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0

GdD's information and suggestions are all informative and helpful. You might also try adding an 'autolyse' rest as the French do. After mixing the water, yeast, and flour together until well combined, allow the dough to rest for about 20 minutes. This allows the flour to become hydrated and the gluten to start its development. Since the gluten begins to ...


2

I have been baking no-knead bread in a heavy porcelain 2-qt.soufflé dish with a glass lid with great success and consistent crust on all sides. My recipe is based on Jim Lahey's magical recipe at http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/11376-no-knead-bread but I use only 1 1/2 cups water, 1 cup white whole wheat flour, 2 cups of bread flour,1 1/4 tsp. ...


0

Ricotta Impastata is the finest Ricotta you can use for Cannoli filling. It is only made in Sicily. I am sicilian and my sister uses it for her Cannoli's, They are fantastic!! It is quite expensive but worth the price. Hope this helps for the person that said there is no such ricotta.


4

I'll try to break this down into components to make it simpler. If a recipe starts by combining sugar and a solid fat (creaming), this incorporates small air bubbles into the batter which will be seed bubbles for the carbon dioxide produced by chemical leavening. Occasionally, this creaming is used alone for leavening (as in traditional poundcakes). If the ...


1

The biggest difference that I know about is that mixing all the dry ingredients means that all you have to do is mix in the wet ingredients into the already homogenous mixture, this allows you to blend less to develop a nice and solid gluten matrix. If you add eggs after flour, all the other ingredients then have to be worked into what is already a dough ...


2

The problem is that the dough is so moist on most no-knead breads, that the weight of the bread itself will crush down, leading to a difference in texture between the top and bottom of the loaf. I suspect that's the reason that they often tell you to bake them in a pre-heated cast iron pot -- so that the bottom will set before the warmth of the oven causes ...


1

It is possible that the cake will bake to completion if you wait longer. As Ecnerwal said, it doesn't matter what the book says about time. A cake is done when it is done, and you have to test it for that. "Bake for X minutes" is rarely a good thing to do, it just gives you an initial idea of how long it may take. But there is also a high probability that ...


3

Nothing is wrong. Continue baking until the toothpick comes out clean. The toothpick test is more definitive than time and temperature (and temperatures are not always what they claim, but don't drastically alter yours without feedback from a RELIABLE oven thermometer..) As I mentioned in a comment on another post, I once had a bad recipe (from a fancy ...


0

i agree, adding 1/2 tsp in 3 cups flour along with 1 sachet of yeast does makes a different. bread comes out very soft and fluffy. It is easy to handle as well. i love baking breads now


0

There is an organic shortening just so you know... I recommend coconut oil for the same reasons already posted. Then there is butter. Both of them have the same amount of calories. The same with organic olive oil. I do not recommend canola oil if you are wanting to be organic. It is made from the rapeseed and the rapeseed is a genetically modified product. ...


1

There's only onw way that I know to tell the two apart without using it: granule size Instant is (typically?) smaller than (most?) active dry yeast. However, unless you have a magnifying glass, and maybe some source of yeast for a comparison, it's going to be very, very difficult to tell them apart. I don't know how much granule size is a function of ...


2

You can't really tell by looking, at least not without a known sample of the same brand. The good news is that they are usually interchangeable 1:1. Make a recipe you know well. Does it rise as you expect? Or does it take more or less time? That will most likely give you your answer. If the dough behaves as usual, it's a good bet that you have what you ...


0

coffee enhances the chocolate / cocoa for a more chocolatey cake. I don't think you should be able to taste the coffee though, the fact that you can taste the coffee suggests that either there's to much coffee or its to strong, to correct this you can try reducing the amount of coffee or try with instant coffee as I believe it's not as strong, I also don't ...


-1

By aerating almost any application of baking that calls for such method, the end product is almost always going to be more delicate if done properly. Here are a couple of tips I learned in Culinary school on how to beat egg whites: Use clean utensils (of course right). let the egg whites come to room temperature (OR you can let a blow torch "lick" the ...


5

The difference between gluten and gliadin is the one already explained in your question: Gliadin is a precursor to gluten. You could say that gliadin is to gluten what grains are to porridge. Gluten is the result of glutenin reacting with gliadin in the presence of water, just like porridge is the result of grains "reacting" with milk in the presence of ...


3

Don't use the pizza stone for cookies. Stones absorb a ton of your oven's heat and will really mess up your baking times. They're designed to be preheated in your oven before you ever put a pizza (or other item) on them. I have never tried it before but you might be able to use the pizza stone if you preheated it but then you have to put your cookies on a ...


0

Aaronut's answer explains role of sugar well, but here one more explanation about the ontology side of the question. No, it's not new, but when said in different words, it can make more sense. Just stop thinking of "wet" and "dry" ingredients. What we have is a method of making cakes which requires two separate intermediate mixtures to be mixed in one ...


-4

In baking, you need to keep a proper ratio of wet/dry ingredients. When heated, sugar returns to its original liquid form.


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I have an electric oven.I heat my stone on the floor and the bottom is perfect in 5 minutes,I then transfer the pizza to the broiler to finish the top for about 2 minutes. With perfect results.


0

Moving it up should help. Also try a glass pan not a metal pan that will slow the heat transfer into the cake.


3

If the recipe calls for both (and it's a good recipe), it actually needs both. A common reason is that the baking powder provides leavening and the baking soda helps neutralize a bit of the acid. It's a little surprising you're finding that baking soda ruins the taste and not baking powder; baking powder contains baking soda. I wonder if "ruins the taste" ...


1

The answer is: "It depends." Baking soda requires an acidic ingredient to leaven foods, but baking powder has the acid already added. Some recipes will use both if there is an excess or acid in the dough/batter that can be used by baking soda to rise more. If you find that the taste of baking soda ruins your dishes it's probably that you didn't have ...


0

I've just been fiddling with sourdough again after a long hiatus, and a lot of prior experience of not very sour sourdough. Have not read the book in question, so I can't say one way or another on their method. From what I understand, most of the sour is from lactic acid bacteria, and those are found naturally on the hulls of whole grain - so whole wheat ...


1

In addition to the browning, there is a distinctive taste to pretzels that are treated in an alkaline solution prior to baking. If you can't get (or don't want to work with) food grade lye, there is another option. If you place baking soda in a low oven, you can convert sodium bicarbonate into sodium carbonate, thus increasing alkalinity. See this: ...


1

Putting it in the fridge probably didn't help matters any. If you had left it on the counter overnight it would probably have gotten its act in gear without further help. Yeast works slower when cool than when warm, but it does work, given time. IMPE, dry packet yeast going bad is somewhere between rare and unheard of - unless it's stored somewhere that is ...


1

I can think of one case where yeast doughs shouldn't suffer from mechanical mixing: If you're going to be rolling out the dough (eg, for filling & making dumpling-like products, or rolling balls for monkey bread), you'd normally end up compressing the air bubbles when rolling it. Mechanical mixing has the same problem, so the difference between ...


1

As explained in my older answer Joe linked in a comment, the purpose of stretch and fold is to align the gluten sheets, producing the typical structure of kneaded bread. Depending on your final shaping, you end up with either a sheetlike structure (e.g. in ciabatta) or with spirals/threads in kozunak and other braided breads. One reason to not do the ...


1

Experiment more. I'm not a slavish recipe-follower, and while I have the occasional brick when I screw up badly, I have yet to make actually inedible bread in several decades of playing fast and loose with bread recipes. Loaves that were not what I wanted, which I avoided repeating, yes. So bad it went in the garbage rather than be eaten, no. I would ...


3

Should be exactly the same - what you are cooking is the same size, how many you are cooking makes no difference. One cupcake or 50 would take the same amount of time to cook, if that's easier to think of. A pan of boiling water in the oven does not care how many ramekins are in it, so long as there's some space between them


0

Having made everything without "benefit" of a dough hook for years before getting a Kitchen-Aid (which is no Hobart, dough-hook-wise) I'd say it suits everything. I have done all the items mentioned except "hamburger buns" (thick slice of homemade bread and I'm done, there.) On a longer view, I'd suppose there's a few thousand years of baking before the ...


0

If you're making the dough by hand, you can substitute 1:1, expect the bread to rise a bit faster using rapid rise or instant. If you're using a bread machine, use 25% less (slightly over 1 3/4 tsp to substitute rapid rise or instant for one packet of active dry). From King Arthur Flour: One time when you might not want to use instant and active dry ...


0

The cream of tartar gets in the way of sugar's natural tendency to bind together and prevents sugar crystals from forming. makeing a light pillowy texture rather than a sugary crunch


1

As Catija has mentioned, the yeast in beer is dead and typically filtered out. There does exist a class of recipes that are 'beer breads', in which you add beer or similar bubbly beverage ... but they're quick breads, not yeast breads. Unlike using sparkling water in tempura, or beer cider in a beer batter, where you rely on the trapped bubbles to give the ...


2

I don't believe you would want to try to leaven bread with beer only, though you could certainly use it as a flavoring. First, the amount of yeast still present in a brewed batch of beer is very low. Beers that have been bottle carbonated (or bottle conditioned) will have more than others but, particularly with high gravity beers (beers with a lot of ...


1

Baking powder and baking soda work by reacting with other ingredients in your batter and releasing carbon dioxide. When this happens in the oven, these carbon dioxide bubbles become trapped in the batter, giving your cake its lightness and softness. The problem is that if you mix in the baking powder with your liquids and leave it to stand for a while, or ...


3

I suspect the cookies are baked now, but still: If you increase the amount of dough, will you be in trouble? You could just add the sugar now, but that will most likely mess up the texture (still, they are chocolate chip cookies, they are always good ^^) Get the sugar you missed the first time. Calculate your recipe down to the smallest amount you can make ...


1

You could go with a lightweight tempered glass product like vitrelle (aka Corelle). They make bakeware that is lightweight like their dinner plates. You would get all the benefits of traditional glass, without the weight. The other thing you might be thinking of is the plastic carryout containers that are oven safe up to 400 degrees (or whatever its rated ...


3

The material you'd want is silicone. For example, there are silicone baking molds. They are often used in professional kitchen settings, but I'm sure you find find some online. Here's an example. There are probably other kinds of silicone containers that can handle oven well, and they can definitely handle microwave.


0

There is no short or easy answer to this. I spent around 15 years learning to master this. In short, the main factors are: The right flour and balance between water and flour - depends greatly on flour quality. The right kneading - enough to make the gluten into an elastic structure with long threads, but not too much as it will break the structure. The ...


0

You can add the sugar now, what the issue is and will be is that the chocolate will get pulverized some. That's why chips or fruit is added last or folded in.


-2

add some starch to dry up the excess moisture from that banana. but why even use banana?


2

The biggest difference that I know about is that mixing all the dry ingredients means that all you have to do is mix in the wet ingredients into the already homogenous mixture, this allows you to blend less to develop a nice and solid gluten matrix. If you add eggs after flour, all the other ingredients then have to be worked into what is already a dough ...


0

They really shouldn't call these convection ovens. They should be called blower ovens. Normal ovens without the blower are convection ovens with the heat rising up the middle and cooler air falling around the outer lamination (shells) of air. That's convection. When you place a cookie sheet, the hot air mushrooms in from the sides down on top of the cookie ...


2

I can offer an example from work experience. When making flatbread, I shared this with a co-worker. We were docking the rounds to keep them from puffing up like little pillows, for this we want flat breads that are flat. Docking correctly allows for small "pillows" of air, yet the overall product does not rise much. I baked one without docking to demonstrate ...


0

I have been in the kitchen for 30 years and still use a meat thermometer! I can tell when it's done through experience but I want to make sure as sometimes some thicker pieces take longer etc. I would rather be safe when it comes to meat and serving my family.


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It is a "metric" which requires experience to recognize. First, juices "running" clear doesn't mean that they will flow freely. You have to cut into the meat and look at the juice inside it. Is it clear or not? Second, there is a difference between the feel of meat at different stages of doneness, when you poke it with a fork. If you cannot notice it, ...


1

From your description, it seems that you are simply setting it too hot. No need for a resource, just experiment until you have found the correct temperature which works for you. It seems that you expected to just set it 25 degrees lower than the old one. There are three reasons why it might now work. First, this advice usually assumes 25 Celsius, I don't ...


1

A convection oven has a fan that blows hot air around the items being baked. The air flow will draw moisture from the food. To stop the drying out, you could tent the baking items with aluminum foil but that has two drawbacks: you waste aluminum foil and lots of times you do want your baking items to lose moisture during baking. Another issue as you noticed, ...


-2

1.25c (296ml) sugar dissolved in 0.25c (59ml) hot water is equivalent to Light Corn Syrup.


3

No, there is no substitute for gluten, at all. The gluten + soft flour combination is itself a substitute for bread flour, so if you can get bread flour, as Catija suggested, use it. If you can't, you need another recipe. Especially if your goal is to "not make it complicated", don't use substitutes. Substitutes are always complicated. The easy thing is to ...



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