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17

"Shocking" the food stops the cooking process, preventing the food from losing its color and texture.


12

To prevent the vegetable from going 'off' in the freezer. From answers.com: Blanching is the scalding of vegetables in boiling water or steam. Blanching slows or stops the action of enzymes. Up until harvest time, enzymes cause vegetables to grow and mature. If vegetables are not blanched, or blanching is not long enough, the enzymes ...


11

Both involve boiling water, but there are a number of differences: blanching has two meanings -- it's mainly used when talking about setting (or enhancing) the color of vegetables, with minimal cooking (only the outermost layer is cooked). As such, it's typically only a few seconds to a minute dip in already boiling water, followed by a shock (dip in ice ...


6

My guess is that you dropped 2lb of carrots into the water. This drops the water temperature under the boiling-simmering point. So, you're not blanching correctly. You should have taken about 3/4lb portions and blanched them successively. (Or you should have used more water on a bigger stove top.)


6

You're missing an important step here: You need to use cold water immediately after the boiling water in order to halt the cooking process. Boil them for about 1 minute, then drain. (You can pour boiling water over them, as in the case of almonds - it doesn't really matter how you do this.) Submerge or rinse in cold water, to prevent any further cooking ...


6

I don't think it is really possible to name exact times. It depends on the age and toughness of the particular batch of vegetables, how thick they are and how you've cut them. The way I do this is to make my initial judgement based on color change, and then start poking at them with a cake tester every 30 seconds or so until they reach the perfect degree of ...


5

Blanching is done to halt enzymatic action that would start to destroy the plant cells. You can freeze without blanching and the veggies will still be edible even after 6 months but their quality will decline faster. If you are planning on juicing those veggies within a month then you are going to be doing a lot more damage than the freezer will and I don't ...


4

The part about blanching that is important is that the vegetables are briefly cooked and then immediately doused in cold water to stop the cooking process. Processors use boiling water as it is easier to manage and you can put flavorings and other additives (preservatives, color enhancers, etc) to the water to get the effect desired. There's no reason you ...


4

Once you blanch garlic it needs to be treated as cooked, so if you don't want to pickle it then your options are to refrigerate it or freeze it.


3

My copy of The New Food Lover's Companion (which I have found to be an indispensable reference for a huge number of culinary terms) reads as follows: Pages 488-89: parboil To partially cook food by boiling it briefly in water. Page 68: blanch To plunge food (usually vegetables and fruits) into boiling water briefly, then into cold water to stop ...


3

35% by weight is extremely optimistic considering that an average potato is 75% water (according to a number of internet sources). If you don't peel the potatoes and they're 100% usable (no bruising, no black spots) really 25% is the best you can hope for in potato weight. Obviously, you want as little of the final weight as possible to be oil, both because ...


3

The problem with throwing something in boiling water is that it's still hot when you take it out. The big lesson is that whenever you cook something with heat, even when the oven/stove/grill/pot/water is turned off the food is still being cooked. This is why when cooking meat it's a good policy to assume that it will rise a few degrees during resting. The ...


3

Here's a few lists: http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles/kovach59.html http://www.ochef.com/617.htm http://www.gardenersnet.com/recipes/blanchingvegetables.htm


2

I can't say which things are actually used, but this would seem to confirm my above guess, along with the other one - you can use more chemicals in industry than you would in a home. Product and process of blanching nuts A product and process of removing the skins from nuts involves wetting the nut kernels with an alkaline solution and then with a ...


2

Have you considered taking an hour or two and juicing all your vegetables at the same time? Put them in separate containers like they type you would get Chinese soup in? In essence you’re doing the same thing, but in a different order without the blanching, sugaring or extra work. The plastic they use for Chinese food freezes without splitting, and then ...


1

I don't think this will be such a good solution. You can try it, but it probably won't do what you want. First, there is the problem of temperature control. In blanching, it is critically important that your vegetables heat up quickly, and then cool down just as quickly. If you insulate them with a plastic bag, you are building a thermal delay into the ...


1

In addition to previous answers: As 'Shocking' the food will cause a marked temperature difference between the outer layer of the food and the inside, you can use the difference in expansion/contraction for a useful effect. (re: boiled egg and removing the shell). Also consider corn on the cob. By dropping the outside temperature, the cob will be easier to ...



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