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5

Perhaps some baker's math is in order to understand what's happening here and what direction your fix should be aiming at: Original recipe: 4c flour -> 500g 2c water -> 480g This means your recipe has a hydration1 of 96%, which is really high, even for ciabatta. It's doable, though, as for example this post cofirms. (Typical values for ciabatta are ...


5

Your recipe should call for the dough to be folded a few times during proving. Do this on a thick bed of flour, and sprinkle more flour on top as you fold, and you'll find it will come together more and more with each fold. Remember, when it comes to bread, the wetter the better!


4

The bread gets crispy and "stiff" because it dries up completely. A good toaster should toast a slice of bread quickly so that the exterior is toasted and the interior barely hot; a bad toaster will not be warm enough and will dry up the slice of bread. Same thing when you do an oven baked sandwich, it should be done on high heat so that the bread toasts ...


4

Wrap the sandwich in foil before baking so the moisture stays in the bread. That will prevent it crisping up.


2

You are spot-on: Whole-grain recipes often use more water and tend to "flow", so using a loaf pan is typically the way to go. Loaf pans alow for a "wetter" dough. It is absolutely possible to bake a free-form whole-wheat loaf, but it needs experience with kneading, resting time and shaping to balance the water content and comparatively low gluten. Also, ...


2

I understand both types of garlic bagels: The garlic on the outside is the fast food version and the garlic on the inside is roasted garlic that dissolves into the dough (the later being the original garlic bagels that were in the deli's before bagels became mainstream). To make the fast food version use the dried granulated garlic - and you need bagel ...


2

Secret to good turkish bread. Do not fully develop dough during mixing. High hydration 60-70% Long rest with gentle stretch and fold sequence. Brush with egg wash just before baking or spray with water until moist. Seeds are optional but nigella seed is what gives the distinctive flavor. Bake at 250deg c for 7-9 mins if you want soft crust; 13-15 mins ...


1

In winter when the sun is not too hot, I put the bowl of dough into a glass fish tank which is in the sun. The temperature sits on about 35C (measured with old vacola thermomter).


1

According to comments I found on the internet about diabetics discussing this same question using this same model, one person recommended this: I changed the crust selection to light and reduced the flour by a tablespoon and the problem was solved. You don't really need a recipe specific for this exact model, here is a low carb bread recipe designed ...


1

Two thoughts: First, baking powders are typically double-acting leaveners, where gas is created in two phases: (1) when mixed with wet ingredients, and (2) when heated. By you mixing the baking powder early, it had more time during this first phase, thus giving your bread more rise before it went in the oven. Second, as @Joe described, the cracking ...



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