Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Overall, you should be fine. The purpose of the dutch oven is trapping moisture and, to some extent, coralling the dough. Keep the following in mind: Make sure your bowl can handle the heat - high heat might cause it to warp. To some extent, this is fine, but if the gaps at the bottom get too big, you won't trap the steam the way you want. But some loss ...


0

I have baked a lot of cakes for birthdays, weddings etc. Early on this happened to me a lot. I always multiply up the recipe to be one inch bigger than the size tin I'm using. I then cut the domes off the cake. Do this for each cake. The reason why I make slightly more mixture than I would otherwise need is to get a completely flat cake you cut off quite ...


1

It would help if you could supply a complete list of ingredients (including the type of flour you used) and the temperature you are using to bake your cookies and even what shelf in the oven you are baking on. Were the cookies wrinkled when they came out of the oven or did they wrinkle as they cooled? A lot of different factors determine how CCC's behave ...


0

Paper liners hardly work for me, though parchment papers do a pretty decent job. But if you’re planning to gift them, it’s better you rely on innovative product packaging. They offer a wide variety of products to choose from.


14

Short answer for a short question: Probably. Assuming you're using it to line the pan, paper might leave the cookies less browned than you'd like, but it will provide a physical barrier between cookies and pan just fine. If you're using it to cover the bar cookies to keep them warm, foil works a lot better than paper. If you're cooking the cookies in a ...


1

definitely let them cool, remove them from the baking dish (hopefully you used parchment paper and this step is problem free), then flip them, then cut them as usual. the shiny shell-like top doesn't fracture and get mutilated as much when cut this way.


1

I'd try "deepening" the chocolate flavour, thus reducing the percieved total sweetness: Make a simple ganache with 2 parts very dark chocolate and 1 part cream and use it to sandwich two cookies together. If you really want to go from mistake to fabulous, you could add some additional flavoring to the ganache, either something alcohol-based (Cointreau, rum, ...


0

Chick Peas (aka Garbanzo or Gram) are slightly different to other dried pulses, but the cooking is affected by whether they are to be cooked straight or whether they were soaked (from an hour or two to overnight) first. In the UK a variety of dried peas known as marrowfat peas are sold with a tablet containing bicarbonate of soda (baking soda) to add to ...


3

Lorraine evidently used the Italian meringue method of making macarons. Italian meringue uses hot sugar syrup, not glucose syrup. As you can see from this question, sugar syrup can be kept for a few days in the refrigerator. Simple syrup is available ready made for use in cocktails, but do see William Shakespeare's notes in the commments.


5

You might be able to overcome the sweetness by adding a tart glaze to the cookies (lemon or lime), but I don't know how well that'll go with the chocolate chips. Another option would be to crush them up to make a yogurt parfait (made with plain, unsweetned yogurt). You might also consider some of the options mentioned in What can I use hard, crunchy, ...


-3

There is nothing that you can do with your current batch of cookies (or eat with milk). You just have to follow the recipe correctly and not add sugar as expected!!! If after properly following the recipe, switch to another low(er) sugar recipe. Use any internet search for "low sugar cookies" (or something similar).


2

There is no way to rescue your frosting. It is not just a mixture of ingredients, it used to have a very complicated internal structure, which is now gone. You will have to start a new batch. I assume that the taste of the frosting hasn't changed much. It cannot be used for its original purpose, but you should be able to repurpose it in many ways, for ...


3

Yes, you can use pie crust to make cookies. You will have to roll it out and cut out cookies from it. The result is called "shortbread cookies". Its taste and texture is quite different from a "standard" American cookie. If you use unsweetened pie crust, you will probably want to add something sweet on top of your shortbread cookies. The simplest thing is ...


5

Recipes for fruitcake vary tremendously, without more information there isn't any way to say how long and at what temperature. I looked at several recipes, and none called for a bain marie, but some do recommend a pan of water below the cake to provide moist heat. You might find this Food Network Recipe helpful, because it gives directions for various cake ...


2

When I make coffee to substitute for instant I grind it real fine and make it in a small french press using triple the amount of coffee I would normally use for drinking. I strain it and I reduce the amount of liquids in my recipes. There are things it won't work for such as in chocolates as water will ruin chocolate. I haven't tried brewing it with heated ...


0

Just to add in the Australian terms. Top - white sugar, raw sugar. Bottom - light brown sugar, dark brown sugar


2

The reason for turning the food when baking is so the side that is in contact with the pan can get hit by the hot air. In the case of turning on the bake and then turning on the broil, you would still have the medium of what ever your food is sitting in. If you are willing to elevated your food above a drip pan, turn on just the bottom heating coil (if ...


1

The best advice here is the recommendation of an oven thermometer. I suddenly had issues with a fairly new stove that had baked superbly. Many disasters until I did two things: store my flour, sugar and other dry baking goods in the refrigerator (my area is exceptionally humid these days) and purchase a thermometer. Turns out my oven was 25 degrees hotter ...


0

I have been baking this recepie for years! There is a post on there that tells you to increase the baking soda to 2 tsp. (I cut the recipe down to 36 cookies too) and 2 Tablespoons (yes tablespoons) vanilla. I bake at 330 for 12 min. They turn out amazing!!


1

Not actually a food item, but I once set some parchment paper on fire in the oven while baking cookies. I cut the sheet too big and the extra paper (with no cookies) had some good flames and smoke going on...


1

Wikipedia differentiates between "rolled fondant" and "sculpting fondant": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fondant_icing


0

Perhaps you can experiment a bit with a two pot approach, cooking the beans in an alkaline solution for only a little while and then straining them and transferring them to a non-alkaline solution (a normal pot of boiling water). Your results may be of value to the community in more of an applied science sort of way compared to the more vaunted book learnin' ...


1

Baking soda in your court bouillon only destroys the cell wall of your vegetables.


10

In his book On Food and Cooking, Harold McGee writes regarding beans and legumes: Plain salt at a concentration around 1% (10 g/L, or 2 teaspoons/qt) speeds cooking greatly, apparently because the sodium displaces magnesium from the cell-wall pectins and so makes them more easily dissolved. Baking soda at 0.5% (1 teaspoon/qt) can reduce the ...


1

15/16 months and now you're questioning the oven. A new oven with new features is ALWAYS a good thing, but you will still need to adapt to it, and it's not going to be perfect. I've baked in a variety of commercial ovens and home ovens and each has its issues. It's easy to say "of course" steam, or "of course" convection, or gas or electric or whatever. ...


4

In terms of typical baked goods, radiant heat is radiant heat. Different ovens are not going to provide you with different heat. However...a couple of things to consider: Most consumer ovens are fairly inaccurate in terms of actual temperature vs. temp. on the dial. Get an oven thermometer and keep it in your oven so that you know how "off" yours is, ...


6

For reliable baking you need to know what your oven is doing. If the internal temperature fluctuates wildly, you're dead in the water: replace it. If it's fairly stable, spend some time learning it. Get a decent oven thermometer; set the oven's temperature control to, say, 350 degrees (F) and let it settle; check what the oven thermometer says. Then work ...


0

As long as the source is reputable, the baking instructions will always provide enough information to prevent your ever having to worry over this question. So the answer is definitely no. (It's not the only reason the answer is no, but it goes to the implied fact that you're following a set of instructions.) And since it may help to look at just how those ...


3

Quick answer: No adjustments mandatory. To explain: You will need to adjust baking times when you change the "lump" of batter to be baked. Examples: Mini or Jumbo muffins instead of regular ones. Coffe cake in a loaf or round pan, bread or rolls. Rule of thumb: thicker cake, more time. That's why you use a wooden skewer to test for doneness. As far as the ...


1

"Rollfondant" is "Rolled Fondant" or simply "Fondant" I can't say for certain, but I suspect that "Modellierfondant" is also called "Fondant", but a different consistency (and we don't differentiate in English) ... or it's what they call "gumpaste", which is typically used for making flowers and other more delicate items. There's also "modeling chocolate" ...


0

The generic term for sugar-water pastes used to decorate food is icing or frosting. Rollfondant sounds like ready-to-roll icing, but it could be royal icing, which contains egg white. Modellierfondant sounds like modelling paste. There are various recipes which use different additives to the core ingredients of sugar and water in order to obtain a suitable ...


1

I thought I would try adding baking powder to see if my usually really good Yorkshire puddings would rise any more but no batter went like light cake mixture was a waste of time will stick with my old recipe. If having trouble add another egg I always use 2 and not the recommended one and they are brilliant. Don't know why I messed around


0

I still haven't made any cracker but I was in a similar situation with my sourdough, the cooking phase wasn't right and the result was rock hard on the surface . Again, since I haven't tried your recipe or made similar baked goods, this can even possibly be something counterproductive, but try to cook things in the oven with a container ( made of metal or ...


0

Perhaps lower heat and cook longer...or even use a dehydrator? If you have no dehydrator, try your lowest oven setting until dry and set...might take a few hours. You could also try increasing banana (to help it stick together) and reducing or eliminating the butter, which might inhibit drying.


1

I know you are worried about the flavor being bland, but have you tried mixing the aged, dry cheese with one that will melt better? The flavor of a good, mature cheese goes a long way, so I don't think you will notice a loss of flavor... Find a flavorful, relatively young, melty cheese, experiment with the proportions, and give it another try.


1

No, you do not need to peel red potatoes before baking. As others have already said, good basic food hygiene washing and scrubbing plus removal of any eyes or sprouts suffices. I wonder if the emphasis is on red potatoes as opposed to white or black or other colours? I suppose your relative could have been concerned you would not recognise any green ...


-1

The Cooks Illustrated recipe is entirely wrong and you don't need butter layers (or any butter, for that matter, except to grease the pan). Use corn oil (3 tablespoons to every cup of AP flour); no cornmeal (there has never been cornmeal in Chicago deep dish pizza); and a very short mixing (1 minute) and kneading time (2 minutes)--no need to laminate the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included