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11

Absolutely not. There are a lot of tricks to get good thick (or thin) pizza with oven temperatures under 300C (572F). The people at Serious Eats have researched the problem at great length and with excellent results. Few home ovens reach 300C. I made this pizza last weekend using the recipe in the above link, my oven's top temperature is 274C (525F): ...


7

Thin pizzas are traditionally baked in extremely hot ovens for short times, thick pizzas need lower temperatures for much longer times. Keep in mind that oven temperature is only one factor, as important if not more so is the quality of the ingredients and the techniques used in preparing them. A good base, good tomato sauce, and good toppings will make a ...


6

The purpose of the beer (and the vinegar) in this case is to add some of the malty, fermenty flavors typical of longer-fermented or sourdough breads. You can either leave it out and replace it with an equal quantity of water or use a non-alcoholic beer The carbonation from the beer might add a little extra lift at the start to establish some air cells and ...


5

No, you shouldn't be adding butter at this stage, it will take too much kneading and undo the rising. Whatever it is you were baking, just go ahead and bake it this way. There are many breads which don't use any fat at all. The taste will be different than with butter, but it will still be a good bread.


4

It is absolutely safe to do so... For most foods, I would say that there is no reason not to. If they are savory muffins like corn muffins to be served with the roast, I would not hesitate at all. For sweet goods, with a high amount of butter or oil, there is some small risk of absorbing aromas. I would generally segregating strongly aromatic foods for ...


3

Undercooked cookies are still edible, don't toss them! Some people prefer chocolate chip cookies underdone, but you can't know for sure that the egg has fully cooked (although that wouldn't bother me one bit unless the source was shaky). If you must have them crisper, or if the remote possibility that the egg is unsafe concerns you, then yes, go ahead and ...


2

You cannot simply replace sugar with fresh fruit in baking recipes. Sugar is, well, 100% sugar. Fruit is mostly water, on the order of 70-90% depending on the particular fruit in question. The remainder is usually sugars, starches and pectins for the most part. Any recipe not specifically designed to be sweetened with fruit is going to fail ...


2

America's Test Kitchen (AKA Cook's Illustrated) took on exactly this issue. They were looking for both that chewy texture and that shiny, crusty, crackly top. Good boxed brownie mixes achieve those qualities, but lack the intense chocolaty taste of homemade. They tried different mixing methods. They tried melting the butter, creaming the butter, and ...


2

The simple answer is no, it wouldn't work. Vegetable shortening is 100% fat. Peanut butter contains significant amounts of protein and starch, and carries a profound peanut flavor. These are going to drastically change any recipe it is used in lieu of shortening. If you desire lower fat recipes, I suggest you look specifically for recipes designed with ...


2

In addition to the advantages already listed, starting the bacon in an un-preheated oven also saves the energy that it takes to pre-heat, while still taking the same amount of time to cook. Thus, you save overall time, since you don't have to wait for the oven to come up to temperature. Of course, if your oven is already warm from previous use, you can also ...


1

The exact reason depends on the particular ingredient and recipe. Some common ones include: General temperature. By having all of the ingredients at room temperature, the time it takes to bake the overall item(s) is easier to predict, leading to better, more consistent outcomes. Egg whites Egg whites form the protein network that creates the foam when ...


1

Flour is basically a mix of gluten and starch (about 10% gluten to 90% starch for all purpose flour, the ratio varies for other types). Whenever a baked good asks for the addition of pure starch, it is made under the assumption that you have no easy access to low-gluten flour types. Its purpose is to reduce the gluten-to-starch ratio. Gluten makes dough ...


1

I've found that beer in breads (and crusts, to be more specific) gives it a very light, airy quality. I don't know enough to speak authoritatively, but I'd guess the yeast (or whatever) in it helps its levity - which makes it so you don't have to knead it as much. So I don't know for sure - but I'd guess that it has a functional purpose other than just ...


1

Rather than a substitution what you really need to ask is what changes you need to make if you leave the cocoa powder out. Vanilla extract is a very concentrated liquid and the recipe already calls for 1 teaspoon of it, so adding more vanilla may not even be necessary depending on the result you are trying to get. Maybe an extra 1/2 tsp. Cocoa powder is ...


1

The reason subway has to "heat" the flatbread is to make it soft. If you want it toasted you get it with the meat and cheese toasted under a hotter setting that actually toasts it. When subway released the flatbread they understood some people don't want there sub toasted so in order to comply with this request they have the option of just heating the ...


1

I work at a charcuterie but we are partnered with a professional baker who provides us with macarons to sell in our store. From your picture, it looks like the tops of your macarons have deflated. I wouldn't decrease your temperature, but instead increase it. Our most common problem was deflation and often times our temperature wasn't high enough in the ...


1

First of all, are the ingredient lists the same? Sometimes with packaged foods, there are specific differences in formulas for different product lines. If we assume that the formula is the same, it could have more to do with the consistency of the ingredients. The ones that come in a pan get stored in the right shape and probably don't get handled the same ...


1

Melting the butter and mixing it with milk or other liquid ingredients is almost always done as part of the muffin method, where a muffin, cake or quick bread batter is formed by mixing dry ingredients together, wet ingredients together, and then quickly combining the two. In practice, the butter is not going to mix with the milk. It is going to mostly ...


1

This could help. It is a nice write up of brioche bun development from Chefsteps: http://www.chefsteps.com/recipe-development/brioche-burger-bun#/brioche-buns-development-brief



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