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4

The way fish (shelfish included) is dispatched impacts both its flavor and texture. The Japanese have a long history of this knowledge. This type of fish killing is called ike jime. Dave Arnold did some interesting research on this. You'll find it here: http://www.cookingissues.com/index.html%3Fp=5731.html Bottom line: How you kill a lobster does ...


2

Assuming you can get fresh lobster, you definitely should keep it as fresh as possible prior to cooking. Generally, that will mean keeping the bug alive until it's cooked. I haven't heard of this effect myself, and if it's true, I very much doubt that it's due to the lobster "suffering". If anything, it's probably just that a vigorous boil applies too much ...


0

IME, IMHO, IM Tales of Whatever...ayuh. I think this is made up. For a cooking method, it's better to steam than to boil. Small amount of water in a tightly covered pot - far less dilution of the juices/flavor. If you boil them you're making "lobster tea" all around them, and then eating the teabag. You don't see much in the way of places offering "boiled ...


4

Put some water in the pot Add vinegar or citric acid (whatever you can get your hands on more easily). (Sorry, I have no measurements, I always eyeball it. I guess up to 5% for vinegar is fine, or one or two teaspoons of citric acid depending on the pot-size...) Heat to a rolling boil... (do NOT put your head over the pot to see it it works, especially ...


4

There's an interesting article on The Straight Dope that tests the question of how well a microwave kills bacteria on pizza. Here's a few quotes: If I take a piece of pizza that's been sitting on the table awhile and microwave it, would that kill the bacteria, or am I just eating nice hot bacteria? Will a microwave kill microbes? Sure. Microwave ...


-1

Clingfilm is safe for using cold and wrapping cold foods to store in the (cold) fridge, NOT wrap foods up and put in hot water. This is insane. Please people, don't do this. Sorry to be five years late, but I was searching for the best ways to poach eggs and found this. This is NOT it.


1

I reckon this problem can be down to various things, but I thought the solution that worked for me might be worth sharing. I was using a cheap rice cooker, was washing the rice first, using the correct rice/water ratio, and wasn't over-filling or under-filling the cooker, but still it made a mess of the counter. What I observed was the mess wasn't coming ...


-1

The specific heat capacity (SHC) of water is 4.184, which is a measurement of how much energy (in kilojoules) it takes to raise 1 liter of water by 1 degree celsius. Your stovetop is constantly generating heat energy and transferring it through the pot and into the water, which absorbs it and raises its temperature. Once the temperature reaches 100 degrees ...


0

The reason chicken dries up when you are boiling it, or simmering it for that matter, is that the boiling process is all drawing away the oils. The oil holds the moisture in the chicken, therefore boiling the chicken pulls away the very thing that's allowing the chicken to stay moist. That's one reason why we baste turkeys and whole chickens, to keep it ...


2

As noted already, your skin dries out from excessive washing, long showers, etc. This is because you are drawing out the oils in your skin and washing them away with the water. The boiled meat is going through a similar process. Also, as noted above, when you heat a piece of meat it tenses up. The heat of the water causes the fats to liquefy, the tensing of ...


2

I may be wrong but I'll give it a shot. When you heat chicken (or any other muscle for that matter) it tenses up. As it tenses up it is essentially squeezing juices out, because all the fibres are closer together. Just think what happens when you slice a rare steak without letting it rest, there will be blood everywhere. In general I believe boiling ...


27

Physics to the rescue: Contrary to popular belief you cannot see steam. What you can see is tiny droplets of water that were steam (= gaseous form of water) before, but have condensed (= returned to liquid state) again on very small particles like dust motes. If the amount of droplets is big enough in a certain volume of air, they become visible. In other ...



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