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8

In general, unless the book or recipe specifically states something different, "salt" is assumed to mean "table salt". If a recipe were to call for kosher salt or pretzel salt (like as a topping for the loaves) it would specifically call that out especially.


4

You are overproofing your dough. 2 teaspoons dry yeast, 600g flour and a warm rest of twelve hours sounds like a recipe for disaster to me - not to mention that half of the liquid is milk, which would warrant a closer look into food safety topics as well. Also, any extended kneading (if used) is usually prior to bulk fermentation, possibly with an autolyse ...


4

Salt will kill yeast if directly exposed; furthermore it will have an effect on the texture as well as significantly altering the taste. Just remember that if you are baking your own bread the amount of sodium is significantly reduced compared to commercial products (Most of the bread recipes I've used have very little salt in them anyway) and you may find ...


3

Yes, quick yeast and instant yeast are the same thing. It doesn't have to be proofed in warm water before being mixed into the dough. SAF instant yeast is a good product, so personally, I wouldn't spend so much more for a specialty brand. Both brands contain yeast and an emulsifier, and SAF also contains ascorbic acid (which acts as a dough conditioner). ...


3

It is entirely possible. You leave out the salt and that's it, no other changes needed. The preference for salt in bread is learned, at first it can be weird to get accustomed to it, but as time passes, you will find yourself being unpleasantly surprised when you happen to eat salted bread. Salt does have effects beside those on the bread tasting salty, ...


2

I have been successfully making yeast bread without salt for more than 3 decades. There's really no particular difficulty in doing so. If you are habituated to excessive salt levels, as in virtually all commercial processed foods, I suppose you might find that it tastes funny, but if you stop eating too much salt for a couple of weeks you'll discover that ...


2

In my experience, the two things you can do to most improve the crumb of your bread are: Autolyse - Basically this means that once you combine your flour and water, let the dough sit for awhile (I usually autolyse for 20-30 minutes). This allows the flour to more completely absorb the water, and results in a more extensible dough. Some say that ...


2

Sometimes the presence of insects in certain foods cannot be avoided. The FDA has regulations on this, but I couldn't find any specific references to bread per se. However, based on standards for some other foods in there, two flies probably aren't a big issue. At the same time, flies are well known for spreading bacteria harmful to humans all over the ...


1

Unfortunately, your link does not seem to be working for me right now, but assuming you are making a leavened bread dough, here's some tips. Let me know if you've tried all these before. Wet your hands before handling the dough. This will temporarily keep the dough from sticking to your hands but be warned: this effect will not last forever. Make sure to ...


1

400g liquids to 600g flour means a hydration of 67%, which is rather high. Not too high by any means, but high enough that the dough will inevitably be rather sticky. But the main culprit is what Stephie indicated - letting the dough rise for 12 hours in such a warm environment (30°C) is much more than necessary, and will result in the gluten starting to ...


1

I am still very much an amateur in this area, however my current mental model is that the way to develop more flavor is by slowly cultivating many generations of yeast. So, the potential problem with letting your young yeast get all the sugar all at once, is that you greatly reduce both the time and the number of generations. One option is let your yeast ...


1

Make sourdough. Ferment longer. Background For those unfamiliar with the glycemic index: Foods with a higher value are more likely to cause spikes in blood sugar. On a scale from 0-100, foods like potatoes with a value of 70 or greater have a high glycemic index, while foods like peas and garlic, with a value of 55 or less, have a low glycemic index. There’...


1

My mother is the founder of the Glycemic Index Foundation of South Africa (http://www.gifoundation.com/), so let's see how well I've been listening to her! Stephie is right, legume flours do lower the GI. Beans contain slow release carbohydrates which lowers the GI. Chickpea flour is the best to use here. I find you cannot sub more than 1/4 of the total ...


1

Convenience and longer term storage, plus a closer to freshly baked result compared to a pre baked item that has or is going stale to some degree,


1

My last breads suffer from B.Subtilis ssp. mesentericus infection - the bread became sticky in hours and apparently ill. Bacillus mesentericus is a spore forming bacteria, known for causing rope/ropey like bread. It's a soil/grass based bacteria so may have been in the flour. I threw away all the disposable utensils and washed the whole kitchen with ...


1

Damper can be made without yeast. It was and still is the food source of travelling stockman and drovers in Australia, and it rises as much as normal bread. Try searching for a damper recipe as an alternative.



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