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31

Making bread without sugar is nothing strange - I do so several times a week! The wheat flour (or whatever you're using) contains enzymes which, when you blend it with water, breaks down starch to sugars which fermenting agents such as yeast or lactobacilli can feed off. The Wikipedia page on sourdough has more info.


28

You do not need sugar to make bread. The majority of traditional, rustic breads use just 4 ingredients - water, yeast, flour, and salt. Consequently, rising times are slower (usually resulting in better flavour) and the bread goes stale quicker (hence, for example, the French practice of buying fresh bread every day). Sugar softens bread by slowing gluten ...


21

I assume, by sugar you mean sucrose. However, yeast actually prefers glucose and maltose, see nutritional requirements of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and also proofing. Luckily, we get glucose and maltose "for free" from the flour, see this article on bread chemistry: Flour naturally contains both α- and β-amylases, which between them break down some of ...


13

Sugared bread is something mostly specific to the US. There might be a little sugar in European bread, but not much. From a personal opinion as a Belgian, I have to say that the few time I ate sugared bread (Harry's American bread), I found that it completely ruined the taste of the condiment on my bread, as well as make the bread less suitable to be used ...


5

I would assume the sugar is added for more "optimized" and foolproof bread making (industrialized) It is not necessary at all. Also in the "old time", people had access to other types of sugar ( honey,fruits, ... ) and as far as I known, big fluffy bread is quite recent in the history of time.


3

Yogurt is acidic, much more so than milk. So when you substitute it for milk, you're affecting the acid-base balance in your recipe, and you may need to change some of the baking powder to baking soda to restore it.


3

As DrRandy said in the comments, cookies are really far from banana bread. It's going to be pretty difficult. I would suggest instead looking for a banana cookie recipe. Even if you don't like the first one you find, you can use it as a starting point or find another, and you'll go through a lot fewer failed batches than you will if you try to start from ...


2

Airiness, whether with big holes or little holes, occurs when the proof is near complete. That is, the yeast has stretched the gluten very close to its maximal length without going beyond. All other things being equal, the key to airiness is knowing when the bread has risen fully, and then to put it immediately into a very very hot oven. This applies to ...


2

In my mind, bread baking containers are divided into two categories: 1- Pans for shape Many bread pans are used only to give bread shape. These can very from "normal" loaf pans for sandwich bread to baguette pans. These pans need to just stay out of the way of the heat as much as possible. Baguette pans are even perforated for this reason. They are ...


2

Just remove 1/2 to 3/4 of the starter and feed the remaining starter as usual. The process of feeding should reduce the sour and normalize the ph level. You don't need a lot of starter to keep it going. Sometimes I'll just keep a tablespoon and feed it 2 oz. water and 2 oz. of flour (100% hydration). If I know I won't tend to it for a while (e.g. 3 to 4 ...


2

The short answer to dense bread is always rise. There are many solutions to rise problems. There are also many other bread problems that are not just about rise (colour, flavour, wetness, shape). However, denseness is always about the rise. Rise happens when microbes (yeast) make air pockets in a network of gluten (or starch, in the case of rye and ...


2

Bread flour has more gluten, which is a protein that makes bread stretchy and less crumbly when the dough is prepared right. There is plenty of whole wheat bread flour out there, and you can often get mixes which are specifically made for bread machines, I'd start with those and see how you go. If you cannot find them in your local store you might be able to ...


2

Baking soda can be added to bread that uses a starter in order to get a faster rise, and it will slightly offset the sourness. Usually this is done by mixing a fairly wet sponge with the starter, water, and flour, then adding the soda and salt to the final flour and mixing it in. The soda will begin to react pretty quickly, frequently allowing you to bake ...


1

Bread machines require higher protein flour for good results. You noticed this when you switched from AP to bread flour. Whole wheat flour typically has less available gluten that white bread flour. It also has all the bran that can make a loaf feel heavier- but gives it all that nutty flavor. You can mix some wheat flour into bread flour to get the flavor ...


1

I added baking soda to the final rise of my slightly-overmatured-starter baguettes today. The flavour was fine, not sure if that's because the starter wasn't that sour or because of the baking soda. It didn't seem to have many adverse effects on the flavour anyway, so I would encourage anyone considering this method to try it. One thing: Adding during ...


1

Bread dough can be baked with or without a baking pan, tin, or pot. Pans and tins (and rarely pots) are used to give bread a specific shape, without one the dough will simply spread out. Bread pans are usually pretty thin, you don't need a thick material to bake bread in, and thin is cheaper. You don't need to spend a lot on equipment to bake good bread, ...


1

There are three factors that will make dough rise more quickly: 1- More water 2- More yeast 3- More heat from any source More yeast will make the bread rise more quickly but won't create the sticky texture and better flavor that you describe. More heat will be the same, not just from your heated water but also the temperature of the room- it would ...


1

I think adding the butter twice could maybe account for it. extra hydration, then collapse. That seems like quite a bit of fat already. (just based on what I've done myself) If the dough is normally close to being over hydrated, when it gets too close to the stage where it collapses, a tiny bit more liquid can tip it over the edge. Maybe even an unusually ...


1

About the recipe: Naan is traditionally made with yogurt to leaven it. It would have to sit for at least 4 hrs, or up to 12, depending on how warm it is. Yeast was not traditionally used in india (though is now), and baking soda is also a newer introduction. Milk or water can be used interchangeably. Milk will make it a bit softer. This is just ...


1

I've been letting my pizza dough rise in reusable plastic containers with plastic lids (I coat the bottom and sides of the containers with a bit of olive oil so that the dough doesn't stick). Seems to work just fine, and it's incredibly easy.



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