Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

Even given a standardized recipe and method, cooking times are always only a guideline. Quality recipes always give you a test for knowing when the product is done. The reason for this is that there are many uncontrolled (at least from the recipe author's point of view) such as, in the case of ribs: Exact dimensions of the ribs Natural variation in the ...


5

Three potential methods or changes you can try: soak the quail in brine for 2-3 hours before searing. You can do this in a large zip-lock sack or in a covered bowl. Make sure to store the quail/brine combo in your refrigerator during the soaking. Let quail reach room temperature before cooking. Pan-searing the quail might dry out the smaller pieces, i.e. ...


5

The collagen in the ribs needs to get to a temperature of about 160 F to start breaking down into water and gelatin. If your oven can be set as low as 175 or 180 F on a normal bake or convection bake setting that is probably a better alternative unless you have access to an oven thermometer and can measure what temperature the warm setting on your oven ...


5

Braising uses minimal liquid to achieve a moist, slow, cook. Stew is soup with attitude: it's much more liquid, with chunks of the star of the show floating in it.


4

Always let a braise cool in its liquid to prevent drying out. As the meat cools, the fibers relax, allowing the juices to be pulled back into the meat. Imagine squeezing out a sponge (heating the meat), and then releasing the sponge in water (cooling the meat). (People on this forum have disagreed with this statement before, but I stand by it.) Although ...


4

The above methods will work, but are slightly flawed. You can sous vide a whole quail, but it is inherently wrong to do so. The white (breast) meat is inherently more tender and requires less heat than the tougher legs and wings. Separating the breasts and wings/legs into two sous vide bags works the best. I like to cook the breasts at 130°F (55°C) (hold ...


4

Pot Roasting = Braising This more recent document from the same association, Cattlemen's Beef Board and National Cattlemen's Beef, supports this by using them interchangeably: 3 Simple Steps For Braising/Pot Roasting Beef I was trying to figure out what the document from your question may have been implying by the cuts the different cooking techniques were ...


3

I have done it both ways successfully. Flouring the meat before browning does give a little extra flavor, plus the flour continues to cook while the meat is braising. I personally think it gives a richer, deeper flavor and ensures that you won't have any raw flour flavor. If you are happy with your results using this method I wouldn't change it. :)


3

There should be no adjustments required: Yes, two pots take a few minutes longer to heat up than one, but with 4-5 hours total, it shouldn't matter.


3

Michael is correct in terms of the meat moistness/texture perspective. One thing to add: I've found that flavors continue develop in the refrigerator as well. You may remember times, for example, when you've tasted chili or spaghetti sauce the next day and found the flavor to have improved.


3

Braising is a combination of fast dry heat and long slow moist heat. The fast dry heat is able to create the flavorful crust on meat in ways that slow heat can't. The dry heat can be extremely hot air in the oven, direct radiation from a broiler, or contact with a hot steel or cast iron pan. The long slow moist heat creates a steaming process. Importantly, ...


3

From The Professional Chef: To braise meat, first sear it in hot fat to the desired color, then simmer it in a covered vessel in stock or another cooking liquid. The amount of liquid used in the braise is crucial to the success of the finished dish. One of the benefits of braising is that tough cuts of meat become tender as the moist heat gently ...


3

I've never seen any benefit to turning a roast. If you want to minimize the crust, use a roaster with a lid or a roasting bag, but the rule is always low even temperature and slow roasting for the best meat. A crock pot is also a good way to slowly braise a tough roast. Coming from a beef ranch, we'd put a roast in the oven at about 100-125F at 7 in the ...


3

If you are simmering, boiling or poaching something, the depth does not matter. As long as your food is completely immersed in liquid, all the liquid has a sufficiently regular temperature due to convection, and it cooks well. So the stews you mention are no problem, you can fill the pot up to the brim. Braising is a different beast entirely. In braising, ...


2

Generically speaking meat that is appropriate for a braise is tougher and has connective tissue that can be turned to gelatin by the long slow cooking process. As you've noted, meat that is tender can be "cooked to death" using that same method, so I would, generally, recommend against using a braise. However, a stove top braise can go quickly without ...


2

You can make some very good sauces, based on demi-glace. Bordelaise (if you add chopped shallots, red wine and a bit of marrow) (eat it with grilled beef, steak or pork) Robert (if you add chopped onions, vinegar and white wine, and a bit of mustard) (fits very well with grilled pork) Zingara (chop ham, mushrooms and truffle into tiny pieces) (You can mix ...


2

The resulting quality of a braise has to do with the connective tissue rather than the fat. Your recipe calls for the blade chop because it is close to the shoulder, which is tougher and contains more connective tissue. This tissue is tough to start, but braising breaks it down into a gelatin and makes the meat tender (and juicy). When you pick your chops, ...


2

You really need an accurate oven thermometer - the thermostats on domestic oven are notoriously bad, especially at controlling low temperatures.


2

If your issue is with the meat being too tough and dry, then your best bet is to marinate beforehand. Marination is the process of soaking food in seasoning before hand to flavor meat and also to cause the marinade to break down some of the tissues in the meat. This will cause more moisture to be absorbed into the end result. This will likely solve your too ...


2

There are only three advantages that I can think of for a brasier: The lower sides result in faster evaporation when cooking on the stove top, as it doesn't hold in the steam. It's typically not as heavy for the same surface area. You should be able to fit two of them in your oven (on different racks), which is unlikely for a dutch oven. Personally, I ...


2

Hello Charles and welcome to Seasoned Advice! As @Stephie notes in her comment, this is probably opinion-based, but I find it to be a relevant question that a newer cook may have. So, as a more experienced cook I am going to answer. I have several Le Creuset Dutch ovens as well as a LC braiser pan. I always end up using the Dutch oven for braising, even if ...


2

I have this shape (without lid) as a cast iron pan, not enameled. I mainly use it in the oven, not on stovetop. It's a great pan for gyvetch, moussaka and generally Middle eastern oven dishes. You can brown the meat and sweat the onions in it on stovetop, then add the other ingredients and put it in the oven. All the juices stay in the pan - if you brown ...


2

"For the same time" seems to be your problem here. An oven will warm a pot much more slowly than a stovetop, especially a heavy iron stew pot. You'll need to monitor your temperature, and only count the time after it reaches 68 Celsius. The warming up phase can be easily close to an hour in the stove, eating away a lot of the actual cooking time.


2

One layer ensures even cooking. However, I can't say I've never sneaked another portion or two into the braising pot...with no ill effects. The important point is that you have a very moist environment. These kinds of recipes are fairly forgiving. One caveat...filling the pot too much could compromise the ingredients. You mention arroz con pollo. I ...


1

No time adjustments should be required. I say should only because if your oven is not exactly at 325 it may take less or more time. Also the top shelf is warmer than the bottom and you may have to rotate the meats. The recipe may say 4-5 hours or until done. In cooking butts low and slow is what is recommended. I do mine on my Green Egg BBQ and also in the ...


1

One potential downside to this method is that with a thick coat of flour, you're mostly browning the flour, not the meat, and thus possibly creating different flavor compounds than if you were searing the meat directly. Maillard reactions are complicated stuff. If you're doing this, you should probably shake off excess flour to leave a very thin layer so ...


1

As some of the commenters have noted, this just might not be possible. Water is the enemy of crispy, and unfortunately for your chicken skin braising is all about moist heat. I would try searing the skin before braising, if you don't already, in order to get some of the fat rendered out and the Maillard reaction on it's way. Braise as you would, but remove ...


1

Spare ribs and pork shoulder are both cooked in an oven at the same temperature(~225F) for me. The difference is time. A pork shoulder takes at least 8 hours but usually around 12 hours to give good pulled pork. Ribs are closer to 3-4 hours for the meat to get tender but not so tender that they fall off the bone. I have never cooked country style ribs but ...


1

I gave it a shot! I took the oxtails out and seared them in a cast iron pan underneath the broiler in my oven. Once they were pretty much blackened on all sides, I dropped in a bit of the stew and simmered it down very briefly using residual heat from the cast iron. It was a surprise how quickly it infused with the caramel flavor from the meat. I added the ...


1

Marination can only happen before cooking, after cooking it is simply adding a sauce. A marinade is generally used to help flavor meat and make it more tender by chemically breaking down the meat. Marinades tend to be strongly flavored and acidic, so adding them after may overpower the flavor of the meat. If doesn't sound like marination is your problem ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible