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35

No peeling is needed. A good wash and proper cooking will handle all of your food safety needs.


28

Okay, I did some more thorough searching and found Beki Cook's donut frosting recipe. Apparently my mistake was that I was letting them (the doughnuts) cool off, and according to the article: Glaze is the easiest way to sugar-up a donut. But there are a few things you need to remember. First and foremost... only glaze donuts when they're warm. If you do ...


21

This is what America's Test Kitchen (sorry, paywalled) has to say about it: Sometimes baked potatoes can use a flavor boost. And instead of light and fluffy, most often they are dense and crumbly. We found that baking the potatoes on a bed of salt remedied these problems. Moisture that escaped the potatoes during baking was trapped in the enclosed pan, ...


18

The reasons people still roast whole birds are: Roasting a whole chicken is easier than butterflying it. While it's not tough to butterfly a chicken many people don't know how, or don't want the cleanup It's less prep time to roast a whole chicken. If you are busy you can have it from the fridge to the oven in less than a minute, while butterflying or ...


15

First off, do not use sand paper. The sandpaper grit will wear off over use (which is it's function) and possibly remain in the dough. You don't want anyone eating sand paper grit, and I'm not even sure what it would do. It might even be a hospital-level problem if the grit gets embedded in any digestive tract tissues and causes inflammation. Ugg. Please ...


14

Short answer for a short question: Probably. Assuming you're using it to line the pan, paper might leave the cookies less browned than you'd like, but it will provide a physical barrier between cookies and pan just fine. If you're using it to cover the bar cookies to keep them warm, foil works a lot better than paper. If you're cooking the cookies in a ...


11

Absolutely not. There are a lot of tricks to get good thick (or thin) pizza with oven temperatures under 300C (572F). The people at Serious Eats have researched the problem at great length and with excellent results. Few home ovens reach 300C. I made this pizza last weekend using the recipe in the above link, my oven's top temperature is 274C (525F): ...


11

Absolutely no peeling necessary. In addition to the above advice, if you (or anyone else) is overly concerned about 'germs' and the like on the skin, use a small plastic-bristled scrub brush to clean the potatoes properly under running water. I usually don't, unless they are really gritty from the field or have huge divots on the surface where water may not ...


11

In his book On Food and Cooking, Harold McGee writes regarding beans and legumes: Plain salt at a concentration around 1% (10 g/L, or 2 teaspoons/qt) speeds cooking greatly, apparently because the sodium displaces magnesium from the cell-wall pectins and so makes them more easily dissolved. Baking soda at 0.5% (1 teaspoon/qt) can reduce the ...


10

Plain pencil is what is normally used. The trick is that you draw on the reverse side of the parchment, and then flip it over so the food is on the non-written on side.


10

I don't know much of the science behind the super-soft bread on supermarket shelves, but I can give some insight into the history that led to it becoming so ubiquitous in the US. The idea that whiter breads are classier than darker breads goes all the way back to the 5th century BC. The belief that white bread was superior to dark bread, a common theme ...


10

I'd take a different approach entirely. Throw out the cookies, or at least don't eat them. Compost them, or build a cookie fort for small mammals, or make something decorative, or play cookie frisbee (probably outdoors). Use your imagination. Consider this failure a learning experience – remember to actually learn from it – and try again.


10

To make your own part-baked rolls, you have to actually part-bake them, not just freeze the shaped dough. You can freeze shaped dough, but you then need to fully thaw it and let it 'wake up' again before baking. You need to part bake at a relatively low temperature so that the dough springs and sets, but a crust does not form. About 20 minutes at ...


10

Rounding to the nearest 10C is more accurate than your thermostat probably is anyway (don't round up, round to the nearest). Conversion isn't your issue, your thermostat is much more likely your culprit. Use an oven thermometer, not your dial. And keep in mind that ovens hover above and below their set temperature by switching on and off. Use Google or ...


9

There are many roasting recipes that use a bed or even a dome of salt. This has three effects that I am aware of- 1- It salts the food obviously. This isn't necessarily a reason all by itself. As you noticed salt is just as easily added later. 2- It keeps the food off the pan. In the case of fish this can make for easier service. 3- The salt becomes part ...


8

Folding is almost always done when you have one ingredient like whipped cream, egg whites, meringue, or similar which has had a lot of air whipped into it, and you are incorporating that with another ingredient. The folding motion is meant to disturb the whipped ingredient is little as possible, in order to retain the whipped in air, and thus the volume of ...


8

All other factors - ambient temperature, humidity, oven temp, etc - accounted for, the specific time of the day doesn't make any difference, whatsoever. But alas, this is the real world, we don't hold other factors constant. Most likely your room is slightly warmer and potentially your room could be a bit more humid in the afternoon. These could lead to a ...


8

There's nothing wrong with your conversions, they were fine. What you may not have considered is: Convection versus non-convection ovens. When you see a recipe in F it's most likely from the US, and in the US convection ovens are rare. Convection ovens cook with more intensity than non-convection ovens as the fan blows hot air, so when using a recipe for a ...


8

If your goal is to cook your chicken relatively quickly, the only reason to keep it whole is for presentation/appearance and to avoid cutting it up. (For example, I know some people who simply hate handling raw meat, and I imagine for them that the task of butterflying is not only laborious but distressing.) From my perspective, you can save so much ...


7

In case you are interested, the magic comes at least partly from the milk. I accidentally forgot to add it (but other than that, I followed the recipe to the letter), and I ended up with a regular vanilla cake, no layers at all. I imagine this cake part should've been the (partly) the upper layer. As milk is heavier than some of the other ingredients, it ...


7

Use the butter; historically margarine is a simulated butter in the first place, and you will probably get a better product, since butter tastes much better. You could use the shortening, but it will not help the flavor at all, and doesn't have the approximately 18% water that butter and margarine do, although this usually doesn't matter in a graham cracker ...


7

Thin pizzas are traditionally baked in extremely hot ovens for short times, thick pizzas need lower temperatures for much longer times. Keep in mind that oven temperature is only one factor, as important if not more so is the quality of the ingredients and the techniques used in preparing them. A good base, good tomato sauce, and good toppings will make a ...


7

They are probably unsalvageable, sorry. There are two possibilities for the bad taste. If you didn't have much fat in the dough, then what you are getting is probably an alkali taste. It is bland and subtly bitter. Alkali (basic) stuff can be neutralized with acid. But for the neutralization you need to mix your alkalic stuff with acid in a liquid ...


7

According to David Lebovitz: Because natural cocoa powder hasn’t had its acidity tempered, it’s generally paired with baking soda (which is alkali) in recipes. Dutch-process cocoa is frequently used in recipes with baking powder, as it doesn’t react to baking soda like natural cocoa does. So, if you're using non-Dutched (natural) cocoa, you can use ...


7

I rarely peel my potatoes, I love the flavor and nutritional benefits (and ease) of retaining the peelings. If skin is too old or green, then I'll peel. This discusses the concern of green potatoes: Are Green Potatoes OK? PS: I always wash my potatoes with a vegetable brush under water; I always wash all produce.


7

There is no universal substitute for wheat flour. The challenges are, roughly, that recipes will often completely fail if you replace wheat flour with something else. The particular questions you've asked aren't really answerable in a concise way. Yes, taste, texture and aroma can all suffer; yes, baking temperatures can change; yes, making (bread) dough is ...


7

This is a very common problem with challah (and any braided bread). As mentioned in comments, it seems likely that the splitting happened in the oven because the bread continued to expand too much after the crust had set. But the braids also complicate the reasons why this may have happened. Here are a few common things to try: Be sure not to braid too ...


6

The purpose of the beer (and the vinegar) in this case is to add some of the malty, fermenty flavors typical of longer-fermented or sourdough breads. You can either leave it out and replace it with an equal quantity of water or use a non-alcoholic beer The carbonation from the beer might add a little extra lift at the start to establish some air cells and ...


6

Cakes are not normally baked a temperature high enough to ignite paper, although the newspaper will probably singe and brown, and possibly produce an unpleasant odor--some of which may be transferred to the cake. If you are going to go this route, I would recommend using baking parchment, which is intended for the heat of the oven, not newspaper. There are ...


6

I presume you're talking about active dried yeast. In that case, the granules of packaged yeast have some nutritive content to them, so what you observe when you add warm water is a weak form of priming. Priming is the addition of both warm water and a food source, typically sugar or flour, to dried yeast with the goal of 'waking-up' the yeast from their ...



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