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24

Physics to the rescue: Contrary to popular belief you cannot see steam. What you can see is tiny droplets of water that were steam (= gaseous form of water) before, but have condensed (= returned to liquid state) again on very small particles like dust motes. If the amount of droplets is big enough in a certain volume of air, they become visible. In other ...


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You Can Add Flavour to The food being Steamed. For example Steaming Mussels in Beer or wine you can also add thing to the bottom steaming pot such as blue cheese onions pepper, and those flavours will end up in the mussels in the top. and some of the Mussel flavour ends up in the bottom pot which happens to make a very nice soup.


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My stew is tomato and red wine based. The stew wouldn't be the same without the wine being the principle fluid component, and no the stew doesn't taste like wine at all when it's done. It gives it a complex fruity/floral quality and helps soften the meat. The stew is cooked at simmering for 2-1/2 hours. If the recipe calls for boiling the wine, then do it ...


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De-Glazing a pan with liquid (including wine) to make a sauce is a very common technique. It involves boiling the liquid to remove browned bits of food from the pan. De-Glazing Instructions This technique has been used for years and it seems move severe than what the recipe you mentioned is doing so I don't think you have anything to worry about.


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My Mother has always cooked her meatballs in water. Why? Well, first the meatballs had rice in the the meatball, parsley and depending on the cook prepared it, some other spices like minced garlic and all the indgredients listed above. She was making a soup with the liquid she was cooking the meatballs in and the meatballs were the size of tangerines, ...


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Boiling would set the shape of the meatballs and cook them more thoroughly, but you would lose a lot of the flavor! Baking would be a better way to cook them through.


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The only benefit I can think of is that it would be faster than pan-frying, because surrounding them with boiling water will get more heat into them more quickly. But from a flavor standpoint, they will not turn out as well, because some of the flavor of the meatballs will leach into the water you're cooking them in. This isn't a problem with frying, then ...


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There's a few reasons for utilizing this method: You'll end up with a juicier meatball, as it is cooked in liquid. It'll be rounder and more plump because it was cooked in a liquid. You'll be 100% sure that it was cooked thoroughly without being burned. The reason for the pan browning is just a reverse sear - purely for color/crunchiness and perhaps ...


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Pre warm chilled eggs in a bowl of hot tap water for 5 mins and put them straight into boiling water. Never crack!


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I have found that adding salt to pasta water helps the pasta hold the water when it comes in contact with the salt in the sauce. When the pasta was not cooked in salted water it weeps when sauce is served on top of undressed pasta. Dont know why? Just an observation.


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You might as well put the pasta in from cold because you will achieve an overall shorter waiting time. If you wait for water to boil, then you will inevitably be waiting for longer to cook your food. I've sat with a stop watch and timed two pots of pasta, one from cold and the other from boiling. Sure, boiling water cooks food faster but waiting for water ...


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As @user33210, vanilla extract is is prepared with alcohol, so adding it early to the cooking process allows a lot of the alcohol to evaporate, subsequently the vanilla aromatics as well. However, if you use vanilla beans instead you won't have this problem but instead end up getting a better vanilla smell in your dish.


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Please see the excerpt below from this site . All of the recipes I've seen for anko recommend changing the water but this is the only explanation I've found. Amy Escobar MARCH 12, 2014, 3:13 PM Hey Nami, do you know why the boiling water is emptied and then refilled? Cooking With Dog uses the same method and I don’t know the reason. REPLY ...


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Liquid vanilla extract has alcohol in it, so if you add this extract to hot cocoa, puddings, fudge, or anything you make with heat, the alcohol burns off and so does most of the flavor. If you wait for it to cool off the flavor stays strong. Same thing goes for artificial vanilla also because of the alcohol levels (but the flavor is just not there to begin ...



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