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5

Yes, you can whip egg whites (or whipped cream, or....) by hand. There are a few things you need: a reasonably large bowl a good, sturdy whisk, again not too small proper technique a good amount of ellbow grease patience It will typically take longer than when using a mixer (for beginners, I've seen pros that could keep up with any measly old mixer, ...


4

You say: Also I have an electric mixer in which I usually whisk eggs for a cake. Why not use it? There's nothing special about an electric egg beater, really. You'll find it much less strenuous than hand-whisking, even if it's a hand mixer rather than a stand mixer.


4

I'd recommend freezing them unbaked. The crumb is a lot more delicate once they're baked and more susceptible to moisture migration, leading to them being soggy or stale (or both! at the same time!) when thawed. Scones, being relatively low moisture and not containing yeast, actually freeze quite well and can usually go straight from the freezer to the oven. ...


3

With your plans, you have encoutered some questions and problems. Let's tackle one after another: Alcohol boiling off Although often repeated and assumed due to the lower boiling point of alcohol vs. water, alcohol will not boil off completely. Even after a long boil not only traces, but a significant amount of alcohol remains. There is a question and a ...


3

First, the short answer: There's a lot of erroneous information circulating concerning glass bakeware, and very few reliable sources or repeatable experiments seem to be cited. In general, I'd say that the variance among different metal pans of different materials, colors, thicknesses, and coatings will have more significant effects than the difference ...


2

You haven't really explained what you did, so it's a bit hard to give useful advice on how to overcome a failure, but my patê à choux pastries have always come out sized proportional to the amount of pastry I use. Since choux doesn't tend to spread much, make sure your base is close to the diameter you're after; I just pipe inside out, creating a connected ...


1

I am not familiar with your specific recipe, but I usually use yeast in bread or pizza dough. You can use dried and fresh yeast, either works for me. You need to let it rise for an hour or so when you prepared the dough. You could put it all mixed together in a bowl and put that in warm water. That will speed up the rising process.


1

This is difficult without knowing what sort of oven you have but here are some basic notes that will help you get started. Many modern ovens will alert you to when they are at temperature. Every oven is different. My oven takes about 5 minutes to preheat but my dad's takes about 10. If your oven doesn't have an alert, - and, honestly, even if it does - ...


1

Well, by far the "lowest and slowest" technique out there is sous vide. (Basically, cooking in a precisely controlled temperature water bath.) The typical way to do this involves three steps: Marinate, rub, and/or smoke your meat (optional). Smoking is often preferred since the meat won't go on a grill for a long time, and it helps get that rich flavor ...



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