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15

I use Propane all the time. There are several factors as to why: It is cheap, about 1/4 the price of butane. It’s more readily available. You can buy a propane torch at many different stores for very cheap. The torches typically put out a lot more heat. I’ve used both propane and butane, mostly for crème brulee, but other food as well. The butane ...


11

Propane and butane are pure alkanes. They don't produce anything nasty when burned. The worst you could possibly get should be carbon monoxide (and I am not even sure it can be produced in a torch, the dioxide ifs much more likely), but it being a gas, it won't stick to your food. The complex molecules you get from heating the food itself have more potential ...


10

To be honest I wouldn't have thought the top would get soggy. I've also made hundreds of brûlées for wedding parties in the past and the top has never gone soft. Unless you're putting them in the fridge between colorizing and serving? That will definitely cause problems. If you are actually getting a soggy top it means one of two things: You've not ...


6

You will achieve the exact same results and save yourself considerable money getting your propane torch at the local hardware store. That said, depending on what you are attempting (Crème brûlée, for instance) may take some practice to get it right, but a generic propane soldering torch is fine.


6

I agree with Nick's answer and also use a propane torch. I'll add, don't get a "cooking" torch (i.e. one designed specifically for the kitchen). They're expensive, have a smaller flame, and use a small gas container. It would be a huge pain to try and use for something large (like flank steak, a sous vide favorite). Instead, get a plumbers torch at Home ...


5

The technique for creating a proper layer of melted sugar on your creme brulee involves three important elements: After you add the sugar, gently swirl the ramekin to create smooth layer of sugar. You don't want it too clump or be uneven. Gently 'kiss' the sugar with the tip of the flame, moving the flame around to heat evenly, just until the sugar starts ...


4

Just before the party, sprinkle some granulated sugar on top. Use a blowtorch (preferred) or a very hot broiler to "brulee" the new sugar. That will cause both the old and new sugar to get browned and crunchy. I just saw this on a related question. Alton Brown on Creme Brulee. He shows great blowtorch technique, do it just like that and you'll be fine, no ...


4

I own one, and have tried it for both those uses, but with mediocre results compared to other techniques. For crème brûlée, I get more even caramelization by placing the individual custards under a broiler. The only benefit I could appreciate from using the torch was that it was quicker, and I could monitor the caramelization more easily. (The broiler ...


3

Different cultures have creme brulee with hard or soft tops. I like them crackable Make the toffee/caramel tops separately some hours earlier, and store in an airtight container When ready to serve. Line up all the creme's. Have one person carefully placing the tops, while a second person uses the largest torch you have to just blast the middle to cause ...


3

I admit, I have a hardware-grade torch, that I also use for plumbing, but it does have some culinary-related uses besides what's been mentioned: Starting the grill. For charcoal, or for those times on the propane grill when the sparker's not working and you don't want to take the time to re-gap it. Planting your garden. You can burn holes in weed-block ...


3

I would say probably not, with a few exceptions. I have one and the only thing I really use it for that you couldn't do some other way is crème brûlée. You can blacken the skin of a pepper with some tongs and a gas burner. Of course, if your stove is electric, then the torch suddenly becomes much more useful. The thing I use mine for a lot is browning meat ...


3

I have not noticed any real difference from using a fat, so I skip it. What does make a difference is thorough drying the meat. I haven't ever had great results from a torch though. I prefer a screaming hot pan or grill, although both are way more effort.


3

The simple answer is that propane cylinders should be stored outside. That's what every guide will tell you. You really shouldn't even be storing it in a garage. Your yard is the best place, and if you take the safety guidelines seriously, you probably shouldn't own a propane torch if you don't have an "outside" (i.e. you live in an apartment). Either that ...


3

Yes, you will be just fine food safety wise. The Bernzomatic heads available with the triggers are best for convenience. I actually recommend you look for MAP/MAPP gas which will lessen your risk of "torch-taste" but as was mentioned earlier the food safety issue is not a problem, it's the same propane that your grill uses. A few tips, always start your ...


2

A few tips follow that may apply in your case: Before baking the brulees, use the torch on any bubbles formed in the liquid custard so that uneven patches don't become baked-in. Use fine grained (caster) sugar so that any unmelted crystals will be less noticeable. Swirl the sugar around in the ramekin and then get rid of excess sugar by tossing it onto a ...


1

Most recommendations about storing propane tanks outside are assuming you're storing quite a large amount of it (eg, 20lb tanks for a grill). Odds are a hand-torch has a 1-lb tank or smaller, which isn't quite as much of a problem, as be less likely to reach the concentrations to be explosive. (that's not to say it wouldn't be flamible ... just not ...


1

Most aerosol cans contain a reasonable propane or some other cheap hydrocarbon gas as the propellant. Many household have a cupboard full of them The build quality of a disposable aerosol can is much lower than a propane cylinder, and they regularly leak, but how many household explosions/fires have been reported to be caused by them, basically none Most ...


1

Rapeseed oil (aka canola for those across the pond) has a high burning point, but it can still start on fire using a blowtorch. If you are using just a bit of oil in a non-stick pan then there's not much fuel to burn, however if it flames it will probably go quick and the flames will go pretty high. It's unlikely to start your kitchen on fire, but you could ...


1

I tried MAPP gas and got a sooty residue. Not recommended. I have used propane, esp. when melting cheese, with great results.


1

I haven't noticed any real difference with or without oil or fat to be honest. When searing in a pan, the oil would simply aid heat transfer from the pan to the meat by eliminating insulting air pockets. However, I have experimented a little with brushing a weak glucose syrup onto steak before torching, and believe (without scientific measurements) that ...


1

Check out this discussion here: http://forum.chefsteps.com/discussion/13/mapp-gas-vs-propane-torches#latest For sous-vide cooking your going to want the hottest flame you can get (and are comfortable with). Those tiny creme brulee torches are cute but your food will be cold by the time you put a decent sear on it (trust me i've tried). Most people go with a ...



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