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17

This step is not about food safety, it's about consistency and in fact about three properties of your jam: Jam comes in a wide variation of consistencies, one parameter is "stiffness", another "water content" and a third "smoothness". In baking, you want smooth (no lumps) jam that is speadable enough to form a thin layer (especially if used as a "glue"), ...


0

I can't cook a whole lot but I make some mean pancakes and NEVER have this issue. My griddle is on 200-250F depending on the type of pancakes I am making (blueberry and chocolate chip are options) and how fast I want the pancakes made. You should have your pan or griddle on and going and hot before pouring your first set. If anything your first set should ...


0

I've been baking bread for sixty years and have used both AP and bread flour. I have yet to notice any appreciable difference...at least any difference worth worrying about. It's just not worth the trouble to store both types at home when AP does such a good job for both bread and pastries. My biggest problem is finishing the bread before it goes stale, ...


4

Short answer: The pan is too hot. That explains why the outside is overcooked or burnt and the batter on the inside is undercooked. Lower your heat. Your batter comes into the equation too. If you have thick batter the inside will take longer to cook. So you need less heat so the outside doesn't burn but the inside batter gets completely cooked. Because ...


5

Ah, the worsening pancake debacle. I know it well. We have all been there, even after training for countless hours to make the perfect soufflé at the Culinary Institute. The pan is getting too hot. You should cool the pan with a quick rinse. This will also have the effect of resetting the surface, to get rid of any built-up grime or grease. Good luck and ...


0

I agree with ElendilTheTall that we should not use a fixed time to identify a well-kneaded dough. A lot of factors such as brand and type of ingredients used apart from weather climate and temperature plays a part in the development of gluten. If you want to see how a well-kneaded bread dough should feel and look like, you can check out my link, where I have ...


2

I've done quite a few experiments (statistically designed using DoE software, in case you're interested) on optimizing rise in yorkshire puddings now and I can tell you it's not necessary to preheat anything. I know this because it was not possible to guarantee uniformity across my trial puddings this way without the whole thing taking ages. So I just put ...


0

It depends on how you like your burgers. If you want any sort of browning or crispyness on the outside (which I would recommend), you will need to cook them at at least about 300 °F (150 °C) for the Maillard Reactions to occur. But that poses a problem if you also want the burger to be cooked rarer than well-done (which I also recommend, especially if you ...


1

Putting the oven at a lower to warm setting like 200 to 250 Fahrenheit (93 to 121 Celsius) is a good approximation for long, slow indirect cooking on a grill.


2

The short answer is yes (although it would be less than 4 whole eggs as answered by @JasonTrue ) The change would be to the texture and flavour of the finished cake, and possibly the rise. Using yolks only will give a much denser, creamer, richer tasting cake. If you replace with whole eggs, you just get a regular cake. Personally, i'd keep the recipe as ...


3

In principal, you'd probably be able to find a recipe that uses ~2 eggs with a similar net volume, but it may not be so easy to retrofit your existing recipe, as it's reasonable to expect that the recipe is relying on some property of the yolk (emulsifying power, fat content, etc). You may find the result satisfying, but it is likely that you will produce a ...


2

As other answers have said, the result will NOT be (3). The chocolate may melt somewhat during baking, but it will solidify again as it cools. How much it sinks will depend on the thickness of the cake batter -- in some cases it may end up on the bottom, and in other cases it may not sink very much. To achieve your desired result (a "semi-liquid state"), ...


1

Sorry, but it certainly won't be Nr 3. It may be edible, but I don't see why you'll do that instead of making a delicious chocolate cake instead. I have dabbled in high-chocolate recipes, and one of them was for chocolate muffins filled with chopped chocolate (not chocolate chips, but a chopped bar) and glazed with chocolate. The pieces of chocolate were ...


-1

BIG brownie crust discovery posted on our blog! You can actually achieve a Shiny brownie crust on ANY recipe. I do not like whipping the eggs and sugar because very often there is a crust, but it is dull! Also, the brownies aren't chewy enough if you whip the eggs and sugar. King Arthur Flour kind of figured it out, but with so many experiments and science ...


-2

Fairly simple: Assuming using a standard round cake pan Take a large pot that can fit a cake pan; and put on stove with lid; heat for about 5 mins on low/med. Insert a wire rack or some other flameproof device that will hold your cake or baking pan up at least 1 inch from bottom. Insert cake pan and cover; cook about 40 mins; until knife comes out clean ...


1

Try "frosting" the cookies with plain (unsweetened) peanut butter -- it will offset the sweetness and be delicious!


0

Egg smell is more evident in pound cakes where the ratio of eggs used is higher. In layered cakes it is less as fats and eggs are in nearly equal proportion. Besides a combination of two essences where vanilla is common and any other like mixed fruit, almond or other as per requirement can be used. Sugar quantity is increased and milk powder is added, thus ...


3

Fresh zucchini has a fairly neutral or sometimes "greenish" smell. An acidic or vinager-like smell is an indication of some kind of fermentation that has set in. We can't say what exactly has started to grow (there is lacto-fermentation, which is typically induced on purpose, but also a good chance that your zucchini simply started to decay), but even if ...


4

The baking time doesn't really depend on the weight. It depends on the thickness, and how well done you want it. The FDA recommends cooking to 145F, but you'll probably find it a lot nicer in the 120-130F range. There's a lot of room for personal preference, so it's hard to be too precise. It doesn't need to be held at the temperature for any length of ...


0

450 seems a little high. I would roast a 2 kg piece of salmon at 400 F for 50 min to 1 hour. Once the flesh flakes easily its done.


1

Frost it. Most surfaces will be rough when looked at closely enough. Bubbles are introduced when you mix the ingredients together (perhaps more if you use a high-speed machine beater & less if you do it by hand) and as a natural part of baking, from baking soda etc. That's what makes the cakes more light and airy as opposed to thick.


1

Does the recipe call for sugar and pre-baking for the crust, besides the butter? I make cheesecake and the recipes all have a sugar, butter and graham cracker for the crust. The crust is required to be pre-baked, and cooled before filling. I have been lucky with my crusts, unless too thick on the side of a spring pan, they all come out clean.


0

You say "toasted" in your title but there are various ways to achieve this, different ines dominating in different countries. If you have a slot toaster (common in the UK, much less so in the rest of Europe, and apparently common in the US/Canada) there are toastabags (although this link is lakeland, they're on e.g. amazon as well). These are reusable bags ...


4

The bread gets crispy and "stiff" because it dries up completely. A good toaster should toast a slice of bread quickly so that the exterior is toasted and the interior barely hot; a bad toaster will not be warm enough and will dry up the slice of bread. Same thing when you do an oven baked sandwich, it should be done on high heat so that the bread toasts ...


2

Yes, me too, I bought mini muffin shaped brownies in a bag and loved the idea so much I wanted to try it myself, so I bought a mini muffin tin especially for that purpose. I read all the answers above to get some guidance. Then I decided to use my favorite brownie recipe from 'Handle the Heat' http://www.handletheheat.com/ultimate-brownies/, with no ...


4

Wrap the sandwich in foil before baking so the moisture stays in the bread. That will prevent it crisping up.


2

You are spot-on: Whole-grain recipes often use more water and tend to "flow", so using a loaf pan is typically the way to go. Loaf pans alow for a "wetter" dough. It is absolutely possible to bake a free-form whole-wheat loaf, but it needs experience with kneading, resting time and shaping to balance the water content and comparatively low gluten. Also, ...


1

Two suggestions: Try making your crumbs larger. Mix the other ingredients together before adding the crumbs - you want to coat 'em, not soak 'em.


0

I find that baking spray with added flour in with the oil works a little better for me than spraying and adding flour. I think because the oil tends to collect in some places and then you get a lot of flour in that one ridge and not evenly coating the pan. If you use butter or solid shortening that tends to be easier to evenly coat, but the flour is still ...


0

Chiffon cake, like it's cousin angel food cake, is mostly air. A big pile of protein bubbles stiffened with a little starch. One very important step is not reflected in your recipe: When the cake is completely baked the proteins have set and the starches have gelatinized but the starches are still very soft. The cake won't have its firm structure until ...


2

You can make pretty much any bread-like substance into french toast (slice the bread, dip or soak in eggs mixed with a little milk, then shallow-fry in your choice of fat) or bread pudding (cube the bread, if necessary spread it out to dry and/or toast it, pile it in a baking pan, cover in a milk + egg + sweetening mixture, bake). Heck, if you're feeling ...


1

Would make awesome bread pudding.


1

In winter when the sun is not too hot, I put the bowl of dough into a glass fish tank which is in the sun. The temperature sits on about 35C (measured with old vacola thermomter).


2

Dust them in flour or powdered sugar. This trick is most commonly used with blueberry muffins.


0

I know it's been a while since this was posted but I thought I would add an answer relevant to 2015: These days you can custom print your own cookie cutters using a 3D printer. While initially the cost is steep (like $1000 or so for a decent one) - You can make so many cool things with these things for pennies once you're up and running. But of course, we ...



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