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14

I use Propane all the time. There are several factors as to why: It is cheap, about 1/4 the price of butane. It’s more readily available. You can buy a propane torch at many different stores for very cheap. The torches typically put out a lot more heat. I’ve used both propane and butane, mostly for crème brulee, but other food as well. The butane ...


9

Propane and butane are pure alkanes. They don't produce anything nasty when burned. The worst you could possibly get should be carbon monoxide (and I am not even sure it can be produced in a torch, the dioxide ifs much more likely), but it being a gas, it won't stick to your food. The complex molecules you get from heating the food itself have more potential ...


5

You will achieve the exact same results and save yourself considerable money getting your propane torch at the local hardware store. That said, depending on what you are attempting (Crème brûlée, for instance) may take some practice to get it right, but a generic propane soldering torch is fine.


5

I agree with Nick's answer and also use a propane torch. I'll add, don't get a "cooking" torch (i.e. one designed specifically for the kitchen). They're expensive, have a smaller flame, and use a small gas container. It would be a huge pain to try and use for something large (like flank steak, a sous vide favorite). Instead, get a plumbers torch at Home ...


4

The technique for creating a proper layer of melted sugar on your creme brulee involves three important elements: After you add the sugar, gently swirl the ramekin to create smooth layer of sugar. You don't want it too clump or be uneven. Gently 'kiss' the sugar with the tip of the flame, moving the flame around to heat evenly, just until the sugar starts ...


2

Yes, you will be just fine food safety wise. The Bernzomatic heads available with the triggers are best for convenience. I actually recommend you look for MAP/MAPP gas which will lessen your risk of "torch-taste" but as was mentioned earlier the food safety issue is not a problem, it's the same propane that your grill uses. A few tips, always start your ...


1

Rapeseed oil (aka canola for those across the pond) has a high burning point, but it can still start on fire using a blowtorch. If you are using just a bit of oil in a non-stick pan then there's not much fuel to burn, however if it flames it will probably go quick and the flames will go pretty high. It's unlikely to start your kitchen on fire, but you could ...


1

A few tips follow that may apply in your case: Before baking the brulees, use the torch on any bubbles formed in the liquid custard so that uneven patches don't become baked-in. Use fine grained (caster) sugar so that any unmelted crystals will be less noticeable. Swirl the sugar around in the ramekin and then get rid of excess sugar by tossing it onto a ...


1

I haven't noticed any real difference with or without oil or fat to be honest. When searing in a pan, the oil would simply aid heat transfer from the pan to the meat by eliminating insulting air pockets. However, I have experimented a little with brushing a weak glucose syrup onto steak before torching, and believe (without scientific measurements) that ...



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