New answers tagged

1

The second rising is quite necessary for good, light, airy bread. When you fold the bread and then shape it into a proper loaf, you compress it, pushing out some of the air pockets that grew when it was rising. If you don't let it rise a second time after shaping, the bread won't have the proper airy-ness and it will be very dense. You can't shape the ...


1

There's not really any difference between the two apart from the colour. Sometimes ghee contains a few extra flavourings to make the taste more distinctive. However, I don't think there's much of a difference.


12

Since raisins are a type of dried fruit, they don't have a lot of moisture left in them. Heat from baking with just make them drier, eventually resulting in that chewy, not particularly pleasant lump. The internal raisins are more protected from the heat, so they stay the same consistency. One solution may be to soak the raisins in water, fruit juice, or ...


2

Typically, yes. (it depends on the exact recipe). There's actually a whole category of crafts / gifts for various 'mixes in a jar' where you mix up all of the dry goods, put it in a jar, decorate it, and label it w/ instructions on what else needs to be done. update: To clarify -- if the recipe calls for mixing all of the dry ingredients together before ...


0

You might be able to, give the capacity you state in your comment, but it might not mix or rise properly. You'll have to test, keeping within the capacity limits to protect the machine. You might end up with bad dough, but it may be receoverable with some extra kneading and proving (though it won't recover to as good as you'd have got in the first ...


1

Most recipes for seitan cook it too hot in the beginning (over-leavening it before it can set, getting it too light/"brains-ish") and too short (leaving the gluten rubbery). Try 140°C, 3 hours, wrapped in THICK tinfoil (several layers. Tightly or loosely makes a textural difference, because you are controlling how much it can expand). Also, brands of gluten ...


7

In order to understand what's going wrong you need to understand what's happening in the oven. Bread rises in the oven because the yeast gets a boost from the heat before it is killed by it, and by the expansion of gases (O2, CO2, and water vapor) trapped in the dough. Well-developed gluten will trap air well, under-developed gluten will allow it to ...


7

The easiest solution is to use different cheeses. Most commercial pizzerias, like Domino's or Pizza Hut do not use expensive cheeses like Parmesean or fresh mozzerella... they use crappy cheese designed to be stretchy and to stay that way when warm instead of hot. In general, they use part-skim mozzarella, which is often sold pre-shredded and in hard blocks ...


1

I have had the same crumbly problem when I haven't blind baked it long enough ( look for the slightly darker color and note strong aroma of deliciousness before removing from the oven ). Also check the knife you are using. A serrated bread knife can be very helpful in a cleaner cut through a graham cracker crust. Hope this helps.


1

I recommend putting your pizzas in a place where they stay warm. An isolated box, or in your bed in a carton box. The dough will get soggy eventually, though. Domino's gets away with this because the dough is thicker so it takes a while. If you want crispy, nice, fresh pizza, I recommend eating them fresh, especially because you are making them fresh ...


4

For this recipe, the most likely issues are: overbaking and wrong oven temperature Simply put, removing too much humidity during the baking process. Wrong oven temperature can aggravate this problem, especially if it is too low (to hot = burned edges and wet center). over-mixing This recipe is very sensitive to overmixing, which means forming gluten ...


0

Some people claim that temperature regulation is worse in a toaster oven. That simply isn't true. It's actually easier to control temperature precisely in the toaster oven because the space is so small so the temperature sensor can get a sense of the entire oven. In a large oven, especially a home gas oven, where would you place the sensor? If you place it ...


1

I can't say I've done exactly what you're trying to do, but I've had quite a few attempts at setting gummi laces into jello, and I really don't think it's going to work to bake them in. You have a few major problems: Gummi laces do strange things when they get wet. They swell up to about 2-3x their size (in every dimension ... so 8-27x volume), diluting ...


0

The reason is simple. If it uses plastic or paper packaging for cooking, the radiant heat of an electric oven is too hot and will melt the plastic and possibly ignite the paper. In a normal oven, the majority of the heat is not radiant but convective, and the heat source is relatively far away. If you don't use plastic packaging, food cooks just as well in ...


1

A version without marshmallows would be those that bind rice krispies (or cornflakes) with chocolate. See for example bbcgoodfoods (using cornflakes) or a site for kids. The base procedure is to melt chocolate, optionally thin it a bit with butter and/or syrup and fold in your cereals. If you want light rice krispie treats, use white chocolate instead of ...


1

There are plenty of recipes for rice krispie cakes without marshmallows in them. Rather than trying to substitute in your recipe, you'd be better off making something slightly different but that's been tested. Here's an example from tesco. The recipe we use is based on golden syrup, but isn't online. A search for "rice Krispie cake -marshmallow", possibly ...


1

Sugar water will just make your Krispies soggy. Anything but gelatin and marshmallows will make them taste funny, but sufficient peanut (or other nut) butter, to make the stuff stick together, plus an egg might give you something tasty and edible after baking.


2

I usually add about 2 tablespoons of mashed potatoes to my bread recipes (3 cups of flour). I haven't tried it with potato flakes or potato flour. If you put too much the dough will be very sticky and the bread dense


1

I bake lots of cheesecakes and have never used the water bath. I always place a shallow dish of hot water under my cake. The trick to baking a cheesecake is to use a low temperature and longer baking time. Cool very slowly to avoid cracking.


0

The key is nothing to do with freezing your butter. I have been trying various ones for years and now have then perfect. The 2 main things to remember. 1st The milk which should be soured but don't buy it just warm your milk in the microwave to take chill from it then squire lemon juice in it and thus will sour it. After you have done your butter and ...


2

The lack of vent holes would have been a problem. Vent holes allow steam to escape, reducing the amount of internal moisture. This moisture will both prevent the crust from cooking fully through, and will cause the crust to soften as after it comes out of the oven. That's not to say that there wasn't also some other problem, just this is one thing that ...


0

I don't think there is something readymade which you can substitute. Other dishes, plates, etc. as suggested in other answers are somewhat usable, but tend to 1) not fit well, and 2) not have handles. The result is that, when you are taking the hot pan out of the oven, you risk a hot porcelain plate sliding and landing on the floor breaking, or on your lap ...


0

I usually using a big plate for this (but make sure it can handle the heat or slowly heat it up) or as previously suggested use a bigger lid. Sometimes a flat baking form like for a quiche does work as a lid as well (a friend of mine even used a frying pan once). Just be creative and look for something that is heat resistant and large enough to cover the ...


1

One "hack" to try is to put a larger glass baking dish on top (e.g. 9"x13" over an 8"x8"). It is heavy enough to make a moderately decent seal.


0

Personal experience: longer fermentation times allows me to eat sourdough without problems. Too short: 7–12 hours, and I feel the effects pretty quickly. About right: ~24 hour range, and I can eat and feel good. Just beginning to test the limit of what I can eat in a sitting before I feel the effects, or even if there is a (reasonable) limit. Monash ...


3

There is a similar tradition in Bulgaria. On the Christmas Eve is served Christmas bread with a coin inside it. Then everyone takes a piece of the bread. The one who finds the coin inside his piece will be very lucky and happy during the next year. The Christmas bread can be in different shape with variety of ornaments and symbols. According to the old ...


2

Balancing the sweetness with something that adds textural or flavor depth can mitigate the cloying, one-note sweet sensation. Try adding ground nuts - not too much, otherwise you will mess with the recipe chemistry. Try sour (or perceived sour) flavorings like citrus zest or mahlep. Amchur or Anardana could work too, given they are solid sour flavorings, ...


1

Do you use any fats in your mix? On this page there is the suggestion that adding some fat -- say, 50g of butter or oil -- can extend shelf life. Fats (butter, oils, milk, eggs). Fats enrich and flavor the bread. They also soften the dough and preserve it: whereas a fat-free loaf of bread like a French bread goes stale after only a few hours, a loaf of ...


0

Here in the UK, I can use 1/3rd of a 1.5kg bag of strong white bread flour (95p/3=32p) and 1 sachet of dried yeast at 11p to make a loaf for 43p, and that gives me a loaf equivalent to this 800g supermarket sandwich loaf at £1.00. Tastes better, too. So that's better than double, in my experience.


0

I'd do a rest/first prove of nearer an hour or so - just double the size before knocking back / shaping. Then another hour or so for it to rise, before baking. If you can't give it the time because of work, you can try chilling the dough; a six-hour prove in the fridge will slow the yeast and might help you avoid over-proving. Since you asked about flour -- ...


1

To go another route -- a bit of forward planning and the use of a fridge might be another way to solve your problem, which is probably one of boredom or inconvenient timing. Instead of making bread over the course of a morning -- say, between 9am and midday -- you can make it over 24 hours in the fridge, using the cold environment to slow the yeast and ...


1

Natural food coloring kits, consisting of powdered concentrates, are available at health food stores in some regions, eg http://shop.biovegan.de/biovegan-farbspass-farbende-lebensmittel-5x8g is common here... and in this case, there is no cochineal in there, since insects/arachnids do not widely qualify as vegan, and this brand (as the name says :) ...


6

It's a tradition in Scotland as well. A boiled suet fruit cake Clootie Dumpling is when eaten at Christmas especially has small coins and charms included in the mixture. The mixture is put in a clean muslin cloth and boiled. Although traditionally eaten at Christmas the pudding is also eaten at other times but the coins/charms are only used at Christmas. ...


5

Yes, this is definitely a Greek tradition, a New Year's bread called vasilopita Vasilopita (Greek: Βασιλόπιτα, Vasilópita, lit. '(St.) Basil-pie' or 'king pie', see below) is a New Year's Day bread or cake in Greece and many other areas in eastern Europe and the Balkans which contains a hidden coin or trinket which gives good luck to the receiver, like ...


0

The BBC is a good source for classic british food; here is a classic buttermilk scone recipe here, and here is another made with milk. (I'd say buttermilk is the better way to make them. The correct way to eat one is in a cream tea - a pot of tea, a scone with tea, strawberry or raspberry jam, and clotted cream, served around 3 in the afternoon. Nothing ...


1

Probably there is no such way, at least not one that's worthwhile. First, there is the problem that designing a recipe well is a skill which very few people have. Experienced bakers can progress to it, but inexperienced ones can make 100 trials but won't understand what went wrong with any of them. Unless you're in it for the fun of it, it's easier to find ...


2

Leaving the bread out uncovered overnight is likely one of the larger issues with staling. All bread will start to stale immediately after it's come out of the oven -- commercial bread simply has other ingredients to help slow this effect. (and I know we've had a question on this topic) They also package the bread in plastic to hold moisture near the loaf ...


3

I assume you're trying to extend shelf life for a couple of days, not weeks. One possibility is dough enhancers, many of which improve shelf life. Most can be very easily incorporated into an existing bread machine recipe. There are a variety of possibilities, and you can also buy commercially available dough enhancers that combine various helpful additives ...


4

As long as the eggs aren't expired you should be fine. I've made creme brulee many times with both fresh eggs and not so fresh with similar results.


2

Basic bread requires flour, water, salt and yeast (nothing more). The salt and yeast contribution to the weight is negligible. Water, in my experience, shall be - before cooking - about 70% in weight with respect to flour; the actual quantity depends mainly on the kind of flour, but 70% is a reasonable average estimate. Loss of total weight during cooking is ...


0

A few options: Add a bit (or a bit more) sugar to the dough. Use a sourdough starter instead of yeast. The ideas in Sourdough in Bread Maker? might be helpful. Add lupin flour, as mentioned in "Why add lupin flour to white bread?" Store in a paper bag. If you're not using a breadmaker, leaving the dough overnight to have the yeast really do their job ...


2

flour/water : 100:50 - 100:65 as you like the dough -> 1kg flour : 1,5kg -1,65kg dough. You have 10% loss of weight by backing. Thats all.


16

In my experience, it doesn't really save money, but it's still worth it because it's fresh and better than store-bought at the same price. For me, 1kg of all purpose flour yields 1.6kg of bread (as two loaves). Each 13x4x4" (Pullman) loaf weighs about 800 grams after cooling and yields between 24-30 slices depending on thickness. The cost per loaf is under ...


8

It would depend greatly on the recipe used. However, for example, this recipe from Jamie Oliver for "Basic Bread" yields 1 loaf of bread and utilizes 1kg of flour. Additionally if you are comparing for economic reasons, you'd also need to take into account the cost for yeast, salt and any enrichments (egg, sugar, etc as specified by recipe). The average ...


-1

I have read applesauce could be a great substitute for butter in baking. Its 68 calories per 100g, which is less than a tenth of the calories you would get from margarine and without the trans fat. The ratio from what I have read is 1:1 to butter.


1

In the UK we don't have Earth Balance, and often DF margerine on it's own is too soft, even when chilled: I find a mix of dairy-free margarine and vegetable shortening works - I've not made pastry yet, however for "buttercream" icing I do a 50/50 mixture. Hope this helps!


1

There are good quality vegan margarines (Earth balance, Alsan) on the market nowadays, often they are of the interesterified instead of the hydrogenated variety. They are designed to behave and taste similar to butter instead of (as many cheap margarines seem to do) staying spreadable at temperatures where butter would be very firm. Unlike pure coconut or ...


2

You will want to scale the fish, definitely. If you don't the result will be absolutely awful as the scales will come off in cooking and get all over the place. They won't stay attached to the skin for easy removal. Other than gutting and scaling (and a thorough wash) preparation before cooking depends on the effect you want on the table, and how much you ...


3

Since this is a bread you are accustomed to baking, you know how the dough should feel. You will either have to change the amount of liquid or the amount of some other ingredient(s) - probably the flour. I suggest that you start by adding some of the flour to the oat flour and all of the wet ingredients. Then, continue adding more flour until the dough ...


0

If you are making largish cakes, say 8" diameter or above and are deep like Christmas cakes, and you're doing it in (metal) cake tins, you might consider using flower nails. Flower nails look like big metal drawing pins, The base of the flower goes in the bottom of the cake tin and must be in contact with the tin, so if you are lining the tin with ...



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