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10

I love using a pastry cutter, something like this: It does the best job cutting butter or shortening into flour. Every now and again while using it I use a fork or butter knife to remove the big blockages.


7

They are probably unsalvageable, sorry. There are two possibilities for the bad taste. If you didn't have much fat in the dough, then what you are getting is probably an alkali taste. It is bland and subtly bitter. Alkali (basic) stuff can be neutralized with acid. But for the neutralization you need to mix your alkalic stuff with acid in a liquid ...


7

I used to use a pastry cutter, but it was hard work and a pain in the butt clearing the blockages. So I switched to using a food processor. It's so much quicker, and providing you cut the cold butter into 1x5cm sticks, it yields perfect results with just a few pulses.


6

I usually use my hands, working on soft butter chopping small pieces with my fingers.


6

It is highly likely those biscuits benefited from the skills of a food stylist. They will have used any number of techniques to ensure the biscuits look as good as possible for the photo, possibly including some that would render them poor tasting or even inedible. Among the things they might have done are: Controlling the lighting to put the biscuits at ...


5

The 'ridges' are created by the biscuit cutter, browning may or may not be aided by an egg wash, but given the short bake time, I doubt it, if your biscuits don't brown evenly, rotate the pan 180° after 4 minutes. (that said, yes, those in the picture are almost certainly props...)


5

I would think you'd be able to. I'd look for recipes on camping websites for baked goods in dutch ovens, as it'd be pretty similar. You should be able to pull off biscuits and brown bread pretty easily. And I'd tell you about cakes cooked on campfires such as upside-down cakes, but you're the one who asked about it earlier.


4

Since you ask about other tools, I recommend avoiding the mixer altogether and instead grate frozen butter into the flour. If you have a food processor you can use the coarsest grating blade--chilling the bowl and grater first will help keep the butter cold will help--but it goes quickly by hand with a coarse grater. The key is to get the butter distributed ...


3

The paddle should be used for this. You'll want to do it on a lower speed, probably no higher than 2 or 3. You'll have problems with the flour flying up before you have trouble with the butter melting. It will also help to chop the butter up some before putting it in.


3

I seem to recall that in Moroccan cities there are often 'neighbourhood' ovens where you pay a small amount to have your bread baked, because few people have their own ovens. You cut a distinctive design in the loaf so you can tell which is yours when you go back to collect it; the whole system is extremely ancient. The ovens are usually wood-fired clay ...


3

The recipe is fine; if you follow it carefully it should work. Things you might mess up: Baking powder isn't baking soda; make sure you have baking powder. If you leave the dough alone for hours before baking, the baking powder will expend itself. It's silly, but make sure you used a tablespoon of baking powder, not a teaspoon. Working the dough longer ...


2

Part of the problem is that whole wheat flour goes rancid pretty quickly after it's milled (I believe it's from the natural oils in the germ). The usual advice is that whole wheat flour has a shelf life of six months or so, much less than white flour. If you're using old flour, try getting fresher stuff. If you're willing to go through extra effort, ...


2

Much of the bitter taste in whole wheat products is a result of the hard red wheat used. In the last few years more companies like Bob's Red Mill, King Arthur Flours, and other have started distributing whole version of hard white wheat. A simple way to reduce the bitter flavor without decreasing the overall nutritional benefit of eat whole grain bread is ...


2

Baking times are never exact, as there can be considerable variance in the product and environment. The three most likely variables to affect total necessary baking time are: How thick the biscuits were rolled How moist they dough was Actual oven temperature accuracy For this reason, there is normally a test or indicator for doneness. The best possible ...


2

You need to make sure you use the right measurements when translating recipes from the US to the UK as the UK uses imperial measurements which are different from US measurements. There are also differences in cream fat content and egg sizes. Teaspoons and tablespoons are the same, so don't worry about them. First, pint measurements, as the UK doesn't use ...


2

Dice the butter and use the paddle attachment, as sourd'oh recommended. The paddle will break up the butter some, but more importantly will 'squish' the pieces, making them thinner and flatter. That will layer the butter through your pastry, making it flaky. This is similar to the effect of coarsely grating the butter, but will create a good shape and mix ...


2

Biscuits are notorious for that; they're best eaten right away. If you want to preserve their original texture longer than 12 hours (yes, that short of a time), your best bet is to freeze them as soon as they are cool and eat them within a month or two. Wrap them as air-tightly as possible. You can pop the frozen biscuits in a moderate oven or unwrap and ...


1

I bake only whole wheat bread was disappointed with the lack of wheat flavor. After experimenting I find that the best way to develop the rich flavor is to use only a very small amount of yeast but let it rise cool and slow - using the freshest flour that I can get from my food co-op (that takes care of the bitterness) For a 4 large loaf batch I'll make up ...


1

Well, I have to go against what sourd'oh said, I like the whisk attachment for cutting in butter. I have owned two kitchen aid's in the past and they both had nice solid whisks with thick wires that worked great for cutting in the butter. And to go with the heat theory that uval mentioned, a whisk has much smaller surface area hitting the butter and so is ...


1

One, cut up your butter into small cubes, then freeze it on a plate. The colder you keep the butter the better the result. Then, if you have one, use a food processor to cut the butter into the flour. I don't have one, so I use a cutter, then finish it with my fingertips. If I feel the butter is getting too warm I'll put the bowl in the freezer for a few ...


1

I'm in the middle of class (school), and I don't have a ton of time to type anything out, so I'll point you in this direction: http://www.thekitchn.com/thekitchn/food-science/leaveners-fats-the-science-of-great-biscuits-109416 Should help, covers the science. The answer will be found, plus more!



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