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7

Well, technically there is a minor difference between biga and poolish, but often the terms are used interchangeably. Just for clarification: A poolish uses equal parts (by weight) of flour and water and very little yeast (sources vary between 0.1% to 1% fresh yeast / 0.03%1 to 0.33% dry yeast of flour weight). This leads to a poolish being rather liquid ...


6

First off, there is a way bakers measure the proportions of ingredients that is pretty unique to bread—everything is measured relative to the amount of flour by weight. A ratio of 0.6 (or 60%) means if you use 10oz of flour, you use 6oz of that other ingredient. There are typical ranges for these. For example, salt will typically be 1–2%, yeast (depending ...


4

What seems a straight cut at the finished batard often started as horizontal deep cut: Hold the blade almost horizontally and make a cut that basically creates a flap of dough or "overlap" of 1.5 cm or more. Oven spring expands the overlap, giving these wide "bands" on the surface. High hydration doughs are a bit "sticky", so vertical cuts are prone to be ...


4

I agree with many elements of the previous answers -- it could be due to the wet dough "resealing" and/or to the crust hardening too early and preventing further expansion. Doing a more horizontal slash than a vertical one is helpful to get good "ears," and extra moisture will keep the crust softer for a little longer to get more oven spring. Frankly, ...


4

The theory is unlikely. The interior of dough rarely gets more than a few degrees above boiling, and it usually "stalls" for a significant amount of time in the 210-212F range. The only way to go above that is to dry the dough out completely, resulting in a cracker-like consistency. That's the reason why the crust has a different texture, color, etc. than ...


3

No, they are quite different. Barley flour is just the milled grain, but malt has been sprouted so it has much higher enzymatic activity and is much sweeter. It is usually used to precipitate an enzymatic reaction in your bread, which plain barley flour won't do. The recipe may work by just leaving the malt extract out, but it may brown less or rise more ...


3

It depends on why your bread machine is having you keep your yeast dry: If it's because you're putting a bunch of ingredients in the night before and setting the machine to have bread ready for breakfast (e.g., on a delay), then you have to use dry yeast. The yeast needs to stay dry so it doesn't start growing until the machine is ready to start. If its ...


2

What's happening is that your bread crust is hardening before the expansion is done, and the crust splits at the weakest point. You need moisture to keep it soft and pliable until it stops expanding. The options are: Put a pan of boiling water in your oven at the start of your bake, then remove the pan once your bread stops expanding Put your bread in a ...


2

Increase the amount of Semolina flour to strengthen the dough. I use 3/4 semolina and 1/4 cup Whole Wheat and 2 and 1/2 cup White flour. Too much hydration will add to the ripping and a tight gluten bond will resist stretching and want to spring back. To get a thin stretchy dough that is very relaxed I added a process the works well to provide a slight ...


1

In my experience you have 3 choices. Lightly spray with water, oil of your liking (olive, canola, grapeseed, or sunflower not vegetable, and lastly, my favorite, brush on lightly sweet unsalted butter. Preheat your over to 350 degrees F (give or take 25 degrees) and do not keep in oven more than 5-7 minutes depending on how round your bread loaf is. ...


1

I notice that the recipe calls salt optional. Have you been using the tablespoon of salt? If not, I recommend you add it. Salt controls the fermentation rate of the yeast and strengthens the gluten protein. Bread made without it will be dense, with a very hard crust. Otherwise, it sounds like your dough isn't receiving a long enough rise, or you may have ...


1

Edited; expanding on answer. The two most common issues for bread is not enough water and not enough proofing. Although there are many ways to get there it all revolves around not having enough CO2 in bread because of under-expansion. 90% of the time root causes is due to a lack of moisture during one of the steps... So dry or tough bread can be the ...


1

In my personal experience, the role of salt in bread is mostly myth, reiterated over and over until it's accepted as fact by many people. I haven't salted dough for something in excess of 25 years, and I have not noticed any textural loss either when I stopped salting, or in comparison to other people's bread. When I last had this discussion with someone ...


1

I've only ever used white flour and water, nothing else. I mix mine with equal weights of both to get a 100% hydration starter. Nothing else is at all necessary.


1

I've never used anything other than good old bread flour or all-purpose flour. I've had a lot of success with Peter Reinhart's system of doubling the weight of your starter with equal parts flour and water. In other words, if your starter weighs 4 ounces, feed your starter with 2 ounces flour and 2 ounces water. Hope this helps!



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