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1

Quick answer: No adjustments mandatory. To explain: You will need to adjust baking times when you change the "lump" of batter to be baked. Examples: Mini or Jumbo muffins instead of regular ones. Coffe cake in a loaf or round pan, bread or rolls. Rule of thumb: thicker cake, more time. That's why you use a wooden skewer to test for doneness. As far as the ...


0

I have been using a small electric oven for two years and cannot add up all the items I have baked in it and thrown out! I have 2 thermostats in the oven, which register the correct temp. However, if I leave the item in the oven per recipe, it will be severely burned on the bottom and sides and dried out. If I take it out early, sometimes bottom is burned ...


1

"Rollfondant" is "Rolled Fondant" or simply "Fondant" I can't say for certain, but I suspect that "Modellierfondant" is also called "Fondant", but a different consistency (and we don't differentiate in English) ... or it's what they call "gumpaste", which is typically used for making flowers and other more delicate items. There's also "modeling chocolate" ...


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The generic term for sugar-water pastes used to decorate food is icing or frosting. Rollfondant sounds like ready-to-roll icing, but it could be royal icing, which contains egg white. Modellierfondant sounds like modelling paste. There are various recipes which use different additives to the core ingredients of sugar and water in order to obtain a suitable ...


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I thought I would try adding baking powder to see if my usually really good Yorkshire puddings would rise any more but no batter went like light cake mixture was a waste of time will stick with my old recipe. If having trouble add another egg I always use 2 and not the recommended one and they are brilliant. Don't know why I messed around


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I still haven't made any cracker but I was in a similar situation with my sourdough, the cooking phase wasn't right and the result was rock hard on the surface . Again, since I haven't tried your recipe or made similar baked goods, this can even possibly be something counterproductive, but try to cook things in the oven with a container ( made of metal or ...


0

Perhaps lower heat and cook longer...or even use a dehydrator? If you have no dehydrator, try your lowest oven setting until dry and set...might take a few hours. You could also try increasing banana (to help it stick together) and reducing or eliminating the butter, which might inhibit drying.


1

I know you are worried about the flavor being bland, but have you tried mixing the aged, dry cheese with one that will melt better? The flavor of a good, mature cheese goes a long way, so I don't think you will notice a loss of flavor... Find a flavorful, relatively young, melty cheese, experiment with the proportions, and give it another try.


1

No, you do not need to peel red potatoes before baking. As others have already said, good basic food hygiene washing and scrubbing plus removal of any eyes or sprouts suffices. I wonder if the emphasis is on red potatoes as opposed to white or black or other colours? I suppose your relative could have been concerned you would not recognise any green ...


-1

The Cooks Illustrated recipe is entirely wrong and you don't need butter layers (or any butter, for that matter, except to grease the pan). Use corn oil (3 tablespoons to every cup of AP flour); no cornmeal (there has never been cornmeal in Chicago deep dish pizza); and a very short mixing (1 minute) and kneading time (2 minutes)--no need to laminate the ...


0

what works good for me (when using flour) is to fill the enchiladas roll em put in pan and bake (without sauce on top) till the tortillias get a little brown on the edges and just barely starting to crisp. Then sauce the top and put on the cheese and bake till cheese is melted. They always come out perfect. With corn i do the same thing but lightly brush ...


1

I would not recommend adding cream of tartar. Your ratio of 1 teaspoon vinegar to stabilize 4 egg whites is standard. My personal preference is to use cream of tartar instead of vinegar if it is available to you - I'd recommend 1/4 teaspoon for 4 egg whites. I assume you have something like 1 cup of sugar going into your meringue as well? See also: How ...


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Haven't tried it with a Sacher, but encountered the doming problem with cheese cakes. In baking those now, I cover the spring form with heavy aluminum, fill a pan, larger than the spring form, with luke warm water, set the spring form in the water and bake. The results have been excellent with virtually no doming after the cake has cooled. Now that you gave ...


0

I've had flare-ups when frying fatty sausages using a broiler or an electric grill in an oven in much the same way that you can get flare-ups on a barbecue. Oven fires can happen when fat builds up in an oven or broiler and hasn't been cleaned, it would be entirely plausible that someone could walk out of the room for a minute and come back to find their ...


1

This is probably obvious. In hindsight it was a thoughtless move: When my wife and I first got married, I was broiling steaks in the oven. I thought I would prepare my own glaze. Bourbon glazes were all the rage at the time. I think you can see where this is going. To my defense, up until then I had never added alcohol to anything except for deglazing in ...


2

Pizza disaster is a fairly common oven horror story. It involves placing a pizza directly on the oven rack, and then having it sag through the wires to burn on the bottom of the oven. Sadly, I'm not finding an easily uploadable image for this answer, but the result can be quite horrifying, and smoky.


0

The scenario you specify isn't very likely to happen. The food in an oven has a very low temperature. A casserole or loaf of bread might get some surface charring after staying for too long in the oven, but it'll need at least half an hour above the normal time for somebody in the next room to notice the smell. And there won't be much smoke and certainly no ...


3

By far the main way you make a smoking mess in your oven is by baking something in too small a vessel, so that it boils over and burns on the bottom of the oven. The actual food can be pretty much anything you want, as long as it has liquid. (Similarly, baking a cake in a springform pan that leaks around the bottom will tend to cause messes.) If you want ...


1

Pavlova is essentially a baked meringue, which is made from egg whites. The purpose of cream of tartar ( tartaric acid ) is to help denature the proteins in the egg whites, making a more stable foam once you whip it and bake it.


-1

cream of tartar is a leavening agent, it makes my puff pastry puff.


2

Compare that recipe to this very similar one from Ina Garten (complete with handy video) Chocolate Buttermilk Cake. Watch her pour. No question, that is a wet batter. Apparently it works fine, Ina's recipe is very highly rated. Both recipes use volumetric measurements (ugh), so I'll use cups. Ina's recipe (sugar is wet (sort of), subject for another ...


0

Any time I've ever added coffee (liquid or crystals), it has imparted flavor. I've never added more than a bit. It doesn't take much to add coffee flavor. I don't know of any other reason to add coffee to a recipe.


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My grandmother's recipe calls for the following (of the ingredients you asked): 1/2 C canola oil 1 tsp baking soda 1/2 tsp salt 1 egg I agree with Jolenealaska; that's too much sugar. Also maybe a bit much flour, but you might be making a loaf which rises to the top of the pan. I prefer oil in this case. It makes the loaf very moist. I almost never ...


1

That is a lot of sugar for that much flour. The salt and baking powder are likely to be one teaspoon each or 3/4 teaspoon each. It probably called for 1/2 cup shortening (consider butter or butter flavored Crisco, but that's just me), and 2 eggs. Give it a shot and let us know how it goes.


0

The acid in cream of tartar denatures some of the egg whites proteins and make the eggs froth up like in stiffer meringue.


2

There are no substitutes for yeast. What you list are not substitutes, but alternative leaveners: either actual baking powder, or a combination of baking soda and lemon juice or yogurt. The milk does not contribute to leavening at all. There is nothing you can do to mimic ordinary yeast or sourdough (which consists mostly of wild yeasts). If you were to ...


0

You can bake in a pizza oven or brick oven or double boiler without water, but when you use pots with closed bottoms you'll end up with smoke and blacken the inside of your large pot. If you can find a large pot and make a hole at the bottom so that flames can pass through, that will be better. Use a rack at least 5 inches above the open fire. That's where ...


1

Still Tasty recommends 1-2 days fridged, 2-3 months frozen. The main problem with storing yeast dough in the fridge is that it will continue to rise ... possibly escaping whtever container you may put it into. If I try to refrigerate a normal bread dough, I'll put it in an oiled container at least 3 times the size of the dough, oil the top of the dough, ...


3

Cast iron is ideal, but any pot that can take the heat and has a tight lid will work. Like @talon8 said in his comment, it doesn't even have to be metal. This article from Around the World in 80 Bakes specifically uses terracotta for sourdough, not cast iron. Just as an FYI, this related question deals with preheating (for no-knead bread, not sourdough), ...


5

No, it has nothing to do with atmospheric moisture. It is the temperature itself. You get much more gluten with cold dough, and it is also very sticky and inelastic. If this is the effect you want, continue doing it. In fact, some authors (e.g. Corriher) recommend making very high hydration doughs with substituting some of the water for crushed ice, to make ...


1

A standard substitute for brown sugar is to take 1 Cup = 200 g of white granulated sugar, and mix-in 1 tablespoon of molasses/treacle. There's a lot of flavor in that tablespoon. My own recommendation would be to either supplement your full 200 g of brown sugar with a tablespoon of treacle or consider using 200 g of granulated sugar and mix-in 2 ...


0

The key to what you're trying to do is to not replace brown sugar, but to make it. Mix white sugar and treacle (or molasses, same thing) in a food processor. Start with about a tablespoon of treacle to 1 cup (200 grams) of white, granulated sugar. You might end wanting two or three times that amount of treacle. Just gauge it by color. That's how brown sugar ...


6

The typical internal temperature at which most bread products are "done" is between 175-200˚F. For a normal pancake batter that is enriched with butter, milk, and/or egg, it would likely fall at the lower end of that range. However, the browned outer crust has likely reached significantly higher temperatures, in the 250-400˚F range.


6

First of all, most guidelines for cooking pancakes recommend using a griddle temperature of 350°-375° F. Cooking at lower temperatures yields tough pancakes. Cooking at MUCH lower temperatures would keep your pancakes from forming in any real way. If there is egg in the recipe for your pancakes, you would need to cook them to an internal temperature of at ...


7

There is no universal substitute for wheat flour. The challenges are, roughly, that recipes will often completely fail if you replace wheat flour with something else. The particular questions you've asked aren't really answerable in a concise way. Yes, taste, texture and aroma can all suffer; yes, baking temperatures can change; yes, making (bread) dough is ...


1

In addition to using floor tiles (I have tiles of about 0.75 cm thick, which isn't enough), I cook my pizzas in two cycles in an electric oven that has a grill function. I put the oven at the highest temperature with the grill function on. Then I place the shelf with the floor tiles as close to the grill/heating elements as possible. I let that heat up ...


1

You can try to add some emulsifiers. Or even use processed cheeses (which contain those emulsifiers).


9

To make your own part-baked rolls, you have to actually part-bake them, not just freeze the shaped dough. You can freeze shaped dough, but you then need to fully thaw it and let it 'wake up' again before baking. You need to part bake at a relatively low temperature so that the dough springs and sets, but a crust does not form. About 20 minutes at ...


2

There may well be more than one issue here. The type of butter. If you're using what is sometimes sold as "cooking butter" then this has a much lower moisture content than normal butter, and so it is very difficult to get the sugar to dissolve enough to cream. Sugar choice. Granulated sugar is much more difficult to cream than than caster (superfine) sugar ...


0

As a starter, Hardees lists the ingredients for their Soft Baked Buns on their website. From there, we can gain that the main ingredients are: All Purpose White Flour Water Sugar Soybean Oil Yeast Additionally, it contains less than 2% of: Wheat Gluten Salt Maltodextrin Food Starch-Modified DATEM Xanthan Gum Whey Dextrin Mixed Triglycerides Enzymes ...


0

After you dunk the dough twists in your alkaline solution, transfer them to a cooling rack to allow the excess liquid to fully drain from the dough before transferring them to your baking sheet. Give them 5-10 minutes to shed as much of their bathwater as possible. And regardless of what type of pan you choose to bake the pretzels on, spray the pan ...


0

What you have is a fairly standard banana bread recipe that you have been baking as muffins. Based on the amounts of your ingredients, this should bake-up just fine in a 9" x 5" loaf pan. At 350° F, on the lower-middle baking rack, a loaf should finish baking somewhere in the 40-45 minute range. Baked as a loaf, test for doneness early and often - a thin ...


1

You can avoid the tray altogether and bake them on a steel rack. Lye doesn't react with stainless steel (or with carbon steel, for that matter). It will stick lightly to the rack, just like anything else on stainless, but due to the small surface, you should be able to separate them. The second way would be to just use enough rock salt on a steel tray so ...


-2

When you say wax paper, I'm assuming you really mean parchment paper (since wax smokes like crazy in the oven). Have you tried nonstick aluminum foil? It works really well for keeping stuff from sticking. Or what about greasing the pan or using ceramic pans? They make ceramic baking pans (like cookie sheets).


0

You need a Silpat! I recommend a half sheet size Silpat and a Stainless Steel Half-Sheet Pan. A Silpat is a silicone mat. It's the most non-stick way to bake anything, and they're quite durable. Buy a couple of mats and you can just swap them out when baking multiple batches. According to folks at The Fresh Loaf the silicone shouldn't react at all with ...


2

Which pan should I use? Volume of a regular muffins 1/3 cup equals about 79 ml 1/4 cup equals about 60 ml --> I take the average of both: 70ml per regular muffin Volume of mini muffins 1/8 cup equals about 30 ml 2 tablespoons equal about 20 ml --> I take the average of both: 25ml per mini muffin Total volume 24 mini muffins ⋅ 25 ml/mini muffin + 4 ⋅ 70 ...


0

If the texture is thick and doughy, it might be because you overmixed the batter. Try divvying up your flour into several portions and sifting those portions onto the batter, then fold (then the next portion, then fold etc). As opposed to dumping all the flour (2 cups is a lot!) and folding like crazy - which is what the text in your question seems to imply ...


0

I often find the easiest way to replace eggs is finding recipes that don't use eggs in the first place. As you specifically ask about Swiss Züpfe (or Zopf, as it is also called), this recipe here Butterzopf klassisch (Bärner Ankezüpfe) and this one here Sonntagszopf use eggs only for the egg wash, but not in the dough, and you should be able to get away by ...


2

I've successfully used flax seed as an egg replacer in my sandwich bread. 1Tbs ground flaxseed mixed with 3Tbs water (per egg), mix & let sit 5 minutes before adding to recipe. Flax adds a bit of nutty flavor, but worth a try for your bread.


1

As the goal is ease of cleanup, and not holding in steam, you may want to consider changing your vessels rather than in lining them: Ceramic dishes are easier to clean up than metal pans. They can also be soaked for long times to loosen up any thing that might get baked on. If you haven't already made the switch, you may want to consider it. You can get ...



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