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4

Yes, they are safe. The reason why warming up is recommended is simply taste and texture: When cool, they are more rigid, dry and crumbly, warmed up they become soft and more pleasant to eat. So if you are just hungry, start nibbling. Regarding the food safety aspects: Warming up will in no case make unsafe food safe, see our generic post (about meat) why ...


3

Since a starter is actually a symbiotic mixture of microorganisms, factors like hydration level can change the balance of bacteria and yeasts. Depending on which organisms are favored, it can change the flavor, gas production, etc. They're not necessarily "benefits", but different consistencies can definitely produce different starters. The biggest and most ...


3

The main problem I see is humidity - the bench flour can be lumpy, have bits of dough in it and will be partly moist. I would therefore not put it back in the main bag of flour. If you use it like flour, it might leave dry lumps, so it depends on your technique whether it will work or not. But there are techniques in bread baking that use leftover dough or ...


3

A vast array of surfaces exist but most people end up with either butcher block, stainless steel, or a natural stone such as marble. People choose stainless steel for its ease of cleaning and it's sanitary properties. People choose natural stone because it is typically colder (great for pastries), dough tends not to stick to it, and it looks great. People ...


2

I use a silpat sheet (silicone with some sort of fiber reinforcement in it). As it's silicone on both sides, it grips the countertop well, but the bread dough doesn't stick to it too much. The only drawback is that you don't want to use metal tools with it, as you might damage the surface. (I avoid bench scrapers, and definitely no cutting on it) I don't ...


2

Much of bread baking is not about surface but technique. A good surface is an asset but it's really convenience. When I am working with wet dough I don't even try to stop it sticking, I use the stickiness to stretch the dough. I find that I get very fast, good quality gluten development in about half the time as traditional kneading. I use a dough scraper to ...


2

There's no reason to use a cutting board for making bread, in fact I would recommend against it. Cutting boards are not big enough for good kneading and they slide around. You are better off using a large flat surface which won't move around. As for what that surface is it doesn't matter much as long as it is clean and doesn't have materials which may come ...


2

I am new to this "baking hobby using a bread maker". I have faced the same challenge, and at this very moment am experimenting to find the best "trick" to avoid having unsightly impressions created by the machine paddlers; therefore, I would like to share with you what I have "come to know" basically through experimenting, and some confirmed through readings:...


1

Much of it has to do with how you store it, and what the issues are in your area with that storage method in the given season (is it going to go stale before it goes moldy?) I find that the bread that's least likely to go off before I get to the end of the loaf is sourdough ... but I get my sourdough from a place that uses a real starter, and isn't just ...


1

I've cooked bread on the stove many times. My setup was a cast iron pan with a metal trivet inside and a small pot inside that, which is what the bread dough was placed in. I then had an old rice cooker pot inverted over the pan. That essentially created a small stovetop oven. The small pot was on the trivet so the pot didn't get direct heat from the cast ...


1

I put milk in yeast bread some of the time because it results in different taste and texture than using water. Nothing to do with critters, which will almost all be yeast from the yeast (and their great-grand-yeasts), rather than anything specific to the milk.


1

The question is tough to answer in general for all possible bread types. For most of the answer, I'm going to assume we're talking at least about a yeasted wheat-based bread, formed into something resembling some standard European-style loaf type. What would be the difference between a bread dough that had a sufficient water component, vs a bread ...


1

Notes from Elizabethan England suggests wrapping the loaf in a cabbage leaf! Will try it along with heat on the lid. Don't know if it will flavour it?


1

when making bread we also add fat after mixing all the other ingredients. fat or butter is added later because it can hinder water absorption if added with the other ingredients at the beginning.



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