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While legal specifics vary from place to place, the "best before" on a product is often a requirement, but exactly what it is is left up to the manufacturer. In other words, they have to provide one, but it can be anything they want (there may be rules about guaranteeing nutritional content for the duration, if that is subject to degradation). So ...


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Yes, you can add the chutney to the bread dough to produce a more flavorful bread. When you add the chutney depends on exactly how you want it distributed in the bread. If you'd like the chutney flavor to permeate the bread throughout, mix directly in with the wet ingredients during the initial mix. If you prefer to have "streaks" of chutney or layers, ...


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Well, partially this depends on what kind of bread you are talking about. There is likely to be a bit of difference in how you scale the baking time depending on if it is a really wet quick bread (generally made with baking powder or baking soda like most banana bread) versus if it is a yeast leavened bread. Depending on the type you may need to adjust time ...


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I use 1 tsp wheat gluton per 1 cup of all purpose flour, for my white breads and sweet doughs. In whole wheat bread I use 2 tsp per cup of wheat or rye flour, Sure does make things raise nicely.


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slice it very thinly, brush it with olive oil, and bake it in the oven at 250 degrees until very dry. Makes great crackers. Sprinkle the olive oil with garlic salt or other herbs.


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If it's pretzel bread, it may be dipped in a hot soda solution before baking, or lye for the brave and very, very careful. That would mostly be about the crust, rather than the density. Several sources suggest baking baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) to convert it to (food grade) sodium carbonate for a stronger (than bicarbonate) alkali without needing to ...


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Bread is a shelf stable food. lasts indefinitely food safety wise, and this has nothing to do with preservatives. It is simply dry enough to last. So the date on it doesn't matter. We throw out bread when it's too hard to bite into, or repurpose it for something else (breadcrumbs). The exception is when it's stored under somewhat humid conditions. Then it ...


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This has the looks of a heavily enriched bread. Being dense is only a side effect of this. The taste people like in enriched bread doesn't come from being dense, and if you tried any other method of making it dense (e.g. using whole flours), you'd be disappointed. Look for recipes which use sufficient milk, fat and eggs, and try these. Although lots of fat ...



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