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52

Use a salted ice-water bath. The water increases the contact and heat dissipation, and adding salt allows the temperature to go below freezing.


16

It's the points/levels in the duty imposed that have made UK beer weak, from a historic point of view. Over 4% and you are on to a higher tariff point for the duty paid on it, so brewers aimed at 3.9x% for a long time, although there have been changes, and a lot of brewers find that people are prepared to pay a few pennies extra for a stronger brew these ...


15

Beer Can Chicken has a few tricks to have it turn out amazing as opposed to just average. I always take my thawed chicken and rub it all over inside and out with vegetable oil and pureed garlic (about one large clove). Then I coat the skin with seasonings like salt, pepper, seasoned salt or chicken/poultry seasoning like sage or an \Italian mix; you can use ...


14

Yes. Keep in mind though, that strong / bitter flavors may become unbearably strong / bitter in a reduction. That said, I use beer in sauces, marinades, as a braising liquid, mixed with broth in risotto, and as lubrication for the cook. I have a fridge full of steak and Sam Adams. Can I turn this into something amazing? Marinate the steaks in beer for ...


14

Beer, like wine or coffee, is often used when a reduction over a long cooking time is called for but water would be sub-optimal. I make chili a lot. Water is not your friend there, especially if you incorporate a lot of elements that have water in them to begin with (undried/roasted tomatoes in particular). Beer doesn't add the acidity that coffee does, but ...


14

I think the reason is the strong pub culture in Britain. The idea is you go to a pub, hang out, have some food, and generally spend an afternoon or evening socializing with your mates. For that purpose, a beer that is lower in alcohol is ideal, since you can sip numerous pints over the course of the evening without becoming drunk to a socially unacceptable ...


12

I can think of several reasons why you might salt beer: Salt is a natural flavor enhancer, so you'd be able to taste the hops and malt more Salt reduces perceived bitterness, so overly hopped beer would taste less bitter The salt crystals may nucleate bubble formation, giving the beer more head (briefly) I've heard of it being done before, but never with ...


12

I add beer to my chili and simply let it simmer with the lid off for an hour or two so the liquid evaporates. I've never had a problem with overcooking.


12

As noted above, reducing the liquid through evaporation will thicken up the chili but you run the risk of burning/scorching the bottom and it can take a long time at lower temperatures. What I like to do is to take some of the beans (I prefer black beans in mine) and mash them up into a thick paste and then stir that into the chili. The starches from the ...


12

N2O is more stable than CO2. Mixing N2O with water or cream won't create diffetent molecules. If the liquid you add N2O is not very thick (as water) the gas and liquid will separate in two. If it is thick, as with cream, the gas will get trapped in it. You can see the proccess with more detail in this question. CO2 reacts with water (H2O) making H2CO3 ...


11

In my experience beer can chicken usually allows you to cook the chicken until the skin is much crispier than you would normally be able to without drying out the entire chicken. The beer is in the cavity keeping the chicken moist. I can see how a rotisserie would mimic many of these qualities, and even a well-done roasting technique can do great things ...


11

Indeed, Mr. Zable actually applied for a patent -- US application no. 0014320, filed Sept 13, 2010. (Of course, just because he applied doesn't mean the US Patent Office will issue a patent on it.) His process is, in essence: (1) gelling a liquid beverage; and (2) wraping an aliquot of the gel in a raw "farinaceous dough", selected from the group of ...


10

I use beer a LOT for my cooking. As the others have said, you need to watch out for the bitterness, which can intensify when you cook and reduce it down. As such, I often cook with different beers than I drink. You can use the IBU (International Bitterness Unit) rating for a beer to get an idea of whether your favorite beer will be a problem. Personally, I ...


9

My main concern (would have been) BPA, as most cans nowadays are coated with BPA plastics inside to protect flavor. Cooks Illustrated evaluated the BPA leeched into chicken using this method: Beer can interiors are coated with an epoxy that contains Bisphenol A (BPA). Is the popular method of cooking a chicken perched on an open beer can really a ...


9

I'm not sure if its dangerous, but if you are worried about the can you can get various tools, designed to cook a chicken like this.


9

The mythbusters actually did this one once, and their conclusion was that the best and easiest way was indeed to simply add some salt to the water.


8

Using a paper towel, wrap it around the bottle 2 or 3 times Gently wet the paper towel. You want it to be damp, but not soaking. Enough so that the paper sticks to the bottle, but not dripping. Place in the freezer for 5 - 7 mins. I've used this for chilling wine and long necks.


8

I've used dark beer with good results. It just depends on what flavor you desire. I often use Lion stout, for example, which imparts a strong, intense flavor and color, which I quite like, but it would not be appropriate for all applications. Also Sierra Nevada porter has happily found its way into my bread. Keep in mind that these beers may be too ...


7

Beer in sauces or marinades works best if it's flat. Carbonation generally doesn't do anything good for a sauce. Beer also works well with any of the following additions: Worcestershire sauce Mustard (preferably dry) Hot peppers (or hot pepper sauce) Honey (or, as we do it in Canada, maple syrup) Garlic and/or ginger (surprisingly) If you want more of ...


7

Beer pairing dinners in my area seem to be on the rise as more craft beer-centric establishments show up. This may not be true across the world, but I see this practice becoming increasingly common. BeerAdvocate, a noted resource amongst all the beer fanatics I know, has a guide to pairing and another specific guide for pairing with cheese. Epicurious, ...


7

http://beeradvocate.com/beer/101/ has a vast amount of information on beer styles. To answer your specific question, an ale is top-fermenting whereas a lager is bottom-fermenting. Lagers are generally fermented at lower temperatures than ales. I believe that lambics would constitute a third category, since they are traditionally fermented by wild yeasts, ...


7

When a recipe includes wine as an ingredient, it's often also only specified whether the wine should be red or white, or occasionally what region the wine should be from, but seldom a particular wine from a particular winery. This allows for as much variation in flavour as just saying "add beer". On the other hand, I have seen quite a few Belgian recipes ...


7

Beef broth would be what I would go with if I had to substitute beer in chili. While obviously not the same, it still has a rich flavor that should hold up well.


7

As other answers have noted, salt enhances flavor and reduces perceived bitterness. It also increases the perceived body/mouthfeel of the beer. My grandfather always salted his cantaloupe and honeydew melons. I tried it, and was pleasantly surprised by how it intensified the melon flavor. Also of note is Gose, a style of beer brewed in Leipzig, Germany. It ...


7

I use instant Corn Masa Flour as thickener. It seems to hold onto water better over time than does corn meal. That's likely because unlike corn meal, it's precooked, nixtamalized. Either way, you'll get a bit of a corny taste.


7

Cans have a lot of advantages over bottles: they don't allow light in (light spoils beer), are easier to stack (and take up less space when arranged tightly), the materials for each can are cheaper, and so on. From the consumer perspective, this results in cheaper and higher-quality beer, all else being equal. The reason craft breweries have been using ...


7

It will produce the same effect, however it might alter the taste (depending on the type of beer), and will almost certainly alter the color of the final product, as beer contains sugars that will increase browning.


6

No, you're not crazy. You have good taste. The reason for drinking darker beer like stouts and porters is for the flavor. If they are over-chilled, you lose most of that flavor. Don't obsess over it, but in general a lot of people serve dark beer too cold. That said, you should drink your beer at whatever temperature makes you happy. There is nothing ...


6

Since most are pre-cooked (in US Supermarkets anyway), and you are just re-heating, your (still tasty) options are pretty limited with respect to beer brats From the perspective of UW Madison (self-proclaimed "Brat Capital of the World"): Simmer in beer first, then grill. For more info here is a post regarding prep; this method would definitely be the ...



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