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9

Marbling From my experience working in butcher shops, you want to first look for good marbling (unless you are on a low fat diet). To illustrate: I prefer personally anywhere between No. 5 and No. 8. No. 9 and up I find a bit excessive, though some people like it that way. I have had some below No. 5 and they were still good, though. Dry-aging From ...


5

That's the first thing I did with my Anova circulator. It turns chuck into ribeye! (so to speak) Notice no grey border? And the perfect medium rare?! I don't know about sous-vide cooking chuck as a roast (although I do have a recipe), because I haven't done it (yet). It turned out so great as a steak that I'll probably do at least one more as steaks ...


4

It won't. In meatballs, pork and beef will behave pretty much the same, the flavor will just be of pork or of beef. The only real difference that you're likely to see (other than flavor) is if you are substituting ground pork for beef of a lower fat content. Ground pork in the US is not generally labeled for fat content, but tends to run about 20% fat. ...


3

Let the butcher do it This is roughly the bone structure of a mammal tail: As you can see, it has very many small bones, with of course all the connective tissue. Unless you have solid knife skill, a very sharp boning knife (with the needle-like blade), a protective chain mail glove, and lots of patience, I would say something like this is better left ...


3

Two years later, the chestnut idea worked swimmingly :D I followed the recipe I linked in the question, with the following changes: Obviously, I replaced one pound of mushrooms with one pound of chestnuts. In hindsight, that was probably a bit too much, as a pound of mushrooms would have cooked down significantly more, but we didn't mind. In step 3, I ...


2

Sous vide cooking is a function of temperature and the surface area to volume ratio of the food in question. If you have a high surface area to volume the cooking time will be shorter. Steaks would have a higher ratio than the roast so they would take less time than the roast. The amount of the time difference is difficult to predict exactly over such a ...


2

You are looking for a lean cut. The reason meat "falls apart" after a long, slow cooking process is that the connective tissues and fat dissolve/gelatinize. You still risk this in any cut if the moisture level gets too high, but I've had great success with pork tenderloin in a slow cooker being still sliceable after 6-8 hours. I don't see any reason why ...


2

As stated by Logophobe below, you can of course substitute ingredients as you like. I personally find subbing beef for lamb or vice versa a bit risky though. Lamb in general has a much milder taste of itself and thus requires a sauce and other accompanyments that do not overpower the taste of the meat. In your case this could mean that the sauce will be too ...


1

Yes, yes you can. If you're adjusting cooking times, seasonings, and other factors, you can make whatever substitution you want to a recipe. Culinary purists might sneer at you but there will be no legal, regulatory, emotional, or philosophical consequences. Just don't mislabel the end product (i.e. call it a "lamb sauce" even though it's made with beef ...


1

I certainly had a very delicious Boeuf Bourguignon in Calais one cold and wintry evening. I complained that it was clearly not made with red wine and was rather pale and anaemic. The chef came out smiling all over his face. "Mais oui, monsieur, it ees my mother's own recipe. White burgundy from my home town." He showed me the bottle. It said Grand Cru on the ...



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