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21

From a food safety point of view, no. There is no danger, because the meat contains no pathogens after overcooking. From a "healthy living" point of view, it might be a problem, because you can have created carcinogens by charring. But we don't discuss such topics here, because nobody in the world knows how much eating charred meat contributes to the risk ...


14

I rarely ever recommend boiling the heck out of meat. You are washing away all of the flavor. Remember water is a solvent and remove everything from the meat if it is left to boil long enough. For the most tender ribs I would recommend a braise. The slow, low, moist cooking of a braise is perfect for breaking down connective tissue in the ribs without ...


14

A very simple answer why you prick sausages. When the sausages get heated up, the fat content and also air pressure inside start to grow. Pricking sausgaes allow the air and fat to be 'released', otherwise, the skin of the sausages will start to crack which eventually will result in losing more juice and 'fat'. Yes, Pricking may lead to dry sausages, so you ...


14

Here in Argentina is very common to bbq LOTS of sausages for big parties. Just for reference: To ease the work of turning them, we usually hold them together with metal skewers, that also serve the purpose of draining the fat: But if you don't prick them (besides of the aforementioned holes), they usually EXPLODE. Note: here the skins are usually ...


13

Perfect. Sounds like your pizza stone is nicely seasoned. Scrub it with your stiffest brush, rinse with water, no soap, done. If you're paranoid about germs, cook it before cooking on it. Throw it in the oven at a few hundred degrees, for 15 minutes or so. Ideally, you're supposed to heat the stone (thus sterilizing it) before slapping the pizza upon ...


12

Common noob mistakes: Cooking things too long. Meat dries out when it's cooked to too high an internal temperature. That's the whole thing, and it's true no matter how you cook something. If you like your meat to be completely devoid of pink inside, it will be dry. No avoiding it. Find out what's a good temperature for the doneness you desire, and use an ...


12

A grill basket perhaps? I've no luck finding the term for your specific description, but that seems to be an umbrella term for utensils that basically hold something so you can more easily grill it.


12

The strongest wood is not always the best wood. Mesquite is by far the strongest smoke wood. But it can be a disaster on anything but beef or fast-cooked foods. Hickory is a good complement to barbecued pork, and is the traditional wood for Carolina barbecue. I like to use hickory and cherry with pulled pork and ribs, myself.


11

Your ribs will have a lot less flavor if you do not use a dry rub. However you can minimize some of the time (and only a bit of the flavor) by putting on the rub, wrapping in foil, and immediately putting them in the oven or on the grill. The process of putting your rub together probably takes only about 5 minutes - it's the fridge time that takes a while. ...


10

When you're talking about briquettes, much of the "ash" you're talking about is actually clay and binders to hold the briquette together. That also tends to mean a cooler burning form of charcoal. Overall, charcoal is made by taking wood (or a few other materials, but usually hardwood) and heating it to burning temperatures without enough oxygen for it to ...


10

If you let it sit in the sauce overnight then it's no longer a sauce, it's a marinade. That's fine, but marinating is something you generally do with tough, cheap, and/or dry cuts of meat such as chicken breasts or top rounds (beef). For a full chicken, especially the wings, drumsticks and thighs, a marinade is entirely unnecessary and in my humble opinion ...


9

I'm confused. You don't want fake smoke but you don't want to use wood? Are you asking for a synthetic substance you can burn that will not be worse for the environment than burning wood? First of all- burning wood is not bad for the environment- that carbon has not been sequestered and so it would be released into the atmosphere anyway when the wood ...


9

There are several studies linking foods cooked at high temperatures, and especially charred foods, to an increased risk of cancer. So far these studies have only been conducted on animals, so there is no conclusive proof that it has the same effect on humans, but as humans are animals, it would seem at least possible. The National Cancer Institute has a ...


9

You can save yourself the waste of making double, while preventing cross-contamination, by using one hand (clean) to scoop and sprinkle, and one hand (dirty) to direct the spice falling, pat/tamp, and rub the spices. Typically I begin by applying a "glue" (previously I have used honey and mustard, once I was vegan I went with just mustard; both worked ...


8

Buy a cedar plank. Soak it in salted water for a couple of hours Rub the salmon with olive oil and season it with a little bit of salt, I use kosher salt or smoked sea salt but regular table salt will work just fine. Then put the salmon on top of the plank, skin side down. Then put the plank on the BBQ. You can see the fish cook, it will get pinkish-white ...


8

Don't bother soaking them. Dried hardwood doesn't readily soak up water, so for this to work you'll have to either soak for a rather long time or start with green wood... but if you're using green wood then you don't need to soak it. For good, consistent smoke, you want to control heat and airflow: as hobodave notes, you can control heat by simply moving ...


8

I have neither cooked nor eaten kangaroo, but I think the information that it is very lean should be sufficient to answer this question. Smoking is a low and slow technique that is used to make tough cuts of meat tender. This works by using a low temperature to break down the tough connective tissues which makes the end result both tender and moist. This ...


8

Well, there is always cooking it super rare. That's usually my method. And it's healthier that the other options, discounting possible foodborne illness. However the more traditional responses are barding and larding. In short, just because the meat doesn't come with fat, doesn't mean that fat can't be added. In the case of barding, you just put a little ...


7

A couple of suggestions to help maintain constant heat. Time it such that you are only adding a little fuel at any one time. Adding half new fuel will cool down considerably as it has to catch, burn, etc. Adding 10% fresh at one time is much better, for example. Conversely, if you're lookin' you ain't cookin'. Open as little as possible. Remember there ...


7

Salmon, Tuna, Snapper, and Monkfish, as already mentioned. Swordfish is also great. Skin on Trout. Generally, what you want to avoid are very flaky fish as they will stick to the grill and fall apart when you try to take them up. A meaty fish is more likely to stay together. It helps greatly if you oil your grill well before putting the meat on and re-oil ...


7

Salmon is very good when it's grilled on a cedar plank. The smoke from the cedar flavors the meat while it's cooking and gives it a great flavor. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y4R90J5p_Yo You can buy cedar planks at many cooking stores.


7

i made a smoked salmon recently that used tea leaves (from tea bags, specifically chai and a black tea with citrus), and it was very subtle and awesome. highly recommended. i used, i believe, 3 tea bags total, plus 2T of brown sugar and 2T of white rice in a lightly folded foil packet.


7

I'd say no never prick the sausages if you can help it. the fat inside helps to keep them succulent and moist, and if you have a problem with the splitting and are pricking them to release the pressure as was stated by @foodrules, then I'd say you are cooking them over too high a heat. Lower the heat, or if you are BBQing move them further from the source, ...


7

Basically, what you need to do is create a baffle that distributes the smoke further into the main chamber. Checkout the mod #3 in this PDF for a CharGriller Smokin' Pro modification. http://www.deejayssmokepit.net/Downloads_files/CharGrilleMods.pdf You can do this same thing with tin foil if you're on the low budget plan.


7

Don't worry about the pork contaminating the chicken, but rather vice versa. A good rule of thumb with chicken is to treat it as a biohazardius contaminant. Because it is. Salmonella is present IN chicken meat, unlike other meats where you will only find microbes on the surface. Your marinade doesn't seem particularly inhospitable to pathogen growth, so ...


6

The key is to slow-cook them on low heat, and keep the lid/door closed for at least two hours. Here's my fool-proof method for fall-off-the-bone baby back ribs that anyone can do... Make sure you know where to get good fresh pork (pay the cost to be the boss) Cut membrane off the bone-side of the slab (optional, I don't like its chewiness) Use your ...


6

The secret is simple: Cook them slowly, at lower temperatures.


6

I can't tell you what to do but I can tell you one thing not to do: don't chop up the bones, they're very brittle and if you do you'll end up with little shards of bone all over the place; especially bad if you make a rabbit stew; joint the bones instead.


6

You would use raw corn. You can either grill it on the cob, or use a mesh grill roasting pan.


6

I always do when pan-frying - it's astonishing how much fat comes out. I prefer the resulting texture. Barbequed sausages really can't be pricked much because of flareups, and I usually try to eat something else if I have a choice, because I find them too greasy. Perhaps my "just right" is someone else's "too dry" - it's certainly true that pricking them ...



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