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6

From what I can tell from the picture, most of the white stuff is flour; it was likely like that when you bought it, but only you & your memory know for sure. The non-bread & non-white occasional spots in the picture appear to be the olives. Overall, unless you spot obvious mold, which is more often green than white, I think you are OK to consume ...


4

It's a bean flour, so substitute another bean flour - chickpea/garbanzo is perhaps the most commonly available one, IME. Beans bring protein, fiber and fat to the recipe. Soy has considerably more fat (oil) than chickpeas, so you might need to add some oil (or higher-oil things like nut or sunflower seed butters.) "Fermented soybean powder" is available, ...


4

Okay, I usually don't answer my own questions but by the time I got done writing up my question the answer came to me: On day 1 take your one portion of starter and divide it in half. The other half can either be shared with a friend or thrown away. (I promise I won't tell!) On day 5, instead of adding 1 cup of milk/flour/sugar just add 1/2 a cup of each. ...


3

Do you want rye bread, or do you want "the taste you may associate with rye bread?" (caraway seeds) If you want bread that tastes like seeded rye, caraway seeds will get you 99.5% of the way there - they are rather overpowering and appear to be what most people "mean" when they say "rye bread" in my experience. They can be put in wheat bread without most ...


3

Caraway seeds in rye bread is - in some parts of the world - a tradition. Generally speaking, certain flavour profiles are traditional in different cuisines, not ubiquitous (see your baguette counter example), for many types of food. For rye bread, taking European areas into account where there is a "rye bread tradition", Northern Europe (Scandinavia, ...


2

Speed is not the point. Speed is the opposite of the point. Refrigerator rising makes for a long, slow rise and flavor development - it's not unique to sourdough, it's very common in pizza dough (though not usually the "final rise" in pizza, as that would be very difficult to arrange enough fridge space for.) You can do it, or not, or try both and compare. ...


2

I would add that if you are starting your starter (as opposed to feeding it) then honey (though not sugar) could be a good idea in the first day or two as it honey often has yeast/bacteria that can help establish your colony (raw honey would be best for this). Similarly, fresh pineapple juice and probiotic yogurt attempt to do similar things by "seeding" the ...


1

If you read some of the reviews on the one that says to bake for 45 minutes (Brennan's), many of them say it was done in less time: sunnieday: Really great and simple recipe. Recommended cook time is too long. I cooked mine for about 25 minutes and it was perfect. Will use this again. Nutmeg~n~Pepper After making as written and baking for the ...


1

Not clear what you mean, terminology is non-standard. I'm going to guess you mean what the rest of us call resting or relaxing the dough when working/forming it. If you overwork dough, the gluten strands that hold it together will tear and break. If you stretch and work the dough until it's springing back, but has not torn, and then let it rest for 5-10 ...


1

You should still use two rises if that's what the recipe calls for. The main differences are that instant yeast does not require proofing, and you can use a bit less of it because more of the yeast is viable. The full article is behind a paywall here (https://www.cookscountry.com/how_tos/6140-yeast-101), but here's a short excerpt summarizing the ...


1

At "a fancy deli" I'd be thinking kaiser roll. Because it's a deli, not a burger joint... And, of course, because... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGJd8FLAqRA


1

I seldom eat hamburgers, but one place I really like is Fuddrucker's. Their buns are baked in-house and are considered by many people to be the "perfect" sandwich bun. You'll get many hits by Googling "Fuddrucker bun recipe", for example: Ultimate Hamburger Buns Recipe for Fuddrucker's Burger Buns Also, if you search YouTube for "Fuddruckers bun" ...


1

I don't think there is one answer to your question. Every restaurant makes a choice about what it thinks a high end bun is. I would personally say either a brioche bun or an onion roll. I think the key is that the bread is fresh, it's different from a white bread bun, and it gets a little TLC itself. I would choose one of the two buns I did, because there ...


1

Two reasons to final proof in the fridge... Flavour Convenience Time = flavour. Increasing the fermentation time helps bring out more flavour. If you are too busy to follow the recipe through then you can use your fridge for convenience.



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