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38

It's perfectly safe to cook it, as long as you don't plan to eat it. The exception is if the water was at or below fridge temperature to begin with. When food temperature enters the "danger zone" of 40-140F/4-60C, there's a lag time of 2 hours before bacteria go into exponential replication. Any longer, and the bacteria counts start to increase ...


36

First, do not eat that. Regardless what color the beef is, two weeks is entirely too long to refrigerate ground beef. It is unsafe and should be thrown out. Raw ground beef only keeps in the refrigerator for 1-2 days. Ignoring storage time, regarding color, brown meat is as safe to eat as red meat. As others have indicated it is simply oxidation occurring. ...


28

I'm not going to comment on whether or not it is safe, because that could be any number of issues other than the brown coloring of the meat. However, the brown in and of itself is not an issue. When meat is exposed to air it turns a brown color. This does not effect the falvor of the meat, but the color turns a lot of people off. Grocery stores will actually ...


21

You might consider a different approach - don't fry them. Drop them (carefully) into a pot of boiling sauce instead. They come out perfectly even, very tender, and more flavourful than frying. Usually the sauce we're talking about is a sweet tomato-based sauce, but it could be anything that's reasonably thick (so that the meatballs don't just fall ...


21

From a food safety point of view, no. There is no danger, because the meat contains no pathogens after overcooking. From a "healthy living" point of view, it might be a problem, because you can have created carcinogens by charring. But we don't discuss such topics here, because nobody in the world knows how much eating charred meat contributes to the risk ...


19

How small was your onion dice? if its too big it can stop the meat sticking together, so try and make it as small as possible. did they hold together when you formed them? You might try to press the balls together as firmly as possible, as if they are not formed tightly enough this can cause them to fall apart. Be wary of adding too much egg as well as ...


19

This is total nonsense: grass fed ribeye should absolutely not be tough. Toughness is, however, affected by the cow's breed, it's age, by how stressed it was when it was slaughtered, by ageing of the meat, and I'm sure a bunch of other variables too. Something made the meat tough, but it wasn't grass feeding - the combination of strong beefy flavour and ...


18

This question is a little vague, but probably your temperature probe is lying to you, or you're not accounting for resting your meat. I would suggest a legit thermometer rather than one that gives you hints about the meat -- you'll have more control over the final product. Temperature Guide: Medium Rare Beef has an internal temp of 145F Medium Beef has an ...


18

Meat is tough for two reasons: 1- An abundance of connective tissue. 2- When over cooked. In your case I'd say you probably have both problems. Cheap meat is tough meat. It is from older animals or well worked muscle groups. This means that it has been fortified with a lot of extra connective tissue. It also means it has a lot of flavor. The solution to ...


17

Will it work without searing it first? Yes. Will it have as much flavor? No. Searing does two things: Create flavor through the browning process and jump-start cooking. Searing does not "lock in juices". The mere sound of the sizzling that goes on is indication that juices are exuding and sizzling against the hot cooking surface. Benefit of Searing ...


16

It's as safe as any other raw meat consumption. It all comes down to quality beef and best practices when handling. Two rules of thumb: Don't use steak from a supermarket. Use a butcher, preferably one you know and trust. Tell your butcher you intend to eat it raw.


16

I have heard that you can get the fattiest type, drain the grease as normal, and then rinse the meat with water in a colander to make it equivalent to the extra lean fat content. I'm not sure I buy that, and it seems this would rinse off any seasonings used also. That sounds terrible. Cooked ground beef should be drained if necessary, but not rinsed. It ...


15

| Rare | 120 to 125 degrees F | center is bright red | | Medium Rare | 130 to 135 degrees F | center is very pink | | Medium | 140 to 145 degrees F | center is light pink | | Medium Well | 150 to 155 degrees F | not pink | | Well Done | 160 degrees F and above | brown throughout |


15

The cut is important for both techniques. For sauteing, you need a lean cut - fillet, sirloin, or good rump steak. These should be cooked quickly over a high heat. As Cerberus has suggested, if you are cooking something else in the same pan, take the beef out and re-add it later; don't boil it in a sauce. Stewing beef needs some fat and cartilage which ...


14

Butchered meat is generally sterile except on its exterior. (That doesn't mean parasite- or botulism-free, but it's a start.) Get the best quality you can from a source you trust. Keep it at as low a temperature as possible, and don't expose it to warm air for more than the few minutes it takes to prepare. Cut with a clean knife on a clean surface. Put ...


14

Whether or not it's a good idea is subjective, but the Chinese seem to break that rule a lot! For example, Northeastern Chinese sweet and sour pork (guō bāo ròu) is characterized by an intense ginger flavor. The Sichuan classic twice cooked pork (huí guō ròu) calls for boiling the pork with ginger. A common condiment for beef dishes/sauces is black bean ...


13

If you are really nervous, a trick I have heard of is to start with a really thick piece of beef. Then sear it on both sides in a hot pan. At this point the outside would be deemed safe and the interior is typically safe so you cut away the cooked parts. Then proceed to make the steak tartare with the still raw inside part. As a bonus those nice browned ...


13

Generally speaking when speaking of "stew beef", the meat will break down more the longer you cook it. I often make shredded beef for tacos out of that cut by simmmering it for a few hours or more. At 1 hour, I'd say it was undercooked. For example: http://www.foodnetwork.ca/recipes/Main/Beef/recipe.html?dishid=1772 In there he recommends using stewing ...


12

Some of your 'shortcuts' are not good ideas. Definitely start with cold water. Definitely bring up the temp slowly. Definitely do not boil. Do add aromatics upfront to the broth, but remove them as they get mushy so they don't cloud it. Standard ratio for beef broth would be: 8 pounds of bones to 6 quarts of water to 1 pound of veggies (onion, leek, carrot) ...


12

The Kansas City Strip and the New York Strip refer to the same cut of meat. Apparently restaurants in New York City in the 1930's decided they couldn't sell a fancy steak named after Kansas City (where the stockyards and slaughterhouses were located). So, they just started calling it a New York Strip. If you want a steak renamed by a egotistical chef, ...


12

Several sources as Cook's Illustrated, Alton Brown, and Anita Lo practically insist that you salt steaks before cooking them. I don't think McGee experiments with or discusses exactly when to season/salt a steak in his books, but he has reportedly stated that he is also in favour of pre-salting. The fact that so many people seem to prefer this technique ...


11

I find the main reasons my meatballs fall apart are: They stick to the pan and pull apart They're not quite well combined enough. To help with the sticking to the pan, try to keep them moving in the pan until they firm up a little bit. To get them to combine better I try to keep the ratio of mince to non-mince ingredients at around 5:1 so for 500g of ...


10

Both methods are acceptable. A stock made with roasted bones is called a brown stock. A stock made from raw bones is a white stock (or sometimes just stock). Practically, it's very difficult to get a true "white" stock with beef, as opposed to chicken, since all of the impurities will darken or cloud the colour - but that is semantics. Brown stocks have ...


10

Yes, it is perfectly safe (as long as you continue to thaw the meat in a safe manner, as in the refrigerator). The marinade will not begin to have much effect until at least the outer layers of the meat are thawed, but it will not otherwise have any side effect. It may get slightly better penetration due to the changes in the texture of the meat from ice ...


9

(1) Yes, that's fine. If you use freezer bags, you don't need foil even. For longer-term frozen storage, vacuum sealed bags work better. (2) Frozen food stored at 0°F (or lower) is basically safe to eat forever. Eventually, the flavor will be affected and you won't want to eat it (but it won't make you sick). Three to four months is reasonable in ...


9

I've had great results with flank steak. Best to marinate it with a mix of salt, sugar/honey, vinegar/lemon/lime, water/whiskey/tequila/soda, olive oil, spices, and herbs for at least a few hours before grilling. More salt will help tenderize but can't be left too long at too high concentrations (search "brining"). Don't overcook it, of course, ...


9

Searing the meat has 3 advantages: Gives the meat a tasty crust. Gives you what you need to start a tasty beef gravy from what remains in the frying pan. Helps the meat hold together better during the long, slow cook. Disadvantages: Takes more preparation time. Gives you more pans to clean.


9

To get more flavor out of cumin, you can use whole seeds, and toast them briefly in a pan before grinding. If you don't want to put forth that extra effort, you'll just need to add more cumin. If it's not salty enough, the best solution is to just add more salt (sorry). Salt will enhance the other flavors as well. A bit of cornstarch would help make the ...


9

Wikipedia is correct about two things: Both the Kansas City strip and New York strip are literally the same thing as a "strip steak"; The particular cut of meat used is the short loin, and does not have any tenderloin. However, sources do not tend to agree on whether or not the strip steak includes a bone. For example: Gourmet Sleuth's Guide to Beef ...



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