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KC is a NY with partial bone and small strip of fat for flavor. You can still find hi scale aged steakhouse restaurants that sell both cuts. Its that simple. However, if your KC or NY strip is not served as part of a Porterhouse, you're just 'doing it wrong' anyway. ;) ..and always eat the filet first when its fresh out of kitchen. ENJOY!


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Do it! Marsala is sweet, brine is salty. You may be on to something here... Really though, I always brine anything I roast or sous-vide. No issues here. EDIT: I would recommend using olive oil instead of butter if you are still worried. Not to mention Marsala + olive is delicious.


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Try a self basting lid? My cast iron lids all have self basting bumps on them. This lets the water and oil that's splattered up drip back down on the food rather than running off to the sides.


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Cooking it on the stovetop means that the top of the item can be significantly cooler than the bottom. When you consider that liquids can carry more thermal energy than air, this can result in a signficant problems when cooking. I'd recommend at least one of the following: Use a tight-fitting lid, so that there's a signficant amount of steam trapped in ...


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Throw it away. It could be safe, especially if you thoroughly cook it as that will kill any parasites and break down any toxins present. However, even if may not hurt you it's probably going to taste pretty awful.


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"For the same time" seems to be your problem here. An oven will warm a pot much more slowly than a stovetop, especially a heavy iron stew pot. You'll need to monitor your temperature, and only count the time after it reaches 68 Celsius. The warming up phase can be easily close to an hour in the stove, eating away a lot of the actual cooking time.


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Looks like the differences in the temperature gradient is causing the change in the results. The simmering on the stove top is caused by the liquid on the bottom of the pot converting to gas and bubbling through the rest of the liquid into the cooler air, only some of which is trapped under the pots lid. So you have convection within the liquid braising the ...


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I do think there is a maximum to the duration of stewing a cut of beef. There is in my opinion such a thing as too tender and soft. If you plan to cook the meat as one large chunk you will have to add a little to your normal stewing time, but I would not go as high as 15 hours. Cooking and re-heating is quite an interesting option though, as quite a few ...


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What you describe sounds a lot like swiss steak, in which you use cube steak (an inexpensive cut that's been mechanically tenderized). You sear the cube steak, then slow cook it in a flavorful sauce until it's extremely tender.


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This is my recipe for a sublimely tender roast: Grab a large chuck roast or brisket. Start in the evening by smoking or roasting the meat at 225 F until an internal temp of ~150-160 F is reached. Place the meat inside of a covered roaster on a metal rack (important) then place in the oven at a rendering temp (say 170 F) overnight and all day until you get ...


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One possibility is that the meat was cooked in a crock pot. This would make sense on a few levels. First, since it is a hospital and presumably they have a large amount of people to feed, cooking multiple steaks in a large crock pot at once would save time and still produce quality food. Second, cooking the meat slowly in a crock pot (or in liquid) over ...


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First of all: this is the first time I've seen anyone ask to recreate hospital food... I'm happy your dad didn't have the same experience most people do with hospital food. One technique that can give meat that tender is velveting the meat. This is a Chinese cooking technique where the meat is marinated in egg white, wine and corn starch before cooking. ...



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