New answers tagged

0

How to keep a rice cooker from boiling over https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NsRmzEy8Kdk or keep a wet paper towel over the vent or place a wooden stick or string of rope across the container


1

Maybe you have heard of osmosis. Putting salt into the water when boiling vegetables (which are also slightly salty) will prevent water from entering the vegetables, hence decreasing the overall flavor of the vegetables.


-2

Adding salt just slows down or stops osmosis, so the cells of the vegetables do not blow up with water or burst. Salts cannot pass the cell walls, they are SEMI permeable, so there is no leakage of salts into the boiling water... otherwise you would not have osmosis at all. Likewise, the salt cannot get into the cells. Other nutrients may leak into the ...


3

There are a few common techniques: Use a taller pot. The more height from the water to the top of the pot, the more of the water is contained. Lower the ingredients in with a flexible cutting board. The board flexes into a half-cone over the pot, and allows you to drop the ingredients from a much lower height. Lower the ingredients over a utensil. A spider ...


2

You have to drop items in boiling water with less distance. Lesser the distance is , lesser the splashing. Hold Bowl or anything in which you have put your item in one hand and from other hand pick it up and drop it into water slowly. You can use gloves for protection.


2

Another possible solution is to use a cutting board to drop the food into the pot: If you have the thin flexible boards, you can grab the two shorter sides, curve the board, and slide things into the pot. If you put the board part way into the pot (so it's not quite in the water), there's a limited drop that will reduce the splashing. If you're using a ...


0

I am reckless, I just toss stuff in and have learned which way the splash is likely to come from and just move out of the way. Also the more you cook the more resistant to burning you become...to a point of course.


4

Put in your food slowly, as you already discovered. If they are largish pieces, e.g. whole potatoes, you just need the patience for it. If you have a bowl of something small like beans, use a ladle to take scoops out of the bowl and lower it into the water. In addition to 1, use a larger pot with higher sides, but don't fill it. A little bit of splash will ...


3

I have a bottle of imitation vanilla extract that's water based. I know from experience that adding it to a hot liquid results in a strong imitation vanilla scent being released into the air, which means less imitation vanilla flavor is staying in the liquid. I think it's safe to say that it wouldn't evaporate nearly as quickly as an alcohol based extract, ...


3

Googling, I found this report, presenting a chemical and technical analysis of curcumin. Skimming through it, it seems that degradation of the substance should not be a problem due to temperature, although the report doesn't say much about it except that it shouldn't be a problem: Curcumin is stable in dry food. It is relatively stable to heat so it can ...


-3

As far as I know, curcumin is stable, and should be able withstand prolonged heating.


0

You could fry it off with your veg base, remove it, make your soup and then add the chorizo to serve. Boiling chorizo is just a bit of a waste


0

This calls for a more refined answer then yes or no. (and this will no doubt generate some minus votes...but read me out). At the end of this answer you will find a YES, is you use your sauce reheated. How would you like to answer "is it safe to cross a road?". There is a risk of harm, so: no? That is the correct answer, but IMHO, not a usefull one.Nothing ...


0

In general (if it is about random sauce): Unless the sauce is so heavy in sugar (unlikely - 120°C would mean you are making a tomato syrup that will be as thick as honey when cool), oil or thickeners that it will reach pressure-canning temperatures when heated by an oven - NO. The cans are at ambient pressure, so any mixture in them that is dominated by ...


0

No, it is not safe. You need a pressure canner. That's what the USDA says about anything containing meat: There are no safe options for canning these foods listed below in a boiling water canner. See http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_04/soups.html for a table of pressures and processing times.



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