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10

If you let it sit in the sauce overnight then it's no longer a sauce, it's a marinade. That's fine, but marinating is something you generally do with tough, cheap, and/or dry cuts of meat such as chicken breasts or top rounds (beef). For a full chicken, especially the wings, drumsticks and thighs, a marinade is entirely unnecessary and in my humble opinion ...


7

I like to take a nice center cut pork loin and cook it in a slow cooker (crock pot) for 8 hours in homemade bbq sauce. When it's done, take it out, use two forks to shred it, then put the shredded pieces back into the sauce to coat. Mmmm...homemade pulled pork. Freezes really well in individual portions, too. Another option is to use it to marinade a ...


5

It all depends on the sauce. If it's thick, or if it contains a lot of sugar, then it can scorch over high heat. For something like that, I'd put the sauce on at the very end, or serve it on the side. If it's thinner (something based on wine, vinegar, fruit juice, soy sauce, etc) then it's absolutely OK to put it on before grilling, or marinate the chicken ...


4

You don't actually have to refrigerate ketchup. Once it's opened it's good for a month or so with no appreciable change. After that the flavour and colour starts to degrade, but it's still safe to eat. Worcestershire sauce is fermented for more than a year before it's bottled, so it will change at a much slower rate than an acidic, but unfermented sauce ...


4

BBQ sauce pizza w/ chicken, red onion, cheddar/american, etc... As sauce for enchiladas, tacos, quesadilas, etc.... BBQ wings. A spicy, cheesy casserole w/ corn, green beans, pasta, etc... Add some to spaghetti sauce for a kick. Obviously, sauce for just about any meat.


4

The easiest solution would be to add a thickening agent to your sauce. Which agent will depend on how much you are willing to have the texture of the sauce change in order to achieve a good suspension. One of the easiest methods, if you are also willing to alter the flavor profile in the direction of South Carolina or Germany, would be to add mustard. ...


4

Rule number one with sauces: don't miss an opportunity to add some flavor. The worst thing you can make is a bland sauce, and while I doubt a little water or watery store-bought broth would bland this one up, I'd use whiskey myself. It's liquid, the flavor should be compatible, and I've never seen a college student who couldn't lay his hands on a bottle. ...


4

You haven't given us much information to go on here, but I'm assuming your dry rub is a mixture of dried spices and possibly sugar. If that's the case, I would fry some onions and garlic and add the spices (not the sugar, which will burn) to them while they soften. Then I would add the usual BBQ sauce staples - ketchup, vinegar, some water, and the sugar ...


3

Rule #1 is always: When in doubt, throw it out. Nobody here can guarantee that it is safe. If you didn't pasteurize (or sterilize depending on acidity) then there is always a chance of dangerous contamination. That being said, Worcestershire and and molasses are both shelf-stable while bourbon (alcohol), lemon juice (acid), and vinegar (acid) are all types ...


3

We make our own pizzas and one thing we like to do is mix BBQ sauce with the tomato puree to go on the base - gives it a bit of a twist from normal pizza. Also, often I'll squirt a bit into shepherds or cottage pie with the meat to make it a bit different from normal.


3

We do ribs in an oven (no grill, but this works great on a grill if you have it) for about 2 hours wrapped in foil, remove foil, and add barbecue sauce at the end to cook on. We do a spice rub to begin with. Truly tasty!


3

The weather is a bit warm for it, but I use bbq sauce in my chili when I make it.


3

Sometimes it's okay to use store-bought chicken stock/broth. To get a little extra flavor in it, chop up some mirepoix (carrots, celery, onions in a 1:1:2 ratio) and boil the stock with the vegetables for an hour or so. Yes, store-bought stock is pretty awful compared to homemade, but there are so many flavorings in that recipe that you can get away with ...


2

Considering the sheer number of rather strong ingredients in that recipe - if it were me and I didn't have stock and didn't want to make or buy any...I'd substitute broth as a first option and salted water as a second option.


2

If I don't have any stock ready or chicken bones to hand then I just reach to the cupboard and open a stock cube or granules. On a side point, stock freezes very easily so if in future you buy whole chickens, you can make stock with the bones and then pop it in the freezer for later use.


2

Dennis, Welcome to the site! Generally we focus on the "how to make food" side here, but I thought I'd suggest some things to consider from a layman's perspective. There is no standard formula for how to figure this out because so much depends on your exact situation. (The amount of meat per sandwich is the result of your own cooking style.) Be ...


2

I haven't tried it with barbecue sauce, but I've had good luck freezing other sauces. Could you freeze it in batches large enough for one generous order of barbecued meat?


1

There is no definitive way to answer this without knowing the specific formulations of the products in question, which is almost certainly proprietary to the producing company. It is likely that the so-called barbecue sauce is in fact more than tomato sauce mixed with Worcestershire; it may be more acidic than the the tomato sauce, giving it greater ...


1

If I've understood the question correctly, there are a few possibilities: The vinegar you have used is too strong - some vinegars are milder than others You have boiled off so much water that the whole sauce is much stronger than it should be Something about your calculations or measurements was off Number 2 is the most likely. Larger volumes will take ...


1

No matter the option, the rub will be an accent to the sauce, not a main flavor. So it would be best to envision it that way from the beginning. It's actually a really good way to coalesce the spices you would add to your sauce, so that you don't have to do duplicate work. Just make double the rub you normally would, reserve half of it (PLEASE be sure you do ...


1

I wouldn't trust it to still be safe. You didn't sterilize the container first, and you absent any qualitative analysis of the overall Ph of your ingredients, I would assume it's not acidic enough to inhibit growth.


1

In that recipe, I'd substitute water, or omit entirely. There's plenty of flavor in the other ingredients, and it doesn't seem to be for texture. (If it was, a little gelatin would do the trick.)


1

Found this... http://www.copykatchat.com/sauces/7118.htm I've never been there, so I can't judge; but might be a good place to start.



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