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10

It is no different from other prototyping processes or exploratory research. You are not confirming a scientific hypothesis here, you are actively searching. So the most important thing is: fail fast. So, for the question of mini batches vs. large batches, you certainly need mini batches. And in cooking it is more important than in other fields, as humans ...


3

With any experimental design, controlling the variables is a key problem, and this cuts two ways for your question. Mini-Batches increase the relative effect of measurement errors and/or how critical the measuring is in general; but they reduce the impact of weather conditions such as humidity and temperature that will vary from day to day. A full-scale ...


3

I'm not sure about blending the cornmeal, though I would be interested to hear if it works, but if all you want is to try and keep the batter from falling off, you might try changing the hotdogs instead. Hotdogs have a smooth texture, there's not a lot for the batter to grip onto. You might try mechanically roughening the surface, using crisscross ...


2

The "brand" seems remarkably shy - no website could be found for them, and no vendor admits what the non-stick coating actually is in this case. It appears (via internet picture) visually similar to the coating on "Bakers Secret" which is a silicone coating on steel. That works for a while, longer if you are careful to wash it promptly. But without a vendor ...


2

It is simply teflon. It can be colored in any color, but the lighter colors will darken with overheating, so it is convenient to coat a pan in an "overheated" color from the beginning. The manufacturer here chose to use a different color.


1

Yes, perfectly fine to freeze it. It will last approximately forever, frozen. Related: How long can you keep chocolate in the freezer?


1

Maybe a long shot, but did you by any chance just make this recipe up yourself? Or modify a good recipe? This happens to my baking experiments a lot; I think when my batter starts out too liquid & doesn't cook all the way in the middle of the pan, or it has too much leavening (baking soda/powder) which causes over fluffing, then sink-age when the baked ...


1

You need to start (and maybe stay) from low temperature. This way the moisture will leave the cookie. If you start with high temperature you making a firm skin that won't let the moisture leave.


1

You need to skip the milk in the cookie recipe. If you want to add dairy, you can put dry milk or cream cheese. Milk isn't for cookies.



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