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1

If you want water that was as pure as possible, and your contamination consists of solids or dissolved salts, you need to distill it - if that yields great taste is another matter, and using distilled water as a drink is the topic of a health controversy (would be safe for cooking in any case). If the contamination is of dissolved gasses or hydrocarbons ...


1

By definition, precipitates fall to the bottom of the container. Therefore, the standard procedure is simply to decant the liquid -- pour the liquid off the top, without pouring out the last little bit which contains the solids.


1

I would simply filter them out. A coffee filter should take care of even the finest minerals. I doubt that you can effectively do it while boiling. Even if you give them sites to attach to, a lot will stay afloat.


0

If you like bland and stringy fast, parboil them. If you like flavorful,tender, melt in your mouth ribs, never parboil the ribs.


0

My second generation Italian American mother always made her tomato "gravy" & added raw meatballs to that sauce. The result is a perfectly round meat ball, moist & full of flavor. She soaked any grease from the meat (in the sauce) up with thinly sliced potatoes floated on top for about 1/2 hr. My dad ate the potatoes as a snack!


1

You can also boil eggs by adding them to boiling water and starting the timer at that point. We usually do about 6 minutes for soft boiled eggs and 11 or 12 for hard boiled eggs. Remove them from the heat and rinse with cold water immediately to stop residual cooking. But you'd need to tell the eggs apart, soft from hard. You could separate them by color ...


5

You can do that by using a different method which puts eggs in boiling water. Bring water to a boil in a large enough pot for all eggs. Add those eggs that are to be hard-boiled, start timer. Add the eggs that should be soft when the remaining time fits. Remove all eggs together. (Hope that you can tell soft and hardboiled eggs apart because you marked ...


0

To address the second aspect: When the lid is on, there is just too much steam trapped in the vessel, which will interfere with frying/sauteeing, just as it is harder to saute in a really high vessel (say, a stockpot) even without a lid on... Also, depending on the lid material and shape, the steam can condense on the inside and result on water going back ...


1

Your question is a little odd: you first ask about two things to do with cooking in water, then you ask about browning, which never happens when cooking in water no matter how hard you try. You need higher temperatures than the 100C you can reach in boiling water. There's sort of an exception: if food sticks to the bottom of the pot when boiling, or if the ...


-2

Whether the lid will speed or slow the cooking, depends on the situation. High heat will only sometimes speed the cooking! The crucial knowledge to understand and apply is that boiling water doesn't get any hotter than 100˚C. Because of this, high heat won't cook already-boiling-hot food faster! Typically, the fastest way to cook something is to start ...



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