until it has reached the desired ...


1

First of all, let me be clear that I am no expert on gluten-free cooking. I have worked some with gluten-free flours that are primarily made from rice, but Bob's Red Mill All Purpose Gluten Free Baking Flour has a great reputation. I wouldn't assume that is causing you a problem. Having said that, there were several things I noticed in the recipe you ...


1

Lactic acid is prevalent in sour milk products. Addition of a base such as baking soda would tend to neutralize that acid. So your grandmother's thinking was probably to get ahead of the game a bit by adding the base ingredient to the fresh milk, that is, with the idea in mind that it would keep the milk from souring and from changing the flavor of the ...


1

Not sure,. but have you checked the expiration date on the baking powder you are usig? it is only good for a year or so. Also, if you live in the mountains, the rising of breads and cakes may be affected.


1

I have had luck befriending employees at local pizza joints, and asking if they will order a bucket for me with their next supply shipment (it pays to tip well). Many of the companies that pizza shops order from carry ricotta impastata. It's usually no more than $10 - $20 for a 5lb bucket, and it's perfect for cannoli.


1

I use extra virgin olive oil in cakes all the time because thats usually all I have on hand it it works just fine. Never tasted a difference and never had anyone else taste a difference.


1

I use a coarse (polenta) grind cornmeal, and used to soak the cornmeal overnight like @Rob. Lately I've started pre-cooking the cornmeal instead. Mix the cornmeal 1-1 with boiling water, then microwave 3-4 minutes at 50%. Reduce any water/milk in the final recipe by 1/3.



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