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The short answer is yes, sourdough breads are generally more resistant to fungus due to the fermentation process of the sourdough starter. The reasons for this are only now becoming understood. This article summarizes this study from the Journal of Applied and Environmental Microbiology: Sourdough is different from traditional bread because it takes an ...


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From personal experience, the "anti microbial properties" of sourdough diminish depending on the moisture content of the bread. The type of flour and hydration of the dough impact this. I've made "all white" and "30-60% [of flour content] wheat bran" breads using sourdough starter and long (overnight) bulk fermentation. The wheat/oats tend to hold on to ...


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Yep, shortening is a very standard substitution for lard. I can't swear that you're going to love the results, or that it will be every bit as soft, but there is no good reason not to try.


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Vinegar is acetic acid. It is made when yeast eat starch and produce alcohol which is then consumed by acetobacter bacteria to make acetic acid. I have a hard time imagining a bread smelling strongly of vinegar but all the ingredients are there. The bread was fermented by yeast and did contain alcohol before it was baked. If the bread was a little ...


1

Kneading dough has a few functions. First, it distributes the ingredients together evenly and allows the flour to become hydrated. As the flour starts to absorb water, enzymatic reactions occur and some proteins begin to mesh together. The two most important in this process are glutenin and gliadin. When these proteins start to get tangled up together, they ...


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I've have now done it, and it's lovely. It gives a very slight tang to the bread, almost like a little nod to sourdough. I definitely like that it's full-fat, it's just richer. I used this: Powdered Goat's Milk which is available in most grocery stores here (at drastically different prices, one store's normal price is three times another store's normal ...


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The freezer exacts a price on bread. If frozen and thawed correctly, many bread will come out fine, but from that point forward, their shelf lives will be shorter than they would have been had they not been frozen. That makes the freezer a good idea for mid- to long-term storage for breads that you plan to finish within a day or two after having been thawed. ...


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Personally I have had varied results when freezing bread. I have had some that came out wonderfully after a couple of months. I have also had some that after a couple of days came out very dry. Note that when freezing bread, I only freeze fresh, and in a very short amount of time after getting it home. I find that results vary depending on the type and brand ...



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