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10

Trust your nose. But I suspect they will be long dead - fermented/rotted


7

While you could probably do dried blueberries in a VERY low oven (150F), you'll most likely need to prop the door open slightly to allow moisture to escape. You'd be best to do them in an actual food dehydrator which will have a fan to expell the moisture being released from the food. Keep in mind however that if dried as they are, they will shrivel up ...


6

When it's plump, and happily jumps off when lightly tickled. :-) Seriously, you can put a container under the berries and whichever ones easily fall off (with gentle encouragement) are the right ones to get. If you had to really pull them off, then they're not ready yet.


6

In the case of most bush berries (blueberries, raspberries, blackberries) depth of color and ease of picking are the most indicative signs of ripeness. The berries that are on the sunniest side of the bushes will ripen first. The greater more sun exposure they receive the quicker they ripen, thus the reason that a grouping of berries even in one area will ...


6

That's the same method I would use. If you have a salad spinner you could try giving them a gentle spin in there first. They are sturdy enough (unless they're over-ripe) that they should handle a gentle pass through it.


6

The antioxidants in blueberries lie in the berries themselves, not in the pesticides residing on their skin. Washing them before freezing means that water freezes on the outside. The water crystals puncture the skins of the berries, changing the texture.


5

The story is more complicated than SAJ tells it. Blueberries, like many other purple foods, are colored by a pigment called anthocyanin. It changes its color from red at very low pH to real blue at very high pH. At the blueberry's natural pH, the color is a purple with more red than blue in it. What you can do is to juice some blueberries separately, then ...


5

you could try some other thickeners, like xanthan gum, tapioca starch, arrowroot, or the like. not certain of the proportions, though, but i'm betting google knows.


5

Were your blueberries grainy? I occasionally get a pint that have a grainy texture. I've heard that this means they aren't quite fresh, but they usually taste just fine despite the texture. I'm not sure if this particular graininess translates to a jam though. Jam can also get grainy from sugar that isn't fully dissolved. This can happen more easily with ...


4

Graininess caused by excess undissolved sugar is fairly obvious. The grains will be sweet and will dissolve on the tongue. Alternatively, with some fruit including blueberries, the skins of the fruit can be dry or tough and stay in grainy fragments in the jam. Again, this is obvious. The individual shreds will be dark and flat, etc. Another, in my opinion, ...


4

There are many causes for the jam being grainy, but most commonly, as @hobodave suggested, is due to inadequate dissolution of sugar. The test is simple. Get some jam into a bowl, add a little bit of water, stir, does it resolve the problem? If yes, then it is a dissolution problem. There, you may want to change the method of making that jam -- if your ...


4

Store them unwashed. Take out any "bad" ones. I've had decent luck adding some paper towels to wick away extra moisture that seems to speed up the spoilage. Martha Stewart suggest going even further and spreading them out on paper towels on a sheet pan. I have no idea who keeps a fridge empty enough that they can store full sheet pans in there, though. I've ...


4

Blueberries, and especially underripe blueberries, have a lot of pectin. Blueberries have about .4g per 100g compared to apples which have .5g. As you suspected this is almost definitely causing the problem. Many blueberry jam recipes consist of just heating pureed blueberries with sugar and acid- no added pectin needed. When you heated your pureed ...


3

Blueberries, despite the name, are purple, not blue. The appearance of being bluish in color is due to iridescence, not pigment. While you certainly could color the batter purple by pureeing some of the blueberries into it, it won't be blue. Think about the color or stain near the berries blueberry muffins you have eaten—it is a rich purple, not ...


3

When I was a kid, we picked tons of blueberries. We had a frame made out of 1" x 4" boards, 2'+ wide and about 4' to 5' long. At the far end, the frame was angled towards the middle (narrow side) with a space for the berries to drop into a bucket placed below (maybe 4" to 6"). On the bottom of the frame we had metal window screen stapled down (no cloth ...


3

What I do is use a big plastic bowl. The bowl is about 18" in diameter at the top and holds about 2 gallons of water. I fill the bowl about 1/2 to 2/3 full of blueberries and then fill it to the brim with water and leave the water running into it. As the bowl is filling and when it's full I gently agitate the berries with my hands. Most of the chaff ...


3

Most fruits, a few days: Use kitchen towel to dry them (don't wash) Line a sheet pan with kitchen towel Spread them so they don't touch (any mold on one berry won't spread) Refrigate Fragile berries: Put the pan in an inflated plastic bag (so the bag doesn't touch the berries) If you see any mold on some berries, you can delay mold formation on ...


3

Common names of plants are a very unclear matter. There are big differences not only between languages, but also regional differences within a single language. There are lots of (closely related) plants which are sold under the name blueberry. And probably not even the person who grew (or gathered) them can tell you the exact species. While it does matter ...


2

In my experience, if they come off the branch easily, they're good. If you have to exercise force to pick them, you're usually in for a bunch of sourness.


2

I generally see this kind of sweet pairing with game, like venison. This coming from the vegetarian, but I can't really think of anything vegetarian I would do with it. (Or give it as a gift :).


2

I bet it would be delicious with beef. Beef and berries are great together. Other ideas I just thought of -- use it like you would use jalapeno jelly -- to top baked brie or in a sandwich or spread with cream cheese.


2

I have found that when drying fruit, is can sometimes help to maintain the texture by sun drying them, however, bugs can get in them unless you put them in a container where moisture can get out, sunlight in and bugs cannot go in.


2

i'll also just add that, from my own experience (last week!) making blueberry jam, the blueberries i bought are exactly as you describe (what i think of as a common, ordinary blueberry), and during the cooking process the jam turned into the dark blue color i expected.


2

Other than the thickeners mentioned above, sometimes I prefer the taste of cooked flour or oats to corn starch. Oats will leave everything moderately translucent if you use whole uncooked oats or will cloud the pie like flour (but solidify more) if you use quick oats. Another touchy option that won't effect flavor: pectin. Pectin is naturally contained in ...


2

A couple simple, practical things to go with Sobachatina's suggestions: First, you can break up the gel with a serious blender, not just a whisk. If it gets liquid really flowing, it'll disintegrate pretty well. Even easier, though: just don't chill it, at least not that much. What exactly you can get away with depends on your ice cream maker, the ...


2

Jam is fruit, sugar, and pectin. You added more fruit but all that liquid in the fruit wasn't gelled with the pectin and sugar. You could try adding sugar and heating the jam to get the pectin to gel with the new juice. This could work but is likely to be error prone. Pectin gelling is tricky and it might not re-gel. I would recommend adding some sugar, ...


2

What you describe are definitely symptoms of coagulating protein. Not all proteins in quark are coagulated, else it wouldn't be creamy but rubbery like mozzarella (actually, more like cottage cheese, because it would still be grainy). My first guess is that the blueberry acid curdles the protein. Blueberries are also known to act a bit strangely due to ...


1

Puree a few of the berries, say 1/4 cup, before adding to the batter. That shouldn't be enough liquid to mess up the recipe badly. Work quickly once you've got the puree in though, blueberries are acid enough (pH about 3.1) to start your leavening agent working immediately. That'll mean flat muffins if you don't pop them in a hot oven fast.


1

I've had really good results with special "breathable" plastic bags designed to let ethylene gas escape. The ones I'm using now are made by PEAKfresh USA. These work particularly well with strawberries. Apparently some retailers are catching on and prolonging produce shelf-life through ethylene absorption.


1

BBQ Grilled Peaches: halve and pit peaches, brush with BBQ sauce and grill. Either use your Blueberry Hot Sauce in the BBQ sauce or brush on after grilling. Top with some fresh blueberries and chopped basil.



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