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1

The source of the bubbles is trapped carbon dioxide, which was created by fermentation in the pizza dough. The problem with using a BBQ grill to make pizza is that you simply can not contain the high heat needed for the perfect crust. As you probably know, a traditional pizza oven has a low ceiling, with its opening at the front. This allows, not only the ...


1

The bubbles in Neapolitan pizza come from air, emitted by live yeast in the pizza dough, expanding when it's headed up. While bubbles can be created by baking the pizza on a stone, it's not required. You'll also get bubbles by just rubbing some oil on the grill grates and placing the pizza dough directly on the grill. The key to getting bubbles is having ...


2

You can use any non-poisonous wood you like Every wood has a different heat and smoke profile. "Soft woods" like birch will generally burn very short for a short time, so OK for sausages, small meat cuts, and small vegetables, but not so good for large meat cuts, roasts, or for BBQ'ing covered for the full smoke effect as you will most likely need to ...


1

From the phrasing of your question, it sounds like you want to put the pizza directly on the grate of your grill (without a pizza stone). If that's true, then I think the secret to using a thin crust is how you handle it as you transfer it to the grate. To have your thin crust survive, build it on a flat board (e.g. a wooden cutting board) with enough ...


1

I mostly agree with Elendil's answer: most kinds of pizza dough can be made thinner simply by stretching the dough more (and pausing to rest for a minute or two if it starts to spring back). Wetter doughs will generally stretch more easily with less "spring back," but they can also rip more easily. Which you prefer is kind of up to you. I would add three ...


2

The secret to getting a thin crust is... use less dough. It's that simple. Pizza dough is flour, water, salt, yeast: there is no magic ingredient that will make it thinner. Simply use less dough per pizza. You may find that when you first shape the dough it will try and spring back. In this case, just cover it and leave it for 5 minutes for the gluten to ...


2

You should be able to cook on your grill using various types of wood such as hickory, mesquite, cherry, maple, apple, etc. Per Recipetips.com , birch can be used also. Birch - A softer wood, Birch is best used when grilling or smoking cuts of pork and poultry, providing a flavor similar to some varieties of maple. Birch is a softer wood and can also ...


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Birch is far too hot and quick-burning for a barbecue. Even hardwood (oak, maple, etc) will have too much flame and not enough heat for good grilling. You need a fuel that burns long and with a lot of radiated heat, which is why charcoal is the classic fuel.


16

Harold McGee's "On Food and Cooking" has an interesting explanation on the chemistry of smoke (pg 448 on my edition). This is a summary of what it says: The three main component of wood are: Cellulose Hemicellulose Lignin (Source: Wikimedia) Cellulose and hemicellulose make up the "scaffold" of plant cells and ligning binds cells together. These ...


4

The smoky flavour of barbecued foods is best achieved through burning lump charcoal or hardwood. In the scenario you're describing, yes, burning hardwood and then cooking over the coals would give you a smoky flavour Store bought briquettes actually probably give you less of a smoky flavour because instead of using wood, many briquettes use other ...


2

The chicken stay moist because it cooks quickly (very high temperature); it does not have the time to dry out. I would imagine that the cook time must be controlled because it can over-cook very quickly. The yogurt marinade will impart some flavor and help tenderize the meat.


1

I would not use a regular pan on a wood fire bbq grill (even on a stone). You can use a cast iron dutch oven (or maybe a Japanese cast iron rice cooker). After that, you will need to keep control of the heat your grill generates at it can get really hot in a dutch oven. Nice grill btw.


0

Put a large pan under it catch the drippings and you will not have a fire.


1

If you prick your sausages, you are in the wrong. It defeats the purpose of fat in there in the first place. If you prick them, they dry out. If the casings burst, you're cooking on too high a heat. Cook on a lower heat for an extended time, and the casings caramelise... oh mama! Do not season with salt or pepper before you cook them, the salt will draw ...


0

There was not too much fat in the lamb. This will happen with just anything you can put a stake through, I think. If you are rotissering something small enough to fit over just the center burner, you could do it that way with the center burner completely off. You can also remove the grills and and place a try on top of the heat foils in the center to ...



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