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I am making focaccia bread and want to know if olive oil would be ok instead of shortening.


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I am not familiar with your specific recipe, but I usually use yeast in bread or pizza dough. You can use dried and fresh yeast, either works for me. You need to let it rise for an hour or so when you prepared the dough. You could put it all mixed together in a bowl and put that in warm water. That will speed up the rising process.


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This is difficult without knowing what sort of oven you have but here are some basic notes that will help you get started. Many modern ovens will alert you to when they are at temperature. Every oven is different. My oven takes about 5 minutes to preheat but my dad's takes about 10. If your oven doesn't have an alert, - and, honestly, even if it does - ...


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Well, by far the "lowest and slowest" technique out there is sous vide. (Basically, cooking in a precisely controlled temperature water bath.) The typical way to do this involves three steps: Marinate, rub, and/or smoke your meat (optional). Smoking is often preferred since the meat won't go on a grill for a long time, and it helps get that rich flavor ...


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You say: Also I have an electric mixer in which I usually whisk eggs for a cake. Why not use it? There's nothing special about an electric egg beater, really. You'll find it much less strenuous than hand-whisking, even if it's a hand mixer rather than a stand mixer.


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Yes, you can whip egg whites (or whipped cream, or....) by hand. There are a few things you need: a reasonably large bowl a good, sturdy whisk, again not too small proper technique a good amount of ellbow grease patience It will typically take longer than when using a mixer (for beginners, I've seen pros that could keep up with any measly old mixer, ...


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Without a thermometer (which I personally do not own), the other way of testing pork to make sure it is sufficiently cooked is to pierce it with a fork or skewer in the thickest part. Check this extract from recipetips.com: Piercing: Another method for testing doneness is to prick the cut of pork with a fork or the tip of a knife and check to see if the ...


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If you beat egg whites separately and egg yellow and sugar separately and followed by flour, I Am sure you will not get an egg smell in your cake. After beating both you have to combine both and fold. I find this is the best way.


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First, the short answer: There's a lot of erroneous information circulating concerning glass bakeware, and very few reliable sources or repeatable experiments seem to be cited. In general, I'd say that the variance among different metal pans of different materials, colors, thicknesses, and coatings will have more significant effects than the difference ...


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With your plans, you have encoutered some questions and problems. Let's tackle one after another: Alcohol boiling off Although often repeated and assumed due to the lower boiling point of alcohol vs. water, alcohol will not boil off completely. Even after a long boil not only traces, but a significant amount of alcohol remains. There is a question and a ...


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Alcohol begins to boil/burn off at 173F or 78.3C. Chocolate melts at 104F - 113F (40-45C). Marshmallows caramelize at at higher temperature than both the above. So, you could get the booze laced chocolate melted (if your oven goes that low...many do not), but you will burn off the alcohol when you caramelize the mallow. Why not infuse the cake with the ...


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yes I agree the water and butter must be boiling then add the flour and stir briskly with a wooden spoon then wait for the paste to come away from the side of pot before taking off the heat add eggs 1 by 1 whisking briskly with a wooden spoon for each egg I leave the paste in the pot and use a spoon to put the mixture onto a greased oven tray choux cooks ...


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You haven't really explained what you did, so it's a bit hard to give useful advice on how to overcome a failure, but my patê à choux pastries have always come out sized proportional to the amount of pastry I use. Since choux doesn't tend to spread much, make sure your base is close to the diameter you're after; I just pipe inside out, creating a connected ...


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I have recently come across a way to keep the shape of hollow pastries during baking: Wrap your dough around a handful of marshmallows. The marshmallows will hold the dough structure while the dough expands and hardens. The marshmallows will eventually melt in to a pool of sugar at the bottom of the pastry that you can remove or leave in as a surprise.


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It happens the Maillard reaction, which is a chemical reaction that is responsible for turning baked and roasted food golden brown.


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http://www.theslackergourmet.com/2012/11/baking-turning-quick-bread-mix-into.html Well here's a link on how to do so for All the non believers . Hope you enjoy !


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American bread is more bitter than Japanese bread. I think this is caused by the use of baking power or baking soda.


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Wire whisks also can be used in lieu of pastry blenders if mechanically stable enough (stomp, don't stir). Also, the standard whisks from a hand mixer tend to do crumbles quite well (in this case stir don't stomp - and do not overfill the mixing bowl, hand mixer whisks are good at propelling things very far if they can :). Recipe might have to be tuned in ...


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Yeast Dies at 140 Degrees f . Any internal temp past that and you are getting 0 oven spring. The dough you speak of is being punched down and spread out in a pan so the internal temp is going to heat past 140 way faster than a loaf of bread. And yes the solid crust that is formed right away due to lack of oven steam is going to counteract any oven spring. ...


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I know this is an older post but just want to throw my 2 cents in. I was lucky enough to come across 2 new stoneware bread pans (NEW) at a resale shop. I bought them for 10 dollars and they are from the "Sassafras" company. Good pans. I have been seasoning the inside of them with a canola oil spray. They have a real nice patina on them now. I also sprinkle ...


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I came here because I don't actually like the white cake. The texture is a bit different. After reading these great suggestions I found instructions on the box in small print. Betty Crocker mix says: add the whole egg and don't change anything else. I think I will do that. Thanks for all the suggestions..


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You certainly can and my Uncle does it all the time. He stays in the mountains riding horses all summer and when I come up, we'll do ribs at least once, because I like them so well. The way he prepares them is to buy them in bulk at the Sam's Club. He'll split the racks in half and freeze them individually. He'll defrost a half-rack per person to make ...


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Personally I cook my ribs in a pot covered with a homemade sauce to my liking then I fill the pot with the sauce and slow cook with tin foil over the top at 160 for 8 hours it melts off the bone lovely


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I'd recommend freezing them unbaked. The crumb is a lot more delicate once they're baked and more susceptible to moisture migration, leading to them being soggy or stale (or both! at the same time!) when thawed. Scones, being relatively low moisture and not containing yeast, actually freeze quite well and can usually go straight from the freezer to the oven. ...


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I think you're most definitely better off baking them and then freezing them. Breads and pastries freeze beautifully. I worked at a Starbucks and we received all of our pastries frozen because of our location being outside of the main distribution area. It didn't make a difference from the ones we received unfrozen at another store. Just don't defrost ...


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Like this one http://www.amazon.com/Wilton-Aluminum-4-Inch-Long-Loaf/dp/B00024WNOU/ref=sr_1_4?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1430189232&sr=1-4&keywords=Pullman+loaf+pan or are there some other requirements?


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There are a few things that can affect the rise of the layers. If you're baking multiple layers at once, even if your oven heats evenly, the cake on top will rise less than the one of the bottom. The problem is that the top will crust, preventing the top layer from rising as high as the one underneath which is shielded from the radiant heat. If you're ...


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Rendered bacon fat after it hardens. It's a tasty substitute.


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Do you have two pie pans? I'd recommend doing a test of at least the crust alone before you actually need to make the dessert (if you're making it for an occasion, that is). The cans of cinnamon rolls aren't that expensive and they're perpetually putting out coupons for them... and they will still taste good as long as they don't burn. I recommend ...



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