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1

Here are some tips: Use a thicker cut of steak... A 6 oz NY Strip tends to be a very thin steak. You probably want at least a 10oz NY Strip if you plan on searing. If you are concerned about portion size, get a nice thick 12 oz NY Strip and cut it in half after cooking and you will have two nice thick 6 oz steaks suitable for post-sous-vide searing. Get ...


1

The risk you have is that if you do not inhibit bacteria growths not only can spoilage occur but mold can grow as well. The Biltong I make is hung for 10 - 14 days. That is a long while for micro organism to have there way with your meat. You must take precautions This is very scary as unless you have a laboratory at hand you are playing the proverbial ...


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I've been using the same fish grease for 5 years....my mother did the same for even longer...and so did my grandmother who just turned 92. We're all in great health, no prescriptions. So skip all the talk, I'm living proof you can reuse over and over again.


0

There are several methods recommended by USDA (US Department of Agriculture) and curing with salt is NOT the best one, so you can totally go without it and have a SAFER result than curing and not do the treatments recommended in the following articles. Please see here: ...


1

I would allow 2-3 days total time to realize the full beauty of this beef cut. And I'm jealous of you, they know this cut in France. We call it beef shank in the U.S. and it's not easy to find. The bone and marrow are what make it taste so good. And I can tell you that I know Mexican cooks who make this into glorious dishes like Caldo de Res, and some of ...


3

Welcome! Braising would be the preferred cooking method for that cut of beef. The long, slow cook will result in falling apart, tender, moist meat. Because of the name of the cut, the first thing that comes to mind is beef bourguignon. From Wikipedia : It is a stew prepared with beef braised in red wine, traditionally red Burgundy, and beef broth, ...


0

A roast is too large for a marinade to penetrate to reduce it to a paste. That being said, the outside would be definitely very soft if you leave it in long enough. A thin slice of beef will illustrate this effect better, as it would break down to very small chunks.


5

130 degrees is certainly the temperature to aim for, I'm thinking that it's the pan sear that did it. 1 minute in a pan is actually quite a bit for a thinner steak (at 6 ounces I'm thinking yours were maybe 1/2 - 3/4 inch), certainly enough to add 10-20 degrees or so to the steak's temperature and make it medium well. As for how to avoid it there's a few ...


6

Pineapple contains Bromelain, which is "one of the most popular proteases to use for meat tenderizing." Since it's sold as a meat tenderizer, I'd say it really just depends on how long you marinate with it -- it's possible to over-tenderize something. This warns about over marinating, and mentions recommended times: The same process that tenderizes ...



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