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25

When you buy a burger from a fast food restaurant you are buying a product that has been engineered to provide absolute consistency, be very fast to cook, and be as cheap as possible so it can be offered at a low price for a reasonable profit. The grill marks are engineered in, and they are given coatings which will give the right appearance when cooked. ...


4

Beef for Slow cooking methods: When shopping for beef that will be cooked long and slow, price per pound within a grade will be a helpful guide. Less tender cuts that will be best cooked long with liquid will be much less expensive than the naturally tender cuts that require less cooking i.e. filet mignon. From http://life.familyeducation.com/ When ...


4

That sounds like a beef Pirog, a Russian (and other surrounding areas) pie with meat (or other fillings) wrapped in pastry or dough and baked. There are also smaller stuffed pastries/breads called "pirozhki" in Russian (literally: little pies) that may be baked or fried. Polish pierogi are small filled dumplings. Similar in concept and pronunciation to ...


4

When I worked at a Japanese restaurant in Seattle years ago they would freeze the beef and then use a meat slicer to cut it really thin, then roll it up. It's possible there is a newer device i'm unaware of that does it automatically but it is a fairly simple process.


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If it's not completely frozen, then it will last roughly as long as meat stored in the fridge. So if "recently" was within the last 4-5 days, it's fine. If "recently" is more than a week ago, it should not be eaten.


3

Marinating steak - apart from very acidic marinades - will affect only the outer few mm of your meat. While these are the first to freeze, they are also the first to thaw, together with the marinade. Your total marinating time will be (time until outer layer is frozen) + (time since outer layer thawed, before cooking) Unless you flash-froze your meat ...


3

According to the USDA, these names are branding only. The USDA defines steaks of the loin with a few names. Legally, either steak can be from any of the final four of these, but traditionally, both are from the final two. Loin, Porterhouse Steak Loin, T-Bone Steak Loin, Strip Loin Steak, Bone-In Loin, Strip Loin Steak, Center Cut, Bone-In Loin, Strip ...


3

There isn't a way to predict this. Non stick pans are produced in different quality and can be anywhere from "water pearls off the surface" to "as bad as enamel". And all of them lose their non stick properties over time, at wildly different rates depending on quality and usage patterns. If you want to know it for your case, you'll have to try it. Worst ...


3

According to Serious Eats, a 210 gram steak in sitting in a 21° C room managed to go from 3° C to 10° C... in 2 hours. For a larger steak going up all the way to 21 degrees, it would take longer. The take-away from that article is that it's not worth it and does not affect the resulting steak.


3

If your sous vide machine is cooking to the right temperature then your steak is not overdone. That's the beauty of the process, your meat will go up to the temperature you set and no higher. You need to take the temperature of the center of the meat when you take it out. If the temperature of the meat is higher than you set the machine to then something is ...


3

Per this link from MSU; heifer carcasses had slightly more marbling than steer carcasses, but USDA quality grade was not significantly different. So not enough of a quality / taste difference to bother with... live heifers averaged $149.80 and steers averaged $149.70 per hundredweight Apparently, heifers (female) are more expensive than ...


2

I bought a cross cut bone in approx 1" thick beef shank because it looked like a good piece of meat, I had never heard of it before. I read online about it tending to be very tough if not cooked properly. Sprinkled on onion and garlic powder and meat tenderizer with a little salt. I braised it on both sides, put onions in the bottom of a 2 qt crock pot then ...


2

Find a good Asian food market. They should sell small jars, tins, or liquid in sachets of soup flavours. I find the jars most convenient. About a teaspoon per serving is plenty, store in the fridge after opening. Some of the liquid in sachets can be the most authentic for the Asian style, but for just a beefy broth, one of the jars will do fine. If you ...


2

My first guess was "oxidation". Googling that I found a lot of results. Here is one blurb about 'Meat Flavor Deterioration': MFD is initiated during processing procedures such as grinding, cutting, freezing, tumbling, massaging, and/or cooking. Iron liberated from meat pigments catalyzes oxidative degradation of highly unsaturated lean tissue ...


2

Short answer: Buy a cheap hunk of beef that looks like it has characteristics you like (e.g., lots of fat vs. little fat). Cook slowly. Enjoy. I don't think there's a single answer to this question. It all depends on the texture, flavor, and amount of fat you want, as well as what you're willing to pay. The last consideration of cost is generally the ...


2

Of course there's no guaranty that you will get sick - there almost never is - this doesn't mean you should ignore food safety. There are three large factors that influence how "safe" your meat is: How much harmfull microorganisms were in your meat to begin with? How much did these microorganisms multiply and more importantly metabolize? How "healthy" are ...


2

I usually let a steak sit out for 45 minutes to an hour before cooking it. But the real answer is to get a meat thermometer, preferably an instant-read digital one, and use that to not only tell you when your steak is at room temp, but also to tell you when it's done cooking.


2

By definition, Boeuf Bourguignon contains wine. However, non-alcoholic wine can work just fine. Bacon and cream are optional. You can tweak the recipes to make the final product exceptional.


1

Just my own opinion but I think if the cuts are made across the grain rather than with the grain it should be fine. With the grain might be tough to chew. There are 2 camps on cutting jerky meats so it really depends on how it was cut.


1

If the goal is to melt collagen, couldn't that be done just as easily at a higher temp? No, it won't be. The reaction which has to happen to the collagen doesn't go quicker when the temperature is higher. You have to get it to 68 Celsius and wait for it to happen. If it is at more than 68 Celsius, it won't happen quicker, or better, or anything. You ...


1

What kind of frying does the recipe call for? Stir-fry? Deep-fry? Anyway, your best bet when trying to make something crispy is to dip it in tempura and then deep fry it, but stir-frying on a high heat will probably give good results as well. Substituting sliced-steak for minced meat will change the texture, but you can try to avoid disintegration by ...


1

Try browning the ground beef first in a pan (no oil). Dump out on paper towels to absorb the grease. Use onions and other aromatic vegetables at this step if you like, too. Then stir fry the other ingredients, and add the beef to the stir-fry towards the very end of cooking. Have you ever browned hamburger meat (or whatever texture is the minced meat you ...


1

To make the seasoning, you'll need to experiment. You'll need at least some of those chemicals, but you can probably find them with friendlier, less chemically-sounding, names. Looking at the ingredients list, I'd guess that the key ingredients in that list, flavour-wise, are probably Monosodium Glutamate, Yeast Extract, Onion Powder, Garlic Powder, Tomato ...


1

Some breeds are more tender. Aging beef for at least 2 weeks allows the protease enzyme naturally present in beef to relax rigor mortis. The way the beef is chilled initially can cause something called "cold shortening" in which protein fibers contract, and so are more chewy. The amount of exercise that the animal gets during life affects the toughness of ...


1

Form the patties and place in a nonstick pan. Once you have got all your patties in the pan (make sure they are thin) cook all the way them at 250F in the oven (make sure you watch them). Let them cool then place them in Ziploc bags. Freeze them. The night before work place them in bottom fridge to start thawing. On your way to work it will be still frozen (...


1

I think a microwaved, reheated burger is probably not going to compare favorably to a freshly-cooked burger. With that said, I think the main thing for the pre-cooking is that it would need to be start off a little undercooked, otherwise the heating process is going to result in it being overcooked (since you're saying you're looking for some pink in the ...


1

You can of course try to thaw it in your microwave (if you have one) or in your regular oven on low heat. However, I've never had any problems cooking with frozen ground beef. Just cook it on fairly low-medium heat and scrape off the outer layers as they get thawed. This might be easier and take a shorter amount of time if you manage to split it into smaller ...


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Being a hospital, where food safety is even more important than otherwise, I'd imagine they step away from the more elaborate methods of tenderizing meat. The first thing I thought of was the industrial version of slow cooking. The may have used something like this Alto Shaam cook and hold oven: Manufacturer touts: Halo Heat tenderizes even the ...


1

Maybe the meat was made with transglutaminase, a clotting agent that has the ability to bind protein-containing foods together. As I understand it, the results are very tender, often being served as filet. This from http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/weird-news/you-eating-fake-steak-customers-5856558 I have been served some very questionable filet, soft, mushy, ...


1

Same exact cut of meat. I used to work in a meat market. There is zero difference, other than New Yorkers thinking it's "their" steak, when the specific cut originated in Kansas City.



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