New answers tagged

1

A cake teacher taught me this method and it works beautifully. Trace your image onto the rice paper (bumpy side up) with edible ink. Cut the image out with about an 1/4 inch border left on. Place picture on cake. Use a toothpick to outline the image. Remove image and spread piping gel (get at Michaels, Hobby Lobby etc.) inside the traced toothpick lines. ...


1

Many vegetables that are cut and stored (sold) in plastic always get this acidic smell after approx. 2 days. Initially that is not a health issue, when sold in supermarkets you see that the 'sell by' date is not yet reached when this happens. It is perfectly fine to use them, but you may taste the acidity in your end product. When I buy e.g. cut mixed ...


1

Beside the general considerations Athanasius covered, I would say that if a food has a traditional baking vessel, it is best to stick with it if you have one. If you don't have, make it in whatever you have that resembles the original most closely, and see if you like the result. If not, you may need to invest in the proper item. For example, baking bundt ...


4

Before I say anything further, if you are beginning to bake, I'd suggest investing in a basic introductory cookbook, which can provide more detail than I will here. Also, you'll find that recipes will generally the type of pan to use. (And when no material is specified, metal is a pretty good default for most applications. Recipes designed for glass will ...


0

A good combi microwave can do it, but the top might cook a bit quickly. The one we have is a Panasonic, and has microwave, grill and convection functions, as well as combinations of microwave with the other two. The convection mode uses a top element and a fan hence the top of the food maybe browning too fast. Foil should help. The controls, cooking in ...


1

There's nothing wrong with your dough, it looks like you are getting a good rise out of it, which is what you want. I can't see you wanting to mess with success. What you need to do is adjust your rolling and braiding technique to take into account how much rise you are going to get. Try rolling out your braids a bit thinner and braiding them much looser, ...


3

I don't know what a "mini oven" is, so I will skip this one. You should not, under any circumstances, get a microwave. A microwave is not suitable for baking. There are models which are supposed to be a microwave and convection oven at once, but I have frequently heard of them not turning off the microwaves when in convection mode, despite the manual ...


7

Much would depend on exactly what ovens you are either getting for the new location or that come with the new location. The particular commercial natural gas convection ovens I get to play with sometimes have blowers that can be high, low or off - but you risk more unevenness than a home oven if the blowers are off. Mostly you need to experiment. Initially ...


1

Unfortunately, your link does not seem to be working for me right now, but assuming you are making a leavened bread dough, here's some tips. Let me know if you've tried all these before. Wet your hands before handling the dough. This will temporarily keep the dough from sticking to your hands but be warned: this effect will not last forever. Make sure to ...


3

If x is the fraction by weight of bread flour, then: 0.127x + 0.75(1-x) = 0.15 0.75 - 0.623x = 0.15 0.6 = 0.623x x = .963 So, use 96% bread flour and 4% of your high-gluten flour, by weight.


-1

I made modelling chocolate by substituting corn syrup with honey and it was great! 85g honey (I used a bark honey, which isn't as sweet as flower honey) 225g chocolate (I was using white chocolate)


4

After buttering the pan (with a solid fat, not oil), I flour the chimney first, usually by generously sifting the flour on it (tilting the pan and rotating it helps), then I use what falls down for the usual rotating method to flour the bottom and outer rim. Tap out the excess and you're done. Chilling the prepared pan helps the butter/fat layer ...


5

Use cake release. It's simple; just mix one part flour, one part solid fat (shortening), and one part liquid oil (roughly by volume). Assuming that your oils are shelf stable, your cake release will be too. Once it is mixed, you'll never have to grease and flour a cake pan again. Just paint it on with a pastry brush. I recommend this one.


0

Dishwasher for the win!! Make sure it's clean, of course, and water isn't actively dripping from above. I ensure mine's clean, turn it on and let the bottom fill with hot water, turn off before it can drain, insert bread - wait an appropriate amount of time... then bake.


4

Salt will kill yeast if directly exposed; furthermore it will have an effect on the texture as well as significantly altering the taste. Just remember that if you are baking your own bread the amount of sodium is significantly reduced compared to commercial products (Most of the bread recipes I've used have very little salt in them anyway) and you may find ...


3

It is entirely possible. You leave out the salt and that's it, no other changes needed. The preference for salt in bread is learned, at first it can be weird to get accustomed to it, but as time passes, you will find yourself being unpleasantly surprised when you happen to eat salted bread. Salt does have effects beside those on the bread tasting salty, ...


2

No, you cannot. Cow milk has proteins, which curdle when exposed to acid, thickening the whole thing. Coconut milk is simply a suspension of fat in water, with very few carbohydrates and practically no proteins. You cannot curdle it with acid.


3

Yes, they can be used for other dishes. I've never done it myself, so I cannot elaborate. I scanned the Amazon reviews for a panettone paper. I saw people had used them for sweet bread, muffins, some used it for cheesecake. I imagine the papers could be used for souffles and quiches. One Amazon reviewer mentioned you may need to increase the moisture in ...


1

I was always under the impression that it was something mixed into the batter. Something maybe oil-soluble, or some of which rose to the top as the batter sat in the oven and settled just a little bit, and cooked into a separate layer, and some of which stayed mixed into the rest of the batter for additional sugary, chocolatey flavor. Part of the reason I ...


0

I bake my fair share of brownies, and I've noticed that when I stir chocolate chips into the batter, I get the shiny flaky crust. For my brownie recipe, which is baked in a 9x13" pan, I add about 3/4c chocolate chips. King Arthur Flour had an interesting blog post about experimenting with brownies to get this result, and they ended up with the same answer.


4

I did this, and it didn't turn out so well. My oven was just north of 200 degrees celsius, I didn't want to deal with having the hot stone out of the oven, so I just tossed some sausage rolls on the stone to bake. By the time the top puffed and browned sufficiently, the bottom was, well, pretty burned. Now, these sausages were pretty big bangers (wrapped ...


4

You can replace any of the three with applesauce, or all of them - with the caveat that it will change the taste and texture of the final product, with more difference from more substitution. You do not have to substitute all of them if you choose to substitute one of them - the substitutions would be independent of each other (other ingredient amounts stay ...


1

Damper can be made without yeast. It was and still is the food source of travelling stockman and drovers in Australia, and it rises as much as normal bread. Try searching for a damper recipe as an alternative.


0

My response is similar to @Megha's -- buffering with something. I suggest purchasing an AirBake pan. You can try cooking right on the pan, I've always had success there. An alternative is to put the AirBake pan on the bottom rack as a buffer, and cook on the middle rack per your usual routine. Note: I mention the AirBake brand because it's what I know. ...


0

I have the same problem. It seems landlords prefer lowest cost appliances, but as you said you cannot choose. Having the heating element below the oven interior is preferable. In this situation I do two things differently: 1) Use an oven thermometer and check it both before and several times while cooking. In my case, the oven temperature is 50F above the ...


0

One solution is to use a baking stone. There are lots of variations available, from thick ceramic baking trays to pizza stones to bit of tile or stone scavenged from contractors or construction people. The point is, the (well cleaned) stone goes in your oven, and stays there. It takes more time to heat up, and also to cool down - but in exchange for this ...


0

The pan that you use can greatly affect how things cook from the bottom -- Dark metals will absorb radiant heat, while light colored shiny metals will reflect it away. Glass dishes allow it to pass through to the food. What I would try doing is use something light colored (either aluminium or an opaque white casserole dish) in an upper rack, while placing ...


1

I am still very much an amateur in this area, however my current mental model is that the way to develop more flavor is by slowly cultivating many generations of yeast. So, the potential problem with letting your young yeast get all the sugar all at once, is that you greatly reduce both the time and the number of generations. One option is let your yeast ...


0

I just made the same pie--10" with double key lime filling--and I had the same question you posed. I baked mine 15 min at 350, then reduced the temp to 325 and baked it til the internal temperature was 145°F, which is what I read it should be on another site. (I think that took about 10 more minutes of baking.) The crust was browing a bit too much and ...


0

Temperature is not a good indicator doneness with any meat that has a lot of connective tissue. Tough meat is tough because there is lots of connective tissue to transfer the force exerted by the muscle to the bones. Connective tissue breaks down in the presence of heat and moisture over time. When you cook ribs or beef shin or any other tough cut of meat ...


2

The temperature you are reading is heavily flawed. There is no way your probe's reading will not be heavily biased by proximity to bone, and the relative thinness of the meat. Regardless of all that, barbecue is done when it is done. When cooking meats whose connective tissue needs to be broken down, the final temperature will be well beyond food safety ...


2

It's very difficult to give an answer, as the size and shape of the casserole can greatly affect the reheating time. I've found to get the best results, I start the casserole covered in a cold oven (put it in the oven, then turn the heat on), and cook it at low heat (300°F / 150°C) until it's heated through. Once it's up to temperature, I uncover the dish ...


1

Make sourdough. Ferment longer. Background For those unfamiliar with the glycemic index: Foods with a higher value are more likely to cause spikes in blood sugar. On a scale from 0-100, foods like potatoes with a value of 70 or greater have a high glycemic index, while foods like peas and garlic, with a value of 55 or less, have a low glycemic index. There’...


1

My mother is the founder of the Glycemic Index Foundation of South Africa (http://www.gifoundation.com/), so let's see how well I've been listening to her! Stephie is right, legume flours do lower the GI. Beans contain slow release carbohydrates which lowers the GI. Chickpea flour is the best to use here. I find you cannot sub more than 1/4 of the total ...


0

I hate wasting, so I get why you are asking this, lol! I agree with "osp"... SMELL it. Sour or fishy or not like banana, well, then your banana bread might taste like something sour or fishy or not like banana. Easiest solution is to just scoop off the top layer of the mashed banana that was exposed to the air!


1

Usually the best way to incorporate any bits into cookie dough is to first mix the dough completely and then mix in the bits - whether it be chocolate chips, nuts, oreo bits etc. This way the bits are not smashed and stay as undisturbed as possible and retain their shape as a whole. So mix the dry and wet ingredients together to form the dough, then lightly ...


1

Have you considered a thicker batter and/or setting/freezing the corndog prior to baking? I expect the oils and liquids from the hotdog are creating a non-stick coating causing the batter to slide before it has a chance to cook. Maybe you could make a cornmeal based dough that you can wrap around the hotdog. It wouldn't be the original corndog, but will ...


0

Yes chocolate can be frozen if required, it can extend the shelf life by 50% if not more, but not forever. It is suggested to slow the cooling/freezing process. Depending on how you want to use it, depends on whether you need to carefully thaw it out before using. Many professional chocolatiers have information on these topics online.


1

Convenience and longer term storage, plus a closer to freshly baked result compared to a pre baked item that has or is going stale to some degree,


3

I'm not sure about blending the cornmeal, though I would be interested to hear if it works, but if all you want is to try and keep the batter from falling off, you might try changing the hotdogs instead. Hotdogs have a smooth texture, there's not a lot for the batter to grip onto. You might try mechanically roughening the surface, using crisscross ...


0

Guessing there was an accumulation of trapped air, either during the preparation of the batter/sponge cake mix, or when pouring into the pan/tin.


0

You should try the same recipe again, but use a cloth instead of plastic wrap to cover your dough for the fermentation period. The alcohol smell is the ethanol the yeast is producing, and in my own experience the more anaerobic the greater the level of ethanol produced.


0

Have you considered using a maple syrup reduction. This should lower the amount of moisture you have been applying to your nuts.


1

Yes, perfectly fine to freeze it. It will last approximately forever, frozen. Related: How long can you keep chocolate in the freezer?



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