Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

Yes, it is perfectly safe (as long as you continue to thaw the meat in a safe manner, as in the refrigerator). The marinade will not begin to have much effect until at least the outer layers of the meat are thawed, but it will not otherwise have any side effect. It may get slightly better penetration due to the changes in the texture of the meat from ice ...


7

Flouring the beef does two things: It facilitates the development of a crust on the outside of the meat that is brown and flavorful; It contributes to the development of the sauce, as the starch will dissolve off of the meat into the sauce, where it will swell at about 180 F, helping to thicken the sauce. In this particular recipe, the flour is the only ...


7

There is no single right color for stock. The color will depend on: How deeply you have roasted the ingredients (which makes the stock more brown) before extracting the stock; and How concentrated or reduced the stock is If you have a good flavor, your stock is good.


6

The simplest way to see the difference is to compare the cut diagrams: British French Images courtesy of Wikipedia The main difference is in how certain areas are sub-divided. We can see that faux-filet is part of the British sirloin, and entrecote is partly forerib and partly sirloin.


6

Yes, a simmer will be on the order of 180 to 200 F (82 - 93 C) which is a safe temperature for cooking and holding stew. Browning beef does cook it, but usually not all the way through as that is not the point; instead it is to develop the flavors. The full cooking is done during the braising or stewing stage while you simmer it. This also allows the ...


6

Cooks Illustrated has an ultimate veggie burger recipe that you can adapt. Their key to umami is cremini mushrooms. I've made that recipe and it was well received. Of course, no one mistook them for real hamburgers, but the patties tasted quite good. MSG (monosodium glutamate) is to umami flavour what sugar is to sweet flavour. So if you're pro-msg, you ...


6

Browning ingredients (both meat and vegetables including the aromatics) before doing a braise or stew (which is what slow cookers do) helps develop depth of flavor, through the Maillard reaction where proteins and carbohydrates react together to create a myriad of flavorful compounds. Vegetables that are high in sugar, such as onions or leeks, and even ...


5

Meat, especially beef, can get chewy both if cooked too short and too long. So braising it for 12 hours has made it tough. To have beef tender, I recommend using a pressure-cooker. Season the beef, put it the cooker and distribute it evenly, add a little water/stock so that beef won't burn and cook for 2-4 hours. Cooking for less time will not make it tender ...


5

There is no simple, single answer to this question. It is a myth to think that you can plug the weight of a roast into a formula and get a time and temperature. You can roast at any temperature you prefer, from about 250 F to 450 F. The lower the temperature, the longer it will take to roast and the more even the doneness will be from center to edge; ...


5

There are several options: wrap jerky in paper napkins/towels before putting in the baggie put jerky in a paper bag and then in a plastic one put some uncooked rice, as Optionparty has mentioned The method you choose also depends on how long it takes the mail to be delivered. Rice is the most long-lasting way, but it will also add the most weight to the ...


5

You will get the roasty, caramelized flavors; how much influence they will have on the overall flavor of your stew will depend on several factors including: How deeply you roast the them How much you add, proportionately, into the stew How strongly flavored the other items in the stew are Roasting the vegetables will also cook them, so you will want to ...


4

This cut would benefit from a relatively slow roast. I would thickly slice a few onions and put them in a dutch oven. Then rub the beef with mustard, salt and pepper, place on the onions, cover with a damp piece of baking parchment, put the lid on and roast at about 340F for 4 hours. The fat will render out of the meat and the onions will caramelise ...


3

If we're talking about a solid, four pound cut of beef - the only flavor you're ever really going to get is on the exterior and just a little bit into the interior of the meat. That said, cooking in the spices/components you list still may provide liquid gold. I would simply take some of the liquid that's leftover in the slow cooker after the roast has ...


3

There's no real right or wrong answer here, it's totally subjective as I have no idea what you'd consider "too peppery". I like pepper so too peppery for me is a lot, whereas some of my family can't tolerate any heat, so too peppery is basically the merest hint. I'll try and scale it for you depending on how much heat tolerance you (or your guests) will ...


3

While I agree with Mando Mando's answer, I would add a couple of thoughts. First, if you use shiitakes,use dried, they have much more umami (the name of that beefy taste) when used properly. You probably will need to mix a few ingredients. While umami taste is activated by glutamate (found in high levels in fresh shiitakes, soy sauce, tomatoes, kombu kelp, ...


3

I hate mushrooms too. The only time I ever made wellington, I simply put a mixture of onions and bacon and cheese in place of the mushroom layer. I first sprinkled parmesan cheese. Then I put a layer of finely chopped sauteed onions and then crumpled cooked bacon. It was fantastic and everyone there said it was the 'best thing they ever ate'. I realize this ...


3

I just happened across this older question and found the answers provided, including the information in the link to wikipedia to be incorrect. All Prime Ribs are Standing Rib Roasts, not all Standing Rib Roasts are Prime Rib. A "Prime Rib" is a standing rib roast, from a beef that has achieved a USDA Grade of "Prime". Bone-In or Bone-out are separate ...


2

Arm roast is part of the chuck, and so is a cut suited for low and slow techniques that create tenderness by converting collagen into gelatin such as: Braising Slow barbecue Slow roasting Some folks also find that it makes very good ground beef or hamburger which of course mechanically disrupts the connective tissue. Since braising is one of the best ...


2

With a strongly-flavored sauce, you won't mind the meat not having much flavor. The protein value of the meat is still intact, so it is worth using it up to stretch the family food budget. Curries are a good use for soup meat, and as Sobachatina said, pot pie. I make a thick onion gravy as a pot pie base and that makes even the most tasteless soup meat go ...


2

160°F is the internal temperature. You don't need to worry about it. To cook it, you do this normally till the internal temperature is 160°F. What I do is use the skillet to brown my meat all the way, use a wooden ladle or spatula to break it into smaller pieces, drain the oil, add sauce and herbs and spices, let simmer, cool and server. Personal note: ...


2

A filet is any boneless cut of meat (it's a generic term); usually one of higher quality. You could have a filet, for instance, off the strip loin (a manhattan filet). Typically, however, when someone says "filet", they're referring to the "filet mignon" (literally "small boneless cut of meat"), which is a cut from the front end of a beef tenderloin, a ...


2

I live in Bordeaux but used to live in Texas. Here is my "modus operandi" when I need a specific piece of meat like the brisket. I show my butcher a diagram and show him the part I need. The usual term for brisket is "poitrine" I ask him to cut a piece of 5 kilos and to leave the fat on the top of it. He knows me now and always tell me when he has a entire ...


2

I confess I'm not familiar with the term entrecôte, but looking it up, its pretty clear this is a already-tender cut. So you don't need to tenderize it. In fact, you probably don't want to tenderize it—at some point, it'll go from tender to mushy. Unfortunately, from frozen, at least according to the Baldwin tables, you'd need over five hours. If you ...


2

Oxtail would be your most likely substitute, but you have indicated you cannot obtain it. The next best choice (of those widely available) is probably chuck, which is the shoulder muscle, and is well worked and flavored. It requires low and slow cooking for best results, much like shanks and tail do. Some stores—even the chain grocery ...


2

I believe that you have what's commonly known as a rib eye. It comes from the same primal as the prime rib roast (or standing rib roast). Rib eye steaks are also known as rib steaks, delmonicos, scotch filets, etc. They can be found bone in or boneless and with the fat caps trimmed or not. It sounds to me like you have a bone in rib eye that hasn't had the ...


2

It depends on whether the temperature stayed under 40 F / 4 C the whole time, and even if it did, how long was it above 32 F / 0 C. If: Yes, the temperature never rose above refrigerator levels of 40 F / 4C, and The duration that it was above 32 F / 0 C (above freezing) was not more than the length of time you would normally refrigerate an item (2-3 days ...


1

Surveying the top search results for sous vide prime rib, the consensus appears to be about 7 hours, with some leeway on either side. Cooking Sous vide - 5-10 hours at 137 C. Big Wayner BBQ - 7 hours at 135 C. Modernist Cuisine - 5-10 hours at 137 C. Cave Man Keto - 10 hours at 136.5 C Sous Vide Recipes - range of temperatures depending on desired ...


1

Leg bones, the femur esp, as said have most readily available marrow, and some butchers will slice these in half rather than cross section to make scooping out marrow easy. Whether you have much marrow or more actual bone matrix can depend on how close to the end of that bone you're getting. But pretty typically get a femur and you're rocking. If you think ...


1

If your beef shank is chewy, it's undercooked. Period. Whatever the amount of time is, even if it seems like a lot to you, it's not enough. Overcooking will cause meat cuts with a lot of connective tissue (like shank) to dry, and even fall apart because it is too tender. But it will not still be chewy.


1

I believe the cattle you're referring to are Japanese Waygu - there are a number of breeds under this rubric, but there are notable points: Genetic predisposition to exceptional marbling and tenderness The animals are hand-massaged by the farmer, due to insufficient space for the cattle to wander freely Grain fed rather than grass fed, as the cattle is ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible