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4

It's a bean flour, so substitute another bean flour - chickpea/garbanzo is perhaps the most commonly available one, IME. Beans bring protein, fiber and fat to the recipe. Soy has considerably more fat (oil) than chickpeas, so you might need to add some oil (or higher-oil things like nut or sunflower seed butters.) "Fermented soybean powder" is available, ...


3

I'm not so lucky as to be able to get whole raw milk… Wait, then there's a flaw in your premise. Check the label. Any milk treated using high-heat processes like UHT, pasteurization or ultra-pasteurized milk doesn't sour like it used to in your grandmother's days; it spoils… goes rotten. Spoiled milk is not the same as soured milk. The ...


3

It's not a specific date, as there are just too many variables -- what temperature it's been stored at, and how many days since the seal has been broken are likely more significant. Growing up, my mom would use it for pancakes and baking once it started to smell a little bit off, but would dispose of it when it started to curdle (separate & get chunky). ...


3

Tangzhong (water roux) and levain are two fundamentally different things. The roux does not contain any leavening element, it is simply a method to bind water, effectively increasing the amount of water that can be used in a dough and therefore making a light, soft, moist bread. A levain (sourdough) is the part that is responsible to create the "lift" due ...


3

Oil was the answer for me when trying to shape my rye bread. As the rye flour is stickier then bread flour which in turn makes the blended flours stickier then normal. It made the dough as workable as my regular dough from bread flour alone. My experience is in using the no knead method. Using the oil on my hand actually worked very well. I had zero ...


2

I would add that if you are starting your starter (as opposed to feeding it) then honey (though not sugar) could be a good idea in the first day or two as it honey often has yeast/bacteria that can help establish your colony (raw honey would be best for this). Similarly, fresh pineapple juice and probiotic yogurt attempt to do similar things by "seeding" the ...


2

Your freezer causes this, as your experiment has shown. Freezers don't magically cool down their contents, like ovens have a heat source, freezers have a "cold source", so in your case the back cools / freezes first, encouraging condensation and subsequently the formation of ice crystals on the colder parts. If your freezer has an auto-defrost cycle, this ...


2

I would leave out the bread improver, the olive oil, and the milk (use water) and see what happens. Both the bread improver and the fat make softer bread. If this is not sufficient and/or you really insist on resilient bread, the next steps are look at the gluten content of your flour and use a higher gluten content if yours is low. American bread uses ...


1

Bread is given structure by gluten strands which stretch out and interlock. This is done mechanically by kneading and through the action of yeast, with yeast action being more important. If gluten is not well developed enough then you get a weak structure which can expand too much, if it is too developed then you get a tough bread. I think what is ...


1

I have been baking with honey and molasses for some time now and I see no much differences except that dough and bread gets much dark brown colour.


1

Some formulations of dextrins can extend shelf life, though that's only kind-of-sort-of a sugar solution. One example is MoisturLok, which is primarily aimed at preventing staling, but its ability to reduce available water also lowers microbial counts on baked goods over a few days.



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