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16

In my experience, it doesn't really save money, but it's still worth it because it's fresh and better than store-bought at the same price. For me, 1kg of all purpose flour yields 1.6kg of bread (as two loaves). Each 13x4x4" (Pullman) loaf weighs about 800 grams after cooling and yields between 24-30 slices depending on thickness. The cost per loaf is under ...


14

Philadelphia Brand ingredients: Pasteurized Milk and Cream, Whey Protein Concentrate, Salt, Carob Bean Gum, Xanthan Gum, Cheese Culture. Organic Valley Cream Cheese (don't know which brand you used) ingredients: Organic Pasteurized Milk and Organic Cream, Cheese Culture, Salt, Organic Locust Bean Gum. Nancys Organic Cream Cheese ingredients: Organic ...


12

Since raisins are a type of dried fruit, they don't have a lot of moisture left in them. Heat from baking with just make them drier, eventually resulting in that chewy, not particularly pleasant lump. The internal raisins are more protected from the heat, so they stay the same consistency. One solution may be to soak the raisins in water, fruit juice, or ...


8

It would depend greatly on the recipe used. However, for example, this recipe from Jamie Oliver for "Basic Bread" yields 1 loaf of bread and utilizes 1kg of flour. Additionally if you are comparing for economic reasons, you'd also need to take into account the cost for yeast, salt and any enrichments (egg, sugar, etc as specified by recipe). The average ...


8

The recipe might accidentally rely on the presence or absence of a thickener, gelling agent, stabiliser, emulsifier, or pH modifier that is contained in certain brands. Or, it could rely on the exact moisture content of that brand, or on modalities of how it was processed - homogenization of dairy ingredients used, heat treatment, particle size of solids ...


7

The easiest solution is to use different cheeses. Most commercial pizzerias, like Domino's or Pizza Hut do not use expensive cheeses like Parmesean or fresh mozzerella... they use crappy cheese designed to be stretchy and to stay that way when warm instead of hot. In general, they use part-skim mozzarella, which is often sold pre-shredded and in hard blocks ...


7

In order to understand what's going wrong you need to understand what's happening in the oven. Bread rises in the oven because the yeast gets a boost from the heat before it is killed by it, and by the expansion of gases (O2, CO2, and water vapor) trapped in the dough. Well-developed gluten will trap air well, under-developed gluten will allow it to ...


6

It's a tradition in Scotland as well. A boiled suet fruit cake Clootie Dumpling is when eaten at Christmas especially has small coins and charms included in the mixture. The mixture is put in a clean muslin cloth and boiled. Although traditionally eaten at Christmas the pudding is also eaten at other times but the coins/charms are only used at Christmas. ...


5

Yes, this is definitely a Greek tradition, a New Year's bread called vasilopita Vasilopita (Greek: Βασιλόπιτα, Vasilópita, lit. '(St.) Basil-pie' or 'king pie', see below) is a New Year's Day bread or cake in Greece and many other areas in eastern Europe and the Balkans which contains a hidden coin or trinket which gives good luck to the receiver, like ...


4

My dough whisk, Vera, is one of the most useful utensils in my kitchen. There's something magical about the loops that cause whatever you're mixing to combine easier and faster than using a spoon. Not to be confused with a wire whisk, a dough whisk won't whip very much air into the mixture — unless you want it to. For making your shortbread, operate it ...


4

As long as the eggs aren't expired you should be fine. I've made creme brulee many times with both fresh eggs and not so fresh with similar results.


4

For this recipe, the most likely issues are: overbaking and wrong oven temperature Simply put, removing too much humidity during the baking process. Wrong oven temperature can aggravate this problem, especially if it is too low (to hot = burned edges and wet center). over-mixing This recipe is very sensitive to overmixing, which means forming gluten ...


3

Since this is a bread you are accustomed to baking, you know how the dough should feel. You will either have to change the amount of liquid or the amount of some other ingredient(s) - probably the flour. I suggest that you start by adding some of the flour to the oat flour and all of the wet ingredients. Then, continue adding more flour until the dough ...


3

I assume you're trying to extend shelf life for a couple of days, not weeks. One possibility is dough enhancers, many of which improve shelf life. Most can be very easily incorporated into an existing bread machine recipe. There are a variety of possibilities, and you can also buy commercially available dough enhancers that combine various helpful additives ...


3

There is a similar tradition in Bulgaria. On the Christmas Eve is served Christmas bread with a coin inside it. Then everyone takes a piece of the bread. The one who finds the coin inside his piece will be very lucky and happy during the next year. The Christmas bread can be in different shape with variety of ornaments and symbols. According to the old ...


2

I usually add about 2 tablespoons of mashed potatoes to my bread recipes (3 cups of flour). I haven't tried it with potato flakes or potato flour. If you put too much the dough will be very sticky and the bread dense


2

The best way to achieve what you are looking for is to lower the temp and lengthen the baking time. Lowering the temp will slow the edges from getting burned while the center is allowed to continue to cook. Allow the top of the cookie to brown before removing from the oven. For soft cookies, the moment it starts to turn brown is the moment you are just a ...


2

Shortbread should be crisp and crumbly, using a mixer to mix the flour in will work the glutens in the flour and make the dough stretchy which is not what you want. Using a spoon (wooden or not doesn't make any difference) or scraper will help limit the working of the dough. So cream the butter and sugar with the mixer for sure, but then stir in the flour ...


2

Basic bread requires flour, water, salt and yeast (nothing more). The salt and yeast contribution to the weight is negligible. Water, in my experience, shall be - before cooking - about 70% in weight with respect to flour; the actual quantity depends mainly on the kind of flour, but 70% is a reasonable average estimate. Loss of total weight during cooking is ...


2

flour/water : 100:50 - 100:65 as you like the dough -> 1kg flour : 1,5kg -1,65kg dough. You have 10% loss of weight by backing. Thats all.


2

You will want to scale the fish, definitely. If you don't the result will be absolutely awful as the scales will come off in cooking and get all over the place. They won't stay attached to the skin for easy removal. Other than gutting and scaling (and a thorough wash) preparation before cooking depends on the effect you want on the table, and how much you ...


2

Balancing the sweetness with something that adds textural or flavor depth can mitigate the cloying, one-note sweet sensation. Try adding ground nuts - not too much, otherwise you will mess with the recipe chemistry. Try sour (or perceived sour) flavorings like citrus zest or mahlep. Amchur or Anardana could work too, given they are solid sour flavorings, ...


2

Leaving the bread out uncovered overnight is likely one of the larger issues with staling. All bread will start to stale immediately after it's come out of the oven -- commercial bread simply has other ingredients to help slow this effect. (and I know we've had a question on this topic) They also package the bread in plastic to hold moisture near the loaf ...


2

The lack of vent holes would have been a problem. Vent holes allow steam to escape, reducing the amount of internal moisture. This moisture will both prevent the crust from cooking fully through, and will cause the crust to soften as after it comes out of the oven. That's not to say that there wasn't also some other problem, just this is one thing that ...


2

Typically, yes. (it depends on the exact recipe). There's actually a whole category of crafts / gifts for various 'mixes in a jar' where you mix up all of the dry goods, put it in a jar, decorate it, and label it w/ instructions on what else needs to be done. update: To clarify -- if the recipe calls for mixing all of the dry ingredients together before ...


1

One "hack" to try is to put a larger glass baking dish on top (e.g. 9"x13" over an 8"x8"). It is heavy enough to make a moderately decent seal.


1

Probably there is no such way, at least not one that's worthwhile. First, there is the problem that designing a recipe well is a skill which very few people have. Experienced bakers can progress to it, but inexperienced ones can make 100 trials but won't understand what went wrong with any of them. Unless you're in it for the fun of it, it's easier to find ...


1

Do you use any fats in your mix? On this page there is the suggestion that adding some fat -- say, 50g of butter or oil -- can extend shelf life. Fats (butter, oils, milk, eggs). Fats enrich and flavor the bread. They also soften the dough and preserve it: whereas a fat-free loaf of bread like a French bread goes stale after only a few hours, a loaf of ...


1

In the UK we don't have Earth Balance, and often DF margerine on it's own is too soft, even when chilled: I find a mix of dairy-free margarine and vegetable shortening works - I've not made pastry yet, however for "buttercream" icing I do a 50/50 mixture. Hope this helps!


1

There are good quality vegan margarines (Earth balance, Alsan) on the market nowadays, often they are of the interesterified instead of the hydrogenated variety. They are designed to behave and taste similar to butter instead of (as many cheap margarines seem to do) staying spreadable at temperatures where butter would be very firm. Unlike pure coconut or ...



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