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12

Leavening is rising by any means, so baking soda and baking powder (chemical leaveners) both apply here, as does yeast (fermentation). Chemical leaveners like baking soda and powder work by mixing an acid (varies, depending on the recipe) and base (usually baking soda in some form) to produce carbon dioxide gas. Fermentation is the process of yeast ...


5

The theory is unlikely. The interior of dough rarely gets more than a few degrees above boiling, and it usually "stalls" for a significant amount of time in the 210-212F range. The only way to go above that is to dry the dough out completely, resulting in a cracker-like consistency. That's the reason why the crust has a different texture, color, etc. than ...


3

This article indicates that the elevated temperature would retard staling, It has been shown that changes in the starch contributes about 93, 50 and 20 percent of the total crumb firmness at 20°C, 30°C and 36°C, respectively, during five days of storage. The results imply that changes in the starch in the crumb are about one-half and one-fourth ...


3

French Toast is just French toast because you are soaking it in egg and pan or griddle frying it. You can use white sandwich bread, Italian loaf, French baquette, wheat bread what ever. I think we evolved to this in the French toast category. I don't think the garlic would taste good with the sweet syrup. So yeah Weird. Personal taste though. If its not an ...


2

Good dough is not about being "conditioned". You can use that stuff to get the last 5% of perfection when you have already managed the first 95% with good process and ingredients, but it won't do magic. In this case, you seem to expect whole wheat to act the same way as white flour. This is simply not possible. There is a large chemical difference between ...


2

Of the various things listed when looking up "dough conditioners" the only ones I'd think of using at home would be malted barley flour, lethicin and L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C.) An alternative for what the C is doing (oxidising) would be to buy your flour ahead and age it a few weeks for natural oxidising; possibly keeping it under refrigeration to reduce ...


2

Summary: If the loaf is kept at an elevated temperature in a plastic bag for a period of 6-12 hours I believe you will see little to no difference compared to storing at room temperature. Stored at an elevated temperature in a paper bag the loaf will start to dry out to a noticeable extent. Note that the answer below does not address possible food safety ...


2

I have been using a starter I started with a Belgium blonde for some time now. I feed it every twelve hours because it stays out all the time. It has a great funky sour taste. I use it in everything. Never really worried about pH. It bubbles away and raises nice. I do sometimes add yeast though.


2

I have read a lot of theories on this and only one makes sense to me. You knead your dough again to redistribute the yeast in the bread Commercial yeast is very concentrated, and if you don't allow for a second rise, you will have areas with very little yeast development and areas with high concentration of yeast (hence the air bubbles) I should note that ...


1

'Quick cooking' (aka 'instant') oats have been cooked more, and are in smaller pieces than regular (aka. 'old fashioned', aka. 'rolled' oats). If you'd prefer more texture in the bread, go with the old fashioned oats. If you're trying to make them less noticable, go with the quick cooking oats. If you only have one on hand, go with whatever it is that you ...


1

Here is a link to a page on Ellen's Kitchen with copycat recipes for the rolls from Ryan's, Golden Corral, and Logan's Roadhouse. I have not tried these recipes yet but I found it interesting how different they are.


1

Mailliard reactions. I'm going to guess there's already another question for this one and this will prove a duplicate, so low-effort answer. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maillard_reaction Basically (and I don't claim to know any better than that) it's alterations in the proteins brought about at elevated temperatures (there may also be carmelization, but ...


1

I will, as usual, suggest experimentation. At times, I make bread, knead it, form it, drop in in a pan, let it rise once, and bake it. It's expedient. It's bread, and usually quite decent bread at that. Other times I rise and punch down/re-knead a bit 1, 2 or even 3 times. Other days I make a wet sloppy mess I can't really knead and pour/scape it into ...



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