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6

You can use it as a base for risotto if you like the flavor. It will make lovely pink rice.


5

Generally, raw beetroot shouldn't become soft. The thing is that there are differing definitions of soft. If it is soft like a tomato is, then it has probably spoiled. If, on the other hand, it is still firm but has little "give" to it, then it's probably alright to eat. It is the cooking that softens it up, though it can be eaten raw. I grate some raw ...


4

I think it is mostly for the taste. It certainly isn't necessary - I roast beets without any vinegar all the time, and they turn out great. I just roast them in their skins, without any oil or anything added. It takes a long time, over an hour depending on how big they are. When they are completely tender, let 'em cool, and the jacket slips right off. ...


4

Basically you boil them or roast them until tender, then let them cool and peel them. It is better not to cut or peel them before cooking, they will bleed lots of color and flavor. Some classic things to do with them: puree into a soup called borscht, slice them in a salad (particularly nice with goat cheese), serve as a roasted vegetable like you would a ...


4

It's a vegetable. When you cooked it you damaged the cell walls and the juice is leaking out. I think this picture only seems unusual because of the beets' color. If these were carrots there wouldn't be a question because, of course, the juice would be less startling. If these beets haven't started to mold or ferment- and you'd know it from the smell- then ...


4

It's no accident that, as Ray says, people treat beet greens similar to chard (swiss chard - also known as silverbeet in some regions!). According to On Food and Cooking, they're the same species, Beta vulgaris. Chards are varieties that have been selected for thick, large leaves, subspecies cicla. The same passage also mentions that beets are a distant ...


4

The leaves are often referred to as "beet greens", which might return some more search results. I usually see them treated similar to spinach or swiss chard; that is, either served raw in a salad, or blanched and/or sauteed, perhaps with some garlic and olive oil.


4

The trick that works for me consistently is to put the beets in a sealed container while still hot and let them cool down that way, they continue to cook a bit and the steam from them keeps the skins loose. Also, peel them while they are still warm, if they cool too much the skins may adhere again.


3

From a scientific standpoint they are not closely related. They aren't even in the same order. Beets are order Caryophyllales and Turnips are order Brassicales.


3

Blanch them first to remove the skin, then roast them. This method works for tomatoes as well. Here's an example from ForkBytes Blockquote Bring a pot of water to a boil. Add the beets and blanch briefly, until skins are loose, 3 to 5 minutes. Remove the beets and immediately plunge them into a bowl of ice water. Peel and cut into bite-sized pieces. ...


3

The recipe's goal is to use the natural bacteria in the beets and beet peels to cause the fermentation. The thing about using natural bacteria is that you never know what these are going to be, so it's a crapshoot what flavors you are going to get. Beets produced in one farm may have radically different bacteria in them, different varieties grown in the same ...


3

Root vegetables are known for staying edible many months when stored in the right conditions: cool and humid. Traditionally this was a root cellar under the house that stayed above freezing in winter, yet cool in summer. Your refrigerator veggie drawer is made to do the same thing. The veggies you see in supermarket have been kept that way for transport and ...


3

The best use for beet stock--the water you boiled fresh beets in--is to drink it. Make sure, of course, you wash the beets before boiling so your stock is free of unwanted icky stuff. Beet stock is just one of the four ways you can use fresh beets. First, cut off the stalks and then cut the leaves off the stocks. The stalks, boiled or sauteed, can be eaten ...


3

I treat the beet as three different items - the root, the stem, and the leaves. I generally use the stems and leaves at the same time, but I cook them differently. Unlike ruby chard, the stems keep their glorious colour when they're cooked, making them something I like to add to lots of dishes for contrast. So in soup, for example, you can saute the stems ...


2

I like them steamed: Steam , unpeeled, for around 35 minutes depending on size. Use paper towel to rub off the peel after it's cooked, and then slice. They're very likely to stain your nice towels, clothing, and counter-tops .... a cutting board is recommended.


2

That's the first I've ever heard of roasting beets in vinegar. Acids will intensify the color of anthocyanins which are the red, purple, and blue pigments in foods. For instance, sauteed red cabbage will end up a blah blue color unless you incorporate some acid (red wine, vinegar, etc.) and then it will brighten right up to a bright red/purple color. ...


2

The only use I know for beet water is in pickling things. For example, traditionally pickled turnips served with Lebanese food are colored with beet juice in the pickling brine. I don't have a recipe for it, but you can probably search one out.


2

Use a carrot cake recipe, which will be adapted for the moisture, but reduce the sugar a little because beets are sweeter than carrots. You get a fantastic purple colour. A lavender icing would be really interesting with it, I think.


2

Beetroots do have an earthy smell, that's normal and can get stronger if you just cook them in water. I can think of two approaches to work with this: Try roasting them in an oven (optional: wrapped in some aluminum foil) until tender. They will develop a sweetness whith perhaps some earthy undertones. Add an acidic component like vinager or lemon juice ...


1

Beet stock (the cooking liquor left over after boiling beetroot) contains plenty of nutrients, and hence it's a good breeding ground for mould and bacteria. I would treat it like cooked vegetables, and throw it on the compost heap (or down the drain) if not consumed after a week in the fridge. Of course it could be preserved for longer if steps were taken ...


1

While the sous vide method will give you a very easy to use environment for great results with minimal effort, it requires expensive equipment. I have invested 70 Euro worth of materials, many hours pushing bits in ugly C code, and one 220-volts accident, and mine is not ready yet :( Commercial ones are much more expensive, and frequently out of stock. But ...


1

If you are handy with electrics and electronics, linking a heating element to a PID controller is probably your best bet for stability. This will give you quite stable temperatures. You can find many sets of instructions by googling homemade sous vide pid,which is a very similar application, although higher temperature ranges are usually the goal.


1

I haven't tried baking with beets yet, but, as you said, it must be a bit like carrot cake. To keep my carrot cake from going soggy while baking (carrots giving off steam), I mix them first with the recipe's sugar to weep them. This also pulls out flavour from the carrot to the cake batter. With beets, the procedure could be called bleeding rather than ...


1

I've eaten beats that had a similar appearance with no ill effects. Let your nose tell you, as BaffledCook mentions, "if it smells like a beet", eat it.


1

Salt is quite effective at neutralizing bitter flavors, which is why some folks experiment with using low levels of it in coffee. For beets, go ahead and salt them a bit more aggressively than you normally would and see if that salvages the flavor for you. Here are a couple of references: http://tierneylab.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/01/07/salt-trumps-bitter/ ...


1

Roasting caramelizes the natural sugars in vegetables and, eventually, burns them. Roasted anything that turns out bitter is almost always the symptom of overcooking. Sometimes it also means that your ingredients were spoiled or "off" in the first place. As for saving them - there's not much you can do in either case, other than trying to mask it with ...


1

My Russian Flatmate inspired me to try 'beetroot chocolate cake'. The beetroot keeps the cake really moist but without the need to use much butter/oil. It's really healthy and tastes very rich and moist, almost similar to chocolate browny. I made two of them in the last couple of weeks and will make another one tomorrow. As per recipe, I tend to change mine ...


1

Vinegar does a couple of things. Taste, obviously, which is a good reason when cooking. The acidic nature of the vinegar does have additional effects - the acid will 'cook' your beet somewhat as well. Specifically about beets: well, they have an earthy, sweetish flavor, often. The vinegar can complement this nicely. Thinly sliced beet (carpaccio) in ...



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