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10

Yes, it is perfectly safe (as long as you continue to thaw the meat in a safe manner, as in the refrigerator). The marinade will not begin to have much effect until at least the outer layers of the meat are thawed, but it will not otherwise have any side effect. It may get slightly better penetration due to the changes in the texture of the meat from ice ...


7

Flouring the beef does two things: It facilitates the development of a crust on the outside of the meat that is brown and flavorful; It contributes to the development of the sauce, as the starch will dissolve off of the meat into the sauce, where it will swell at about 180 F, helping to thicken the sauce. In this particular recipe, the flour is the only ...


7

There is no single right color for stock. The color will depend on: How deeply you have roasted the ingredients (which makes the stock more brown) before extracting the stock; and How concentrated or reduced the stock is If you have a good flavor, your stock is good.


7

Browning ingredients (both meat and vegetables including the aromatics) before doing a braise or stew (which is what slow cookers do) helps develop depth of flavor, through the Maillard reaction where proteins and carbohydrates react together to create a myriad of flavorful compounds. Vegetables that are high in sugar, such as onions or leeks, and even ...


6

Store them as you would the unground beef. If it will be still be in date after a few days, store it in the fridge, otherwise, freeze them (separating the patties with a sheet of greaseproof paper).


6

Meat in stir-fries is often velveted. That makes for a supremely soft chunk of meat, and it can be done with any type of meat. This answer actually addresses chicken: How to cook extremely soft chicken?, but it applies just as well to beef. It's usually done with egg and cornstarch, but sometimes it's done with a small amount baking soda instead, as in this ...


5

You will get the roasty, caramelized flavors; how much influence they will have on the overall flavor of your stew will depend on several factors including: How deeply you roast the them How much you add, proportionately, into the stew How strongly flavored the other items in the stew are Roasting the vegetables will also cook them, so you will want to ...


5

There is no simple, single answer to this question. It is a myth to think that you can plug the weight of a roast into a formula and get a time and temperature. You can roast at any temperature you prefer, from about 250 F to 450 F. The lower the temperature, the longer it will take to roast and the more even the doneness will be from center to edge; ...


5

There are several options: wrap jerky in paper napkins/towels before putting in the baggie put jerky in a paper bag and then in a plastic one put some uncooked rice, as Optionparty has mentioned The method you choose also depends on how long it takes the mail to be delivered. Rice is the most long-lasting way, but it will also add the most weight to the ...


5

Right now I'm thinking of draining the whole mess and making a new gravy but if there's a way to salvage what's already there I'd try it. Before you pitch it, I'd consider cooking it even longer -- we're aiming for 'ragoût' (cooked to rags), not just your typical stew. We want the vegetables to completely disintigrate, until they're more a thickener ...


5

The accepted answer from the linked question is just as accurate in this situation. Assuming you're talking about "stew meat" sized pieces (about 2cm per side or so) by the time smaller pieces brown sufficiently, they should be nearly if not completely cooked through. By similar logic, when you refrigerate them they should cool down more quickly than a ...


4

This cut would benefit from a relatively slow roast. I would thickly slice a few onions and put them in a dutch oven. Then rub the beef with mustard, salt and pepper, place on the onions, cover with a damp piece of baking parchment, put the lid on and roast at about 340F for 4 hours. The fat will render out of the meat and the onions will caramelise ...


4

Meat, especially beef, can get chewy both if cooked too short and too long. So braising it for 12 hours has made it tough. To have beef tender, I recommend using a pressure-cooker. Season the beef, put it the cooker and distribute it evenly, add a little water/stock so that beef won't burn and cook for 2-4 hours. Cooking for less time will not make it tender ...


4

Let's look at the factors you have enumerated as problems with the stew in its current state: Overcooked. By overcooked, I infer you are referring to the meat. There is essentially no way to fix this, as the cooking process is irreversible. The only thing you could do is remove the meat and start cook new meat, but that is tantamount to starting an ...


4

There is one major aspect that controls what type of cooking properties an individual cut of beef has: the amount of connective tissue. This is what groups the various cuts into two basic categories: Slow cooking cuts Slow cooking cuts have a lot of connective tissue, which means they are tough but flavorful. As a general rule (there are exceptions), ...


3

If your beef shank is chewy, it's undercooked. Period. Whatever the amount of time is, even if it seems like a lot to you, it's not enough. Overcooking will cause meat cuts with a lot of connective tissue (like shank) to dry, and even fall apart because it is too tender. But it will not still be chewy.


3

If we're talking about a solid, four pound cut of beef - the only flavor you're ever really going to get is on the exterior and just a little bit into the interior of the meat. That said, cooking in the spices/components you list still may provide liquid gold. I would simply take some of the liquid that's leftover in the slow cooker after the roast has ...


3

I just happened across this older question and found the answers provided, including the information in the link to wikipedia to be incorrect. All Prime Ribs are Standing Rib Roasts, not all Standing Rib Roasts are Prime Rib. A "Prime Rib" is a standing rib roast, from a beef that has achieved a USDA Grade of "Prime". Bone-In or Bone-out are separate ...


3

My husband also dislikes mushrooms. I substituted them for caramelized onions. Together with the pâté, it turned out quite well, though I agree that substituting the the mushrooms totally changes the character of the dish!


3

While I agree with Mando Mando's answer, I would add a couple of thoughts. First, if you use shiitakes,use dried, they have much more umami (the name of that beefy taste) when used properly. You probably will need to mix a few ingredients. While umami taste is activated by glutamate (found in high levels in fresh shiitakes, soy sauce, tomatoes, kombu kelp, ...


3

Roasting your veggies will give a "richer" and somewhat sweeter flavor to your stew. As mentioned in another answer, your cooking times are reduced by pre-roasting. Also, it's been my experience that pre-roasting or deeply browning your meat will Vastly improve your stews!


3

I am not aware of any rigorous tests done on a sequence like you propose. In the absence of data, I simply assume holding any open cooked product more than a week in the refrigerator is risky, smoke notwithstanding. You can significantly boost your safety by soaking your brisket for at least 24 hours in an acidic salt bath -- perhaps with some brown ...


3

Sure. You want to grind the cueritos with leaner meat to make a higher fat ground meat? There is no reason that wouldn't work. You might find it necessary to remove the very outer skin, but I'd try a small batch without taking that step. The grinding might eliminate any textural problems (or it might not, so try a little bit first).


3

It's fairly common for beef to turn a little brown in places due to oxidation - myoglobin, which is what makes meat red (and is what people often mistake for blood in a rare steak) oxidises to form metmyoglobin, which is brown. If you followed good storage practices (it hasn't been out at room temperature for more than 2 hours), and it has no odd odour or ...


3

When meat is first cut, it is purplish in color. If it is exposed to enough oxygen, it can turn a bright red. Eventually it will turn brown. If the meat is cut and exposed to air, but then deprived of enough oxygen to turn red, the color will go from purplish directly to brownish. (See this USDA FAQ, which was also quoted in the answer to a similar ...


3

In addition to @Jolenealaska's answer the beef is cut across the grain, and very thin. It also helps to start with a tender cut like sirloin or rib.


2

160°F is the internal temperature. You don't need to worry about it. To cook it, you do this normally till the internal temperature is 160°F. What I do is use the skillet to brown my meat all the way, use a wooden ladle or spatula to break it into smaller pieces, drain the oil, add sauce and herbs and spices, let simmer, cool and server. Personal note: ...


2

I confess I'm not familiar with the term entrecôte, but looking it up, its pretty clear this is a already-tender cut. So you don't need to tenderize it. In fact, you probably don't want to tenderize it—at some point, it'll go from tender to mushy. Unfortunately, from frozen, at least according to the Baldwin tables, you'd need over five hours. If you ...


2

It depends on whether the temperature stayed under 40 F / 4 C the whole time, and even if it did, how long was it above 32 F / 0 C. If: Yes, the temperature never rose above refrigerator levels of 40 F / 4C, and The duration that it was above 32 F / 0 C (above freezing) was not more than the length of time you would normally refrigerate an item (2-3 days ...


2

I believe that you have what's commonly known as a rib eye. It comes from the same primal as the prime rib roast (or standing rib roast). Rib eye steaks are also known as rib steaks, delmonicos, scotch filets, etc. They can be found bone in or boneless and with the fat caps trimmed or not. It sounds to me like you have a bone in rib eye that hasn't had the ...



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