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8

It is a "metric" which requires experience to recognize. First, juices "running" clear doesn't mean that they will flow freely. You have to cut into the meat and look at the juice inside it. Is it clear or not? Second, there is a difference between the feel of meat at different stages of doneness, when you poke it with a fork. If you cannot notice it, ...


8

Yeast dies at about 130-140F. Bread is done baking at 200F or so. Almost all the yeast is dead when the bread is done.


7

The thermal death point for yeast cells is 130° F–140° F (55° C–60° C). Most bread is cooked when the internal temperature reaches 200 F or 100 C. The yeast is dead.


5

The difference between gluten and gliadin is the one already explained in your question: Gliadin is a precursor to gluten. You could say that gliadin is to gluten what grains are to porridge. Gluten is the result of glutenin reacting with gliadin in the presence of water, just like porridge is the result of grains "reacting" with milk in the presence of ...


4

The purpose of the water is to cook the custard slowly- essentially poaching it. It takes out some insurance against it overheating and breaking. Suspending the cheesecake over the water would not have the same effect- steam can get hotter than the curdling temperature of eggs. It would be a thermal mass that might even out some temperature variation in ...


3

The crown is the first thing that sets when you put the bread in the oven. Then, as the center of the loaf heats up, it rises and cracks the top, which has already set. I don't think you can prevent it completely, unless you change your recipe to a denser kind of bread that doesn't rise very much while baking. Otherwise, I find that you can minimise cracking ...


3

There is no good formula to calculate the time needed for baking custards. It depends on way too many variables, most of which you cannot know, and the calculations would be way too complicated too (a system of differential equations, IIRC). So the sensible way to go is to monitor when it is done and remove it exactly then, not to try to predict the time. ...


3

No, there is no substitute for gluten, at all. The gluten + soft flour combination is itself a substitute for bread flour, so if you can get bread flour, as Catija suggested, use it. If you can't, you need another recipe. Especially if your goal is to "not make it complicated", don't use substitutes. Substitutes are always complicated. The easy thing is to ...


3

Disclaimer: I'm not too familiar with the english technical terms, but I'll try and explain what's happening without them. Watch a shaped bread during the final rise: Right after shaping, the interior is still dense because the co2 bubbles from the yeast haven't developed yet. The surface is firm and the shape round(-ish), if you poke gently with a ...


3

If you were going to take the refrigerator approach, it's important to consider when you want to refridgerate it. Immediately after making the dough, stash two of the doughballs in the fridge. Take the first one out after about 25-30 minutes, and the second one out after another 25-30 minutes. This should give you roughly a 30 minute difference between ...


3

The most straightforward approach (especially if you're letting a stand mixer or similar do the work) is to just make three batches, starting the 2nd batch half an hour later than the first, and the third an hour in. Then they should more or less become ready as you're ready to put them in the oven. Upside, it will work exactly as you're used to. Downside, ...


3

If I want to top a pizza with tomatoes, I generally only add them in the last two minutes of baking. The texture retains some character and they get warm to hot in that amount of time. Basically I just take the pizza out a minute or two before I expect the pizza to be fully cooked, top the pizza with sliced or chopped tomatoes, and stick it back in briefly. ...


3

I suspect the cookies are baked now, but still: If you increase the amount of dough, will you be in trouble? You could just add the sugar now, but that will most likely mess up the texture (still, they are chocolate chip cookies, they are always good ^^) Get the sugar you missed the first time. Calculate your recipe down to the smallest amount you can make ...


3

The material you'd want is silicone. For example, there are silicone baking molds. They are often used in professional kitchen settings, but I'm sure you find find some online. Here's an example. There are probably other kinds of silicone containers that can handle oven well, and they can definitely handle microwave.


3

Should be exactly the same - what you are cooking is the same size, how many you are cooking makes no difference. One cupcake or 50 would take the same amount of time to cook, if that's easier to think of. A pan of boiling water in the oven does not care how many ramekins are in it, so long as there's some space between them


3

If the recipe calls for both (and it's a good recipe), it actually needs both. A common reason is that the baking powder provides leavening and the baking soda helps neutralize a bit of the acid. It's a little surprising you're finding that baking soda ruins the taste and not baking powder; baking powder contains baking soda. I wonder if "ruins the taste" ...


3

Don't use the pizza stone for cookies. Stones absorb a ton of your oven's heat and will really mess up your baking times. They're designed to be preheated in your oven before you ever put a pizza (or other item) on them. I have never tried it before but you might be able to use the pizza stone if you preheated it but then you have to put your cookies on a ...


3

Nothing is wrong. Continue baking until the toothpick comes out clean. The toothpick test is more definitive than time and temperature (and temperatures are not always what they claim, but don't drastically alter yours without feedback from a RELIABLE oven thermometer..) As I mentioned in a comment on another post, I once had a bad recipe (from a fancy ...


2

Like JasonTrue, I add tomato slices at the very end, but generally I broil the tomatoes for the last two minutes in order to zap out moisture quickly. This also works for premade pizzas ordered in.


2

Your best bet is to oven dry your tomatoes a bit. This will remove some of the moisture which will mean no puddles on your pizza and more intense tomato flavor. Slice your tomatoes as you would like them, then put them on a baking sheet. Bake them on the lowest possible temperature, opening the oven door every 10 minutes to let the moisture out. How long to ...


2

9 Inches in height does indeed sound like it might not be enough to fit the turkey in at all. You also need to take into consideration that you need some space around the bird to allow the heat to spread evenly through the inside of the oven. I would generally not try to cook something in an oven that it barely fits in to. I did a bit of Googling for you ...


2

The most realistic answer, including many correct comments above, is 99.9999..% dead. Yeast and bacteria can sporulate, and spores can survive very harsh conditions. A spore is basically a solid: a cell which has been dried out, packed with sugars and wrapped in an extra thick cell wall. They are not metabolically active, so they can stay that way for ...


2

you need a Candy thermometer. Sugar needs to be heated to the soft or hard crack temps in order to set as desired. If the sugar does reach the needed temp, then it won't do what you wanted. Hard crack makes hard candies, soft crack makes softer but firm candies.


2

I can offer an example from work experience. When making flatbread, I shared this with a co-worker. We were docking the rounds to keep them from puffing up like little pillows, for this we want flat breads that are flat. Docking correctly allows for small "pillows" of air, yet the overall product does not rise much. I baked one without docking to demonstrate ...


2

Sunflower seed butter (also called "sunflower butter") is nut-free, and we use it on sandwiches for a friend with a peanut allergy. Its consistency is essentially identical to peanut butter (it sticks well to bread). The biggest issue is that the flavor is somewhat different, although that varies somewhat from brand to brand (one brand, which I ...


2

The biggest difference that I know about is that mixing all the dry ingredients means that all you have to do is mix in the wet ingredients into the already homogenous mixture, this allows you to blend less to develop a nice and solid gluten matrix. If you add eggs after flour, all the other ingredients then have to be worked into what is already a dough ...


2

I don't believe you would want to try to leaven bread with beer only, though you could certainly use it as a flavoring. First, the amount of yeast still present in a brewed batch of beer is very low. Beers that have been bottle carbonated (or bottle conditioned) will have more than others but, particularly with high gravity beers (beers with a lot of ...


2

You can't really tell by looking, at least not without a known sample of the same brand. The good news is that they are usually interchangeable 1:1. Make a recipe you know well. Does it rise as you expect? Or does it take more or less time? That will most likely give you your answer. If the dough behaves as usual, it's a good bet that you have what you ...


1

I think you're conflating syrups and extracts. Extracts are some flavoring oil plus alcohol. For example, Vanilla Extract: Vanilla extract is a solution containing the flavor compound vanillin as the primary ingredient. Pure vanilla extract is made by macerating and percolating vanilla beans in a solution of ethyl alcohol and water. In the United ...


1

If you increase the volume of a closed container which can't expand anymore, it will cause the container to break because there is no more space to expand unless the container gives way. This is what happens with bread. The top becomes fixed in shape as it looses moisture and looses its ability to expand. When the inside part expands, the lack of space will ...



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