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5

The difference between gluten and gliadin is the one already explained in your question: Gliadin is a precursor to gluten. You could say that gliadin is to gluten what grains are to porridge. Gluten is the result of glutenin reacting with gliadin in the presence of water, just like porridge is the result of grains "reacting" with milk in the presence of ...


5

Disclaimer: I'm not too familiar with the english technical terms, but I'll try and explain what's happening without them. Watch a shaped bread during the final rise: Right after shaping, the interior is still dense because the co2 bubbles from the yeast haven't developed yet. The surface is firm and the shape round(-ish), if you poke gently with a ...


4

The crown is the first thing that sets when you put the bread in the oven. Then, as the center of the loaf heats up, it rises and cracks the top, which has already set. I don't think you can prevent it completely, unless you change your recipe to a denser kind of bread that doesn't rise very much while baking. Otherwise, I find that you can minimise cracking ...


3

The vibrations will have an effect: On you, because it will be harder to judge the "ripeness" of your refreshed sourdough. You often want to catch the point "just before its starts to go down again" - which will be hard to do when the shaking machine bursts the bubbles all the time. I doubt that the yeasts and bacteria in the starter will mind - they ...


3

They make whole wheat flour, but their bread flour is definitely refined; it does not contain bran or germ. Their bread flour is milled from a specific hard red spring wheat from North and South Dakota. That particular wheat is higher in protein than the wheat and wheat blends of other brands of bread flour. KA's whole wheat flour (not the white whole ...


3

One cause of gumminess in 100% rye breads is excessive starch degradation related to amylase enzyme actions. Amylase action is slowed down by increasing acidity. You can increase the acidity by adding a small amount of lemon juice or cream of tartar to your dough as described here. In his books "Whole Grain Breads" and "Crust and Crumb", Peter Reinhart ...


3

If you were going to take the refrigerator approach, it's important to consider when you want to refridgerate it. Immediately after making the dough, stash two of the doughballs in the fridge. Take the first one out after about 25-30 minutes, and the second one out after another 25-30 minutes. This should give you roughly a 30 minute difference between ...


3

The most straightforward approach (especially if you're letting a stand mixer or similar do the work) is to just make three batches, starting the 2nd batch half an hour later than the first, and the third an hour in. Then they should more or less become ready as you're ready to put them in the oven. Upside, it will work exactly as you're used to. Downside, ...


2

I would check your oven temperature to be sure it's actually right, and also I'm wondering if you're over-proofing your dough, which could possibly result in it deflating when it goes into the oven, or at the very least result in a lackluster rise.


2

It's any loaf with a crispy crust. There's not much more to it than that. If you can't find sourdough or Vienna, just use a standard white loaf with a crisp crust.


2

I don't believe you would want to try to leaven bread with beer only, though you could certainly use it as a flavoring. First, the amount of yeast still present in a brewed batch of beer is very low. Beers that have been bottle carbonated (or bottle conditioned) will have more than others but, particularly with high gravity beers (beers with a lot of ...


2

I have several bannetons (also called brotforms). Two are wicker and 2 are cane (you can also find them made from wood pulp). I simply use a small, stiff pastry brush to clean away any flour left behind. Sometimes I find it helpful to leave it out overnight so the flour dries and it is easier to brush away. I have even given the canes a quick rinse but I ...


2

I have been baking no-knead bread in a heavy porcelain 2-qt.soufflé dish with a glass lid with great success and consistent crust on all sides. My recipe is based on Jim Lahey's magical recipe at http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/11376-no-knead-bread but I use only 1 1/2 cups water, 1 cup white whole wheat flour, 2 cups of bread flour,1 1/4 tsp. ...


2

The problem is that the dough is so moist on most no-knead breads, that the weight of the bread itself will crush down, leading to a difference in texture between the top and bottom of the loaf. I suspect that's the reason that they often tell you to bake them in a pre-heated cast iron pot -- so that the bottom will set before the warmth of the oven causes ...


2

The answer is mostly just "it's tradition", as with most questions like this. I do think the pattern you've described isn't quite the actual one. What really happens is that we tend to eat peanut butter and jelly on sandwiches, and put one or the other on single slices of bread, because with a sandwich you can spread one thing on each half and put them ...


2

You can't really tell by looking, at least not without a known sample of the same brand. The good news is that they are usually interchangeable 1:1. Make a recipe you know well. Does it rise as you expect? Or does it take more or less time? That will most likely give you your answer. If the dough behaves as usual, it's a good bet that you have what you ...


2

What you are describing is the result of 'oven spring'. When a properly proofed piece of dough is placed in a hot oven it will begin to expand or spring. If the the oven is dry or the skin is not sliced it will set rather quickly, resulting in cracks. There are two things that affect how quickly the skin sets: Steam Slicing the skin Steam allows the ...


1

What seems a straight cut at the finished batard often started as horizontal deep cut: Hold the blade almost horizontally and make a cut that basically creates a flap of dough or "overlap" of 1.5 cm or more. Oven spring expands the overlap, giving these wide "bands" on the surface. High hydration doughs are a bit "sticky", so vertical cuts are prone to be ...


1

There's only onw way that I know to tell the two apart without using it: granule size Instant is (typically?) smaller than (most?) active dry yeast. However, unless you have a magnifying glass, and maybe some source of yeast for a comparison, it's going to be very, very difficult to tell them apart. I don't know how much granule size is a function of ...


1

As Catija has mentioned, the yeast in beer is dead and typically filtered out. There does exist a class of recipes that are 'beer breads', in which you add beer or similar bubbly beverage ... but they're quick breads, not yeast breads. Unlike using sparkling water in tempura, or beer cider in a beer batter, where you rely on the trapped bubbles to give the ...


1

I can think of one case where yeast doughs shouldn't suffer from mechanical mixing: If you're going to be rolling out the dough (eg, for filling & making dumpling-like products, or rolling balls for monkey bread), you'd normally end up compressing the air bubbles when rolling it. Mechanical mixing has the same problem, so the difference between ...


1

As explained in my older answer Joe linked in a comment, the purpose of stretch and fold is to align the gluten sheets, producing the typical structure of kneaded bread. Depending on your final shaping, you end up with either a sheetlike structure (e.g. in ciabatta) or with spirals/threads in kozunak and other braided breads. One reason to not do the ...


1

The only "loaf pan with a lid" I'm familiar with is the "Pullman" pan. I have seen suggestions to use a board wrapped in foil or foil under a casserole dish set on top of a regular loaf pan if trying to emulate that form without the right pan. Foil alone would probably not hold. I don't own one and have never emulated it. I suppose if someone was using a ...


1

Experiment more. I'm not a slavish recipe-follower, and while I have the occasional brick when I screw up badly, I have yet to make actually inedible bread in several decades of playing fast and loose with bread recipes. Loaves that were not what I wanted, which I avoided repeating, yes. So bad it went in the garbage rather than be eaten, no. I would ...


1

Putting it in the fridge probably didn't help matters any. If you had left it on the counter overnight it would probably have gotten its act in gear without further help. Yeast works slower when cool than when warm, but it does work, given time. IMPE, dry packet yeast going bad is somewhere between rare and unheard of - unless it's stored somewhere that is ...


1

If you increase the volume of a closed container which can't expand anymore, it will cause the container to break because there is no more space to expand unless the container gives way. This is what happens with bread. The top becomes fixed in shape as it looses moisture and looses its ability to expand. When the inside part expands, the lack of space will ...


1

What a lot of these instructions for starting a sourdough starter don't say is that you can start your starter using, say, a teaspoon of flour and a teaspoon of water. Then the next time you add flour and water, you add 2 teaspoons of each. And increase it from there. You do NOT need to start with a cup of flour and a cup of water. My goodness, that's so ...


1

The best way is to par bake the bread (until it's solid but not browned - about 50% of the cooking time) then freeze. If you let the par baked bread cool to room temperature and then freeze it unwrapped until it is hard. Once it's frozen wrap it in cling film (plastic wrap) and aluminium foil


1

I too have found that adding liquid gradually eases problem, but does not eliminate it. The dough does not get tossed around in bottom of bowl by the hook as it should, but clings to hook and only minimal kneading is happening. The issue is the bowl not being wider, and so the hook also needs to be slim elongated and screw like, not wide and to side of ...



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