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The most realistic answer, including many correct comments above, is 99.9999..% dead. Yeast and bacteria can sporulate, and spores can survive very harsh conditions. A spore is basically a solid: a cell which has been dried out, packed with sugars and wrapped in an extra thick cell wall. They are not metabolically active, so they can stay that way for ...


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The thermal death point for yeast cells is 130° F–140° F (55° C–60° C). Most bread is cooked at 200 F or 100 C. The yeast is dead.


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Yeast dies at about 130-140F. Bread is done baking at 200F or so. Almost all the yeast is dead when the bread is done.


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Rumtscho: Thank you for your kindness to me in the past and even now. I read and re-read the question and I believe I answered in a productive way, even though long-winded and gave extra information. I even feel that was the exact receipe I use and tried to be very precise about how to go about making the receipe work. When I read the "Unsalted Butter" ...


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Sunflower seed butter (also called "sunflower butter") is nut-free, and we use it on sandwiches for a friend with a peanut allergy. Its consistency is essentially identical to peanut butter (it sticks well to bread). The biggest issue is that the flavor is somewhat different, although that varies somewhat from brand to brand (one brand, which I ...


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you need a Candy thermometer. Sugar needs to be heated to the soft or hard crack temps in order to set as desired. If the sugar does reach the needed temp, then it won't do what you wanted. Hard crack makes hard candies, soft crack makes softer but firm candies.


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Your Sugar was having water content more than desired & hence it could have been runny. My Cough Candy Recipe 1 Cup Sugar 1/2 Cup Water 1 Table Spoon Honey 1 Table Spoon Lemon Juice 1 Tea Spoon Dry Ginger Powder 1 Tea Spoon Licorice Powder 1/2 Tea Spoon Clove Powder Methodology: Mix all Ingredients in a Open Mouth Vessel When all contents are ...


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i only have one recipe that calls for breadcrumbs, which is my hungarian torte (uses almond meal) and I use fine purchased breadcrumbs. I've never really noticed them but the cake does come out nicely. There's no issue from a flavour perspective as they're often used in sweet foods (like strudel) to absorb the moisture in the fillings. I would use flour ...


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My own experience diverges somewhat from the celebrated Tartine experience. Don't get me wrong, I think it is an amazing book and an amazing bakery...it's just that my experience is not commensurate with the book. First of all, remember that the Tartine bakers who made the starter in the book are, themselves, covered with the natural yeast from working in ...


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I expect the "crust" will puff up significantly since it has chemical leavening agents in it, unlike traditional pastry crust. Using pie weights would help. Docking the crust (poking with a fork) would help, but might not work with a liquid filling. If you prepared the pudding separately, chilled it to semi-firm, then poured it in that might work better. ...


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Using breadcrumbs is not that unusual in the US, I found out especially in the Southern States. First issue to address is the breadcrumbs that we see on the chocolate cake. This is most likely due to the fact that the breadcrumbs were not processed fine enough. An example would be dried bread processed finely in a food processor or fine breadcrumbs ...


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The short: The stretch and fold method is my favorite technique for building big bubbles and strong gluten structure to support a taller loaf of bread. This does require more time and doesn't really work with the stand mixer method. The long: I've found that a loaf spreading rather than "springing" is a function of a number of things. It took me about 6 ...


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Gelatin takes ~2weeks to fully set to it's final texture, and before then it will melt more easily, as the gelatin molecules are not "fully locked" in position. TSPP is used at an extremely low rate to help Gelatin set quicker, it has been termed " vitamin pills for Gelatin" buy an old Corn products syrup expert who used to tour the world helping folks, he ...


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The Cooks Country recipe for Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies is very similar to the one you're using. For the purpose of method comparison and ratios I'm putting it here. I've adjusted what measurements I can to metric. It's behind a paywall, unfortunately but I'll put it here for now... If I should remove it, please let me know. As you may notice everything ...


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Your egg and butter mix has curdled/split you need to put it in a fresh floured bowl and keep mixing till smooth. The brown is, as you mentioned, the brown sugar. Nothing to worry about. Personally I wouldn't use melted butter at all. Rather I would use soft butter. Creaming sugar and butter with melted butter is impossible, especially if the butter is ...


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Of course, a grated apple is literally wet, but this has little to do with what "type of ingredient" it is. Kitchen tradition just uses confusing names for the ingredients which go into the two different piles of a two-step method. Dry ingredients don't have to be literally dry, and wet ingredients don't have to be literally wet. I find Erica's approach ...


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Apple is pretty wet. However, if you're looking at quickbread or muffin recipes (with "wet" and "dry" teams, a la Alton Brown's method), you're better off treating it as a separate addition -- stir the grated apple in after the wet and dry are combined.


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The most important part of getting a good rise is the way that you pour the batter in the the tray. You must pour a thin stream directly in to the middle of the tray circle. Heat the oil 1) Turn the oven on to 200 degrees centigrade and place a rack in the top half of the oven 2) Put oil in to the Yorkshire pudding trays circles and place in the oven ...


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In India the "Bhalia" wheat variety seems to be the closest match to the red wheat found in western countries containing high gluten, A study also found it to be superior for bread making. This variety is only grown and licensed exclusively in a region named "Bhal" in Gujarat India and is very difficult to source. "Khapli" wheat is another high gluten ...


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If your crumb is not open you likely either underproofed, your dough is too dry, or you have not opened the dough up by cutting across the top. There are many very good questions about crumb on this site already so I won't go more into that in detail, instead I'll move onto shaping. Bread will spread out and not up unless it's restrained, it's natural for ...


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Wet. You'll notice how much apple juice you end up with when you try to grate an apple.


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I have tried many recipes that contained rum and I substituted it with a concentrated mixture of orange and lemon juice and the result was quite good. The mixture is made by boiling the juices and allowing it to reduce (shed off some moisture via evaporation).


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I have only ever used all purpose flour myself. As a young bread maker I did not know about bread flour, gluten, etc. Now I know about it, I live somewhere where I can not obtain it. To add insult to injury the all purpose flour here tends to have a rather low gluten content. That being said, with the exception of one type of bread I have always had very ...


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It should be OK, especially if you are purchasing already homogenized almond milk. If you are using homemade almond milk, your glaze won't be perfectly smooth, which may or may not bother you. Your "glaze" is a standard ganache, and it can be, in principle, made with water or any real dairy. The only purpose of the liquid is to change the consistency of ...


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Have you tried the recipe before? In that case, I would just add almond milk until it reached the same consistency as with heavy cream. If you've done any similar recipes before, I would do the same. Start with maybe 1/4 cup almond milk, and then add more (1tbsp at a time) until you reach the correct consistency to use it as a glaze.


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I asked a friend baker to help him for a night, so I could improve my home bread. They use machines to knead the bread as they prepare a lot of dough (25-30 kg of flour at a time). The machines I've seen have two speeds (speed I and speed II) and you can set the timer for both (my friend puts 5 minutes on I then 20 minutes on II) so the mixer switches ...


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Go the old-fashioned route and simply butter your pan. Worked for our grandmothers, still works today ;-)


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This is good for a recipe such as one with liquid and dry rice. But I have found it cooks so slowly that it doesn't ever boil or cook the meat in it until I take the foil off, then I see in 5 minutes boiling on the outer edge. I usually have to do both, covered and uncovered. It just takes much longer than the recipe says covered.


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It's the handling of the dough. Too much will yield hard scones. Less is more. Once dry and wet are mixed, that's enough. It may feel a little sticky but leave it alone. Let it rest for 10 minutes before shaping then bake.


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The recipe you've found looks like "crazy cake" or "wacky cake" (or "depression cake"), which is a fairly common egg-free cake. I've made it a number of times for a friend with an egg allergy and it's a very good vegan cake. To make a vanilla version, leave out the cocoa powder and increase the vanilla extract slightly (1.5 teaspoons). There are a wide ...


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Glucose is very expensive, unlike caster sugar (sucrose, also commonly called "table sugar") which does the job, and is much easier to work with. Glucose in the modern kitchen is only really used in meringues.


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The key is not to roll it too thin nor too thick, it should be as thick as pound coin. Then once you've rolled and put the pastry in tin place back into the fridge for 10-20 minutes. (For Yanks, according to the Royal Mint, a pound coin is 3.15mm, which would be about 1/8")


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I would definitely try that, just by increasing the flour or decreasing the water to 1 cup to compensate for the 1/4 cup of cocoa you're not putting in. I make a recipe very similar to this (1 cup sugar, 1/3 cocoa, 1 cup water, 1/2 cup oil, whatever flour, whatever vinegar, the rest the same) about twice a week, and the cupcakes/muffins come out great. So ...


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In my experience, the best cheesecake is made in a glass pyrex pan, 9 or 10 inches, if you can find it or most likely have it or your mom or grandma or aunt. Bake it on 300 degrees, making your own graham cracker crust with unsalted butter, vanilla, and sugar, using 16 to 24 ounces cream cheese, 2 to 3 eggs, one half to three quarter cups sugar, real ...


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You'll run into another problem when you take the cake out of the fridge -- condensation. Air will cool when it's near the cake, and the moisture in it will condense on the cake, possibly causing odd dots when you try to blot it dry. (possibly smearing the icing, or the water could cause problems on decorated cakes with any variations in color) You have a ...


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I love slow cooked baby-back-ribs. Yesterday, about eight hours before my company arrived, I preheated my oven to 350 degrees. I then took the baby-back-ribs out of the package and removed the membrane. I then put on a store bought dry rub and sealed the ribs in aluminum foil. I also did the same thing with a package of fajitas, except I used fajita ...


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Did you overcook it? Overcooking will often cause eggs to weep not-insignificant amounts of liquid. You can see this trivially if you overcook scrambled eggs - you'll get essentially "egg curds in soup".


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I did attempt too make hard blue candy for a "Disney Frozen" birthday cake with golden syrup. Now I know why they say "use corn syrup" - as the golden syrup affects the color of the candy. While the color was wrong the candy came out really nice.


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Silicone can be made to conduct heat well, but I doubt that's the type on your sheet. A lot of the browning comes from infrared (radiated) heat that the metal sheet is great at emitting. Silicone will likely buffer the radiated heat and not allow the browning effect (Millard's reaction) the same way steel would. My guess is you'll get more browning on ...


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I found a use! If you melt out all of the seeds and then don't agitate the chocolate at all while it's cooling, you end up with a ganache-like paste that works pretty well for making vegan, allergen-free truffles and spreads.


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I just made a brownie box mix according to directions. I baked them at 325 degrees in a dark non stick mini muffin pan with each section given a spritz of PAM. Baked for 15 minutes, no extra fuss. Upon removal from oven I let them sit about 1-2 minutes, turned the pan upside down and they slipped out easily. Brownies were moist - PERFECT!


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Puff pastry will catch fire it you put it too close to the heating spiral. It can rise outside of the original container and touch the heating elements, at which point it will catch fire. It also smokes intensely. (Yes, this is from experience)


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I once caused a fire in a comercial kitchen by refilling the deep fat fryer but only a little in the bottom I went to fetch some more oil when I came back it was on fire. Now the flames were very high but it was quite easy to put out with a fire blanket but for it to lead to a full scale inferno would be for someone yo attempt to extinguish the flames with ...


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You should try with the storemade cheese again. Use cloth diapers (new) as cheese cloth. Let it set overnight in a strainer with a plate and a heavy jar over the plate. It will take out alot of water.


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Absolutely. There are only a few cases where parchment and grease/flour are not interchangeable and whoopie pies are not one of them.


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I believe that if you have a convection oven that it doesn't matter, heat is distributed evenly throughout. If you have an electric oven than the temperature is most accurate towards the back. You may notice that when the oven is on that one of the back burners will radiate heat. I get the most accurate temperature reading with mine hanging off the top rack ...


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Absolutely no difference. The small volume that the nuts take up is not enough to change the consistency of the product. Around here they sell extra-crunchy.


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For cooking, salt, (sea salt if you prefer it) seasoned salt, whole peppercorns and a grinder. For seafood we like Old Bay or Tony Cachere's seasoning. Chili powder, cayenne pepper, dried red pepper flakes, a jar of roasted red peppers, basil pesto. Dried herbs (or grow your own if you have a green thumb), basil for tomato sauces, garlic and oregano. For ...



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