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18

Consistent results stem from consistent actions. Bechamel is one of the most basic sauces, so you should take the time to master it. The general proportions for this sauce are: 1 Tbsp butter (clarified optional) 1 Tbsp flour 1 cup milk 1/2 tsp salt 1/8 tsp nutmeg The things to make sure you do right: Cook the roux - It should be a nice golden hue (not ...


12

A lot of how you make a béchamel is technique -- here's how I learned (from my italian great grandmother). You'll need a wooden spatula for stirring, or a wooden spoon if you don't have the spatula. Melt some butter (exact amount depends on how much thickening power you're trying to get, I'd typically use 2-3 TB), and let it foam a little bit, but not ...


10

First, you don't specify if you mean cream of coconut, or coconut milk. I think coconut milk would be the thing to try here, as it has less fat. Second, if it works, it won't be bechamel any more. But this is a technical detail: if it is tasty to you, you should be able to use it as a substitution practically everywhere. Third, does it work? I haven't ...


9

I think you've answered your own question. It adds an elusive flavor that most people feel enhances the creamy flavors.


6

Pre-grated. Don't use pre-grated cheese for any sauce where consistency matters. Pre-grated cheeses are almost universally coated with cellulose to prevent clumping. This will muck up a good sauce every time. If it's going into a lasagna or a mac & cheese though, chances are it will go unnoticed by any but the cook.


6

Yes. The important fat is the one the starch first goes into. The higher temperature reached by fats (as compared to water or milk) helps cook the flour, creating flavors. The liquid added later dilutes the mixture into a sauce. The liquid's fats are not as crucial for the sauce's thickness as the liquid's proteins. I think of the cooked butter-flour ...


5

In Italy with Pasticcio we are usually referring to other kind of pasta rather than the lasagna noodle. The classic lasagna and pasticcio are made with ragù and besciamella, but there are lots of different types. For example I simply love the white lasagna with artichokes! Disclaimer: as almost the totally of the italian dishes this differs from region to ...


5

You could always blend before you strain. I find that when making soup of all kinds that a few minutes with my immersion blender does wonders for the final product. Not only does it puree all the solids into much smaller chunks, but it also makes sure that all the liquid is a homogeneous whole. After blending, I also tend to strain just to get out ...


5

I ended up getting the recipe from the chef himself! It turns out that gelatin makes little sense at the temperatures involved unless you up the quantity in which case the texture gets altered for the worse (I experimented only twice so I can't really be sure that it wouldn't work at all). The recipe itself calls for a bechamel with a very light roux ...


5

Gordon says "white sauce", which is a simpler term for bechamel-based sauces and is quite common when making lasagna. Yet the stuff that gets stirred in the bowl looks somewhat "fluffier" than classic bechamel and when it's piped has a "raggedness" that plain bechamel doesn't have, but smoother that pure ricotta. My conclusion: it's hard to say for certain,...


4

If the soy is "sweetened", I would not suggest using it in a savory sauce. However, if it is unsweetened, it should be ok. I personally like soy, but it all depends on the brand, and whether full fat, sweetened, plain or vanilla as to how I would use it. You might try baking with it, perhaps muffins, cake or biscuits - and substituting the soy for whatever ...


4

As you see from the variety of advise from reputable sources, many combinations of hot/cold roux and liquid will work. From a convenience point of view, you want at least one of them hot in order to speed the integration. If you started both of them cold, it would probably work but take a while to warm up to melt the butter in the roux, and free the flour ...


4

After spending more time on search engines and thanks to the comment from belisarius... Medium refers to the thickness level of the final sauce, and is controlled by the ratio of roux (butter/flour) to milk. For 1 cup of milk: thin = 1 tablespoon each flour/butter medium = 2 tablespoons each flour/butter (a "standard" bechamel) thick = 3 tablespoons each ...


4

Quark doesn't melt at all. What you can do is to stir it into the sauce. From there on, it depends on the version you have available. I haven't seen the Polish one. If it is firm and crumbly like some of the quarks I've had, it will remain that way in the sauce, and you will have a grainy texture. The German type is similar to yogurt in texture, and it ...


3

Lasagne al forno is a pasticcio. So is pretty much any pasta al forno. Lasagna is one of many pasticcios you could make -- unless you're talking to a Bolognese, in which case they'll insist that the only proper name for the lasagne dish is lasagne -- or better, lasagne Bolognese of course :) Only person on the Internet I've seen that gets it right: http://...


3

Lasagne is the Italian name for the noodles used in a lasagna casserole. So it would be technically incorrect to use it for a casserole made with a different type of noodles. And I'm not aware of any other use of lasagne noodles, so while you will probably have to call your soup "lasagne soup" if it contains them, and Italians will also use the term "lasagne ...


3

The main difference is lasagna tends to have wide flat noodles, and tends to be a dish made within the inspirations of the Italian cuisine. Pasticcio tends to use other pastas (such as penne), and the flavor elements may be inspired by the greater variety of flavors found around the Mediterranean, such as cinnamon in a Greek-based version. Both are ...


3

In Italy we usually mix béchamel and tomato sauce for "Pasta al forno" (or "pasta pasticciata") and lasagna, in order to not have a full distinction in the final dish between the two sauces and their tastes. However this is not mandatory, but my grandma, my mum and me are used to do it (and I see some other people doing the same). P.s. I live in Italy and ...


3

I decided to test it anyway, so here are the results of a bechamel using 1 part soy to 2 parts regular milk: Taste: There was nothing on the label to indicate the soy was sweetened, so I went ahead as if it were unsweetened. However, the sauce was much sweeter than usual, and on checking the ingredients, I note that there is 2% raw sugar (as well as 1% ...


3

There is actually a specialized tool for making sure that your blended soups are the right consistency: a food mill. I own one that's almost exactly the same as the one pictured, and it's incredibly useful for soups. Other versions have interchangeable bottoms to allow you to mill your food to the exact texture you want.


3

In order to get a soup through a sieve, take a ladle and stir it in the sieve while touching the mesh. This works loads better than a spoon or spatula. I think the advantage is more contact with the sieve due to the shape. Instead of pushing liquids out of the way as with a spatula, you actually push it through the sieve. I was amazed how much more effective ...


3

A piece of equipment you might really enjoy is a conical strainer (a chinois, pejoratively known as a china cap). They can be hard to find in a home kitchen store, but hit a restaurant supply and they will have them in several sizes of cone and hole. When you strain a soup or sauce through it, you can agitate it with a ladle to move the clogging stuff out of ...


2

temperature. I would turn down the heat on the sauce, and take it a little bit slower, to avoid making the lumps in the transitions of the sauce.


2

I would recommend making too much sauce and allowing the dish to sit in the oven, in a heavy casserole dish covered with aluminum foil, at 150'F; this will allow you to bypass danger zone concerns for as long as the dish remains edible. At 150'F it should last quite awhile and the sauce should only reduce minimially depending on how long it is in there. My ...


2

You could make it beforehand, store it in the fridge, and warm it up in the microwave when you want it. You'll only get problems if you add cream - then it may split. It really is not worth the risks of having it sitting around. The alternative is to have your roux prepared, and work the sauce up quickly.


2

I've heard a few different answers (theories) as to why you should use different temperature liquids to the roux, most of it's related to starch gelatinization. I'm also not a fan of scalding milk when I don't have to, as it can bubble over if you don't pay attention and/or taken on a bit of a scorched taste. I've always added cold milk when making a ...


2

Although I am uncertain about Italian cookery, this operation would seem fairly unorthodox in the French repertoire. That being said, it is customary to add cream, salt pork or bacon, and flour to sauce tomate, which essentially replicates the addition of Bechamel, although it seems Escoffier deigned not to include cream in his recipe for this mother sauce. ...


2

You can store béchamel for 4-5 days safely in the refrigerator. Cool the unused portion as quickly as possible after the sauce is finished and make sure to place a piece of cling film directly in contact with the surface of the sauce prior to refrigerating it so that it doesn't form a skin and slows down oxidation. Do not freeze the sauce as it will likely ...


2

In my experience the secret to great roux sauce is to add the milk very slowly at the beginning. Keeping the hob temperature low, add a splash of milk to the butter/flour mixture, stir, and repeat. Gradually increase the amount of milk added in each turn, and soon you'll have a smooth white sauce with no lumps. When the sauce is looking more liquid than ...


2

It probably depends on how sturdy you want the foam to be. There are a number of hydrocolloids that you could use. I would start with gelatin. If you are using powdered, start with 1%. Bloom and dissolve into bechamel, bring to a boil. Pour contents into whipper (such as ISI brand), charge with N2O. Dispense as you see fit. If that produces a foam that ...



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