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10

Do you know what cut of Kobe beef you had in Japan? Assuming budget is not an issue, your best bet will be to find the same cut in a Kobe Style or Wagyu beef. This is available in Canada. Get the same cut as whatever you had in Wagyu beef. If you have no idea what cut it was, I'd probably start with a ribeye. It's one of the better, more popular cuts (also ...


9

The problem with you stating Kobe beef is its not a cut of meat. Kobe beef comes from certain cattle raised in Japan. In Canada your best bet will be to find the best quality beef you can. Depending on preference I'd suggest sirloin for a good all rounder, rib eye if you don't mind the extra fat (my favourite cut) or fillet steak if you want the most tender ...


9

Hello @Huangism and welcome to Seasoned Advice. You may consider domestic wagyu. To get the best, it will still be pricey, but not nearly as much as Kobe. Please see this excerpt from Lobel's of New York . You Get What You Pay For All Wagyu beef is not created equal. In Japan, Kobe beef sells at more than $300 per pound. But now Wagyu is starting ...


9

Marbling From my experience working in butcher shops, you want to first look for good marbling (unless you are on a low fat diet). To illustrate: I prefer personally anywhere between No. 5 and No. 8. No. 9 and up I find a bit excessive, though some people like it that way. I have had some below No. 5 and they were still good, though. Dry-aging From ...


7

Meat in stir-fries is often velveted. That makes for a supremely soft chunk of meat, and it can be done with any type of meat. This answer actually addresses chicken: How to cook extremely soft chicken?, but it applies just as well to beef. It's usually done with egg and cornstarch, but sometimes it's done with a small amount baking soda instead, as in this ...


6

Store them as you would the unground beef. If it will be still be in date after a few days, store it in the fridge, otherwise, freeze them (separating the patties with a sheet of greaseproof paper).


6

What ever it is, sounds like sinew or other hard tissue, it's done it's purpose now the flavour, sugars, geletine etc is now in your broth and you should probably discard them. I don't imagine they will taste of anything now and the texture is likely to be vile. By all means taste a bit to see what I mean. It won't make you ill though you may possibly ...


6

Either you've insulated it or your fridge is really cold. I suggest using a thermometer to check your fridge temperature. Parts of your fridge may be at slightly different temperatures than other parts; it may help to move it to a warmer part of the fridge (if that can be done safely, you don't want it dripping on your produce, for example). You could use ...


6

They are not equivalent cuts and 'should not' be used interchangeably. Stir Fry meat is cut from the more tender cuts of beef (tri-tip, sirloin, rib-eye) and don't require much time cooking to be 'ready to eat'. Stew Beef is from less tender cuts (the Chuck or Eye of Round) which will become tender after a 'significant' time braising (cooking in liquid). ...


5

The accepted answer from the linked question is just as accurate in this situation. Assuming you're talking about "stew meat" sized pieces (about 2cm per side or so) by the time smaller pieces brown sufficiently, they should be nearly if not completely cooked through. By similar logic, when you refrigerate them they should cool down more quickly than a ...


5

Your best choices would be top sirloin (#1 choice), tenderloin, or one of the other (less expensive) sirloin cuts. Those cuts will be tender, flavorful, and without pockets of fat or gristle to mar the appearance of your dish. I don't recommend round because I simply don't like its flavor. Using round in this application might be one of the best ...


5

That's the first thing I did with my Anova circulator. It turns chuck into ribeye! (so to speak) Notice no grey border? And the perfect medium rare?! I don't know about sous-vide cooking chuck as a roast (although I do have a recipe), because I haven't done it (yet). It turned out so great as a steak that I'll probably do at least one more as steaks ...


5

First of all: this is the first time I've seen anyone ask to recreate hospital food... I'm happy your dad didn't have the same experience most people do with hospital food. One technique that can give meat that tender is velveting the meat. This is a Chinese cooking technique where the meat is marinated in egg white, wine and corn starch before cooking. ...


5

One possibility is that the meat was cooked in a crock pot. This would make sense on a few levels. First, since it is a hospital and presumably they have a large amount of people to feed, cooking multiple steaks in a large crock pot at once would save time and still produce quality food. Second, cooking the meat slowly in a crock pot (or in liquid) over ...


4

Try cooking on low instead of warm (or at a higher temperature, maybe 185-195F, with your fancy crock pot), and make sure you really got good stew meat. I would expect the beef to have been reasonably tender after that long if it were the right kind of cut - certainly not inedibly tough, even if it weren't all the way done due to the lower temperature. But ...


4

Tough beef becomes tender because the connective tissue breaks down into gelatine in the presence of heat and moisture. This can be sped up considerably using a pressure cooker, so that's your solution. There are considerations to this: a pressure cooker that could take 15 lbs of skirt steak all at once would be very large, hard to handle, and possibly ...


4

I will shamelessly steal @Jolenealaska's thunder and recommend velveting your meat as a means to protect against overcooking. This is a great method to bring meats just up to temperature, and is a very traditional preparation for stir-frys. Should work nicely with your Hunan Beef.


4

It won't. In meatballs, pork and beef will behave pretty much the same, the flavor will just be of pork or of beef. The only real difference that you're likely to see (other than flavor) is if you are substituting ground pork for beef of a lower fat content. Ground pork in the US is not generally labeled for fat content, but tends to run about 20% fat. ...


3

A blade steak is cut from the Chuck. It will have a great deal of connective tissue, so it is an appropriate cut of meat for slow-ish smoking. I would recommend about 250-275F (121-135C) as a cooking temperature. It should take about 2 hours, give or take, depending on the thickness of your steaks. Hit them up with some dry rub or salt and pepper prior to ...


3

Marinading should help a great deal, especially a good long marinade. The only other thing you can do is make sure not to overcook the beef. Cutting against the grain doesn't guarantee tenderness any more than any other method will, it just helps, so don't worry too much.


3

In addition to @Jolenealaska's answer the beef is cut across the grain, and very thin. It also helps to start with a tender cut like sirloin or rib.


3

When meat is first cut, it is purplish in color. If it is exposed to enough oxygen, it can turn a bright red. Eventually it will turn brown. If the meat is cut and exposed to air, but then deprived of enough oxygen to turn red, the color will go from purplish directly to brownish. (See this USDA FAQ, which was also quoted in the answer to a similar ...


3

It's fairly common for beef to turn a little brown in places due to oxidation - myoglobin, which is what makes meat red (and is what people often mistake for blood in a rare steak) oxidises to form metmyoglobin, which is brown. If you followed good storage practices (it hasn't been out at room temperature for more than 2 hours), and it has no odd odour or ...


3

Two years later, the chestnut idea worked swimmingly :D I followed the recipe I linked in the question, with the following changes: Obviously, I replaced one pound of mushrooms with one pound of chestnuts. In hindsight, that was probably a bit too much, as a pound of mushrooms would have cooked down significantly more, but we didn't mind. In step 3, I ...


3

I waterbath can my tallow in jars for 10 minutes. I found a really good scientific explanation once saying why it was ok to can it this way but I can't find it now. Basically for fat to go rancid or for bacterial / mold to grow there has to be certain conditions met such as moisture, air, etc. Because rendered fat has no moisture, if done correctly, then ...


3

Let the butcher do it This is roughly the bone structure of a mammal tail: As you can see, it has very many small bones, with of course all the connective tissue. Unless you have solid knife skill, a very sharp boning knife (with the needle-like blade), a protective chain mail glove, and lots of patience, I would say something like this is better left ...


3

What you describe sounds a lot like swiss steak, in which you use cube steak (an inexpensive cut that's been mechanically tenderized). You sear the cube steak, then slow cook it in a flavorful sauce until it's extremely tender.


2

I live in Kansas City. I am a professional caterer, BBQ judge and food consultant. There is ZERO difference. They are exactly the same cut of meat. A steak cut from the short loin. They were universally called "Kansas City strips" until Delmonico's restaurant in NYC decided some time in the 30's to call it a "New York strip" on their menu. That is all ...


2

Wegmans sells it as top round, already sliced and in vacuum sealed packages. Wegmans is a high end, regional grocery store in the eastern US. They carry products you can't find in regular stores. I buy 8-10 packs at a time and freeze, I'm ready to make rouladen at any time. price just went up to $7.99 a lb, but if you've ever had boogered up rouladen meat, ...


2

Milanesa cut works great! That's what I used tonight.



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