Hot answers tagged

37

The first yeast was "just there" - in the environment, everywhere. People discovered very early on that leaving the dough (or just a flour-water slurry) out would lead to it getting "sour" and "bubbly", thus leavening the bread: What we today call sourdough is in fact a mixture of yeasts and bacteria (lactobacillae). The origins of bread-making are so ...


27

Couldn't I just use a lower temperature setting? No, you can't. Ovens are very bad at keeping a constant temperature. Not only is the oven thermostat usually off, it also cycles around its mean temperature a lot. So your food is subjected to constantly changing temperature. If you were to set your oven to 100C, you 1) won't get really 100C, and 2) ...


21

This step is not about food safety, it's about consistency and in fact about three properties of your jam: Jam comes in a wide variation of consistencies, one parameter is "stiffness", another "water content" and a third "smoothness". In baking, you want smooth (no lumps) jam that is speadable enough to form a thin layer (especially if used as a "glue"), ...


20

It is related to air current. A draft is a localised current of air, usually indoors, the kind that might leak through a door left ajar. Bread recipes advise using a draft free place for rising A) to prevent poorly covered dough from drying out and B) to make sure the temperature remains warm enough for the quick rise most simple recipes call for.


18

A syrup is by definition a thick sweet liquid made using sugar. If you are looking to make a thick savory liquid, perhaps you want to look into thickening agents. Starches and plant-based gums are the most common thickening agents. Some examples include: Starches: arrowroot, cornstarch, potato starch, tapioca Plant-base gums: guar gum, xanthum gum, alginin ...


17

In my experience, it doesn't really save money, but it's still worth it because it's fresh and better than store-bought at the same price. For me, 1kg of all purpose flour yields 1.6kg of bread (as two loaves). Each 13x4x4" (Pullman) loaf weighs about 800 grams after cooling and yields between 24-30 slices depending on thickness. The cost per loaf is under ...


16

These days, wedding cakes can be pretty much any kind of cake. A traditional wedding cake is certainly more or less a Christmas cake - a dense, dark, 'matured' fruit cake with marzipan and royal icing. However, nowadays you will find that anything goes - flavoured sponges are extremely popular. The main criteria is that the cake should be sufficiently dense ...


14

Philadelphia Brand ingredients: Pasteurized Milk and Cream, Whey Protein Concentrate, Salt, Carob Bean Gum, Xanthan Gum, Cheese Culture. Organic Valley Cream Cheese (don't know which brand you used) ingredients: Organic Pasteurized Milk and Organic Cream, Cheese Culture, Salt, Organic Locust Bean Gum. Nancys Organic Cream Cheese ingredients: Organic ...


13

Since raisins are a type of dried fruit, they don't have a lot of moisture left in them. Heat from baking with just make them drier, eventually resulting in that chewy, not particularly pleasant lump. The internal raisins are more protected from the heat, so they stay the same consistency. One solution may be to soak the raisins in water, fruit juice, or ...


12

You can't really substitute double cream for butter as the fat/water ratio is different - it's basically just too wet. However, guess what they make butter out of - cream! If you 'over whip' cream, the fat separates from the liquid leaving you with fresh butter. Naturally this is easy if you have an electric mixer. If you're doing it by hand, prepare to be ...


11

You are creating a bain-marie. It is used to gently heat the food and to stop the food scorching or boiling. When used for custards it stops them curdling. For cheesecakes the technique is used to stop the centre cracking.


10

I have been making cinnamon rolls professionally for 10 years. I have done both traditional cinnamon rolls and gluten-free cinnamon rolls, and the only time xanthan gum was included was in the dough for the gluten-free rolls. Normally the inside is gooey because the butter and sugar (and some moisture that the sugar pulls out of the dough) combine and form ...


9

If it is sparking then it is not microwave safe and you should get your money back. No change of mode is going to help, it is the material and construction of the pan which is the problem.


9

It would depend greatly on the recipe used. However, for example, this recipe from Jamie Oliver for "Basic Bread" yields 1 loaf of bread and utilizes 1kg of flour. Additionally if you are comparing for economic reasons, you'd also need to take into account the cost for yeast, salt and any enrichments (egg, sugar, etc as specified by recipe). The average ...


8

Yeast dies at about 130-140F. Bread is done baking at 200F or so. Almost all the yeast is dead when the bread is done.


8

It is a "metric" which requires experience to recognize. First, juices "running" clear doesn't mean that they will flow freely. You have to cut into the meat and look at the juice inside it. Is it clear or not? Second, there is a difference between the feel of meat at different stages of doneness, when you poke it with a fork. If you cannot notice it, ...


8

Crème Pâtissière is a thicker mixture, and is usually used for filling a pastry. It would be rolled into, or injected into something that would then be baked. As such, it needs to be thicker, so as not too leak out, and usually more flavourful, as it is the main flavour in the pastry. Crème Anglaise is what the English would call custard. It is usually ...


8

Let's do some physics again: All culinary aspects aside, a roast is a (more or less) solid "blob" with a certain mass and volume. To get the roast to the desired doneness, you want to reach a certain temperature at the center of the meat. The crucial properties are the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of your meat or, very simply put, how fast ...


8

The recipe might accidentally rely on the presence or absence of a thickener, gelling agent, stabiliser, emulsifier, or pH modifier that is contained in certain brands. Or, it could rely on the exact moisture content of that brand, or on modalities of how it was processed - homogenization of dairy ingredients used, heat treatment, particle size of solids ...


7

The thermal death point for yeast cells is 130° F–140° F (55° C–60° C). Most bread is cooked when the internal temperature reaches 200 F or 100 C. The yeast is dead.


7

Adjusting a basic cake (either from a boxed mix or from scratch) is easy if the cake has no or very little flavour of its own. Using a boxed mix might be more difficult because they often have a generous amount of flavouring, typically vanilla, even if it does not explicitly say so on the box front. Check the ingredients list or use a mix you know - a ...


7

This answer touches on the problem: Superfine sugar will dissolve too quickly and won't allow enough air to be incorporated. Powdered or superfine sugar will still give you the same sweetness property as the granulated sugar. However, the step of creaming butter and (granulated) sugar is not just for mixing. It also incorporates some air into the fat; ...


7

Commercial butter has about 80% fat, 15% water and 5% solids. Depending on where you are located double cream has 48% fat (UK), 40% (Canada) and the remaining fraction is obviously water and little solids. Supposed, you need 100g butter in your receipe. This means that the dough will have 80g fat and 15g water (for a simple calculation I omit the content ...


7

You cannot directly use Bisquick in place of AP flour. According to the company web site and Wikipedia, Bisquick consists of bleached all-purpose flour with several other ingredients, including fat (shortening), leavening (baking powder), sugar, and salt. It is essentially a self-rising flour with added fat. Because of all of the extra ingredients, it will ...


7

Keep the oven temperature the same, as a good hot oven is necessary for the loaf to 'spring' (ie inflate somewhat). Just reduce the cooking time accordingly.


7

Yes, you can refrigerate bread dough, and in fact you will probably find that it will give you better, tastier results, because the yeast has more time to do its work. Any bread baker worth his salt (flour?) will tell you that a slow, cold rise is better than a fast, warm one. You should refrigerate the dough immediately after mixing, not after a rise. ...


7

The easiest solution is to use different cheeses. Most commercial pizzerias, like Domino's or Pizza Hut do not use expensive cheeses like Parmesean or fresh mozzerella... they use crappy cheese designed to be stretchy and to stay that way when warm instead of hot. In general, they use part-skim mozzarella, which is often sold pre-shredded and in hard blocks ...


7

In order to understand what's going wrong you need to understand what's happening in the oven. Bread rises in the oven because the yeast gets a boost from the heat before it is killed by it, and by the expansion of gases (O2, CO2, and water vapor) trapped in the dough. Well-developed gluten will trap air well, under-developed gluten will allow it to ...


6

If you had the same problem with different recipes, it's probably caused by technique. The key to round buns is surface tension. If the skin is taut, the expanding gas will cause the bun to expand like a balloon instead of "flowing" sideways. When shaping your buns, make sure you create tension by either repeatedly folding the outer edge inwards or by using ...


6

The purpose of the water is to cook the custard slowly- essentially poaching it. It takes out some insurance against it overheating and breaking. Suspending the cheesecake over the water would not have the same effect- steam can get hotter than the curdling temperature of eggs. It would be a thermal mass that might even out some temperature variation in ...



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