Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I have been baking no-knead bread in a heavy porcelain 2-qt.soufflé dish with a glass lid with great success and consistent crust on all sides. I preheat the oven, pot, and lid at 550 degrees for half an hour and then pour the bubbly, risen dough into the pot. The nearly-liquid dough sizzles as it hits the pot. I reduce the oven temperature to 475 and bake ...


0

I prefer not to introduce plastic into my baking where feasible. I spend time and money and love on baking, using nice organic flours and all natural ingedients, and the plastic shower cap, although very effective, makes me think there are unhealthy hydrocarbons dripping on to the lovely dough. I vote for clean white flour sack lint free tea towels, dampened ...


0

In theory, you should always clean your bannetons very meticulously. The main steps (as I was taught from a bunch of very experienced old ladies) would be: Knock them upside-down on your workbench two or three times to let loose material fall out. Take a stiff-bristled brush and scrub along the ridges to loosen stuck flour. Work carefully but firmly to get ...


2

The problem is that the dough is so moist on most no-knead breads, that the weight of the bread itself will crush down, leading to a difference in texture between the top and bottom of the loaf. I suspect that's the reason that they often tell you to bake them in a pre-heated cast iron pot -- so that the bottom will set before the warmth of the oven causes ...


2

The answer is mostly just "it's tradition", as with most questions like this. I do think the pattern you've described isn't quite the actual one. What really happens is that we tend to eat peanut butter and jelly on sandwiches, and put one or the other on single slices of bread, because with a sandwich you can spread one thing on each half and put them ...


1

The only "loaf pan with a lid" I'm familiar with is the "Pullman" pan. I have seen suggestions to use a board wrapped in foil or foil under a casserole dish set on top of a regular loaf pan if trying to emulate that form without the right pan. Foil alone would probably not hold. I don't own one and have never emulated it. I suppose if someone was using a ...


1

There's only onw way that I know to tell the two apart without using it: granule size Instant is (typically?) smaller than (most?) active dry yeast. However, unless you have a magnifying glass, and maybe some source of yeast for a comparison, it's going to be very, very difficult to tell them apart. I don't know how much granule size is a function of ...


2

You can't really tell by looking, at least not without a known sample of the same brand. The good news is that they are usually interchangeable 1:1. Make a recipe you know well. Does it rise as you expect? Or does it take more or less time? That will most likely give you your answer. If the dough behaves as usual, it's a good bet that you have what you ...


5

The difference between gluten and gliadin is the one already explained in your question: Gliadin is a precursor to gluten. You could say that gliadin is to gluten what grains are to porridge. Gluten is the result of glutenin reacting with gliadin in the presence of water, just like porridge is the result of grains "reacting" with milk in the presence of ...


0

Bread making means that you are tending a culture of live yeasts - and, in sourdough, also bacteria. Just like the lizard in a terrarium, they thrive best when given optimal temperature, humidity and food. Your dough already takes care of the food and pH of the environment, but if you want your bread to rise either with a given speed (to fit your schedule) ...


0

The bread proofer machine serves mainly one purpose: Keeping a choosen temperature. This comes to play whenever you want to let yeast grow and multiply. Yeast can develop at very different temperature ranges, from fridge to warm room. But "cosy & warm" is usually the temperature where it's most active. The most obvious use is: proofing dough, both ...


0

After reading some papers on this I experimented by adding the yeast 5 minutes before the kneading ends. This gave an acceptable loaf without any collapsing but did not even get a big convex bulge. The rationale behind this is that fresh yeast is already active and the 20 minutes of kneading already uses up its potential partially adding it later saves 15 ...


0

I've just been fiddling with sourdough again after a long hiatus, and a lot of prior experience of not very sour sourdough. Have not read the book in question, so I can't say one way or another on their method. From what I understand, most of the sour is from lactic acid bacteria, and those are found naturally on the hulls of whole grain - so whole wheat ...


0

Bake longer. If the outside is getting overdone when you bake longer, bake longer at a lower temperature (usually first 10-15 minutes hottest for maximum spring, then turn down as needed so the inside is done without the outside being burnt.) Perhaps 350F for 15 min and then 325 for an additional hour and 15 (90 total), if the top is as black as it seems ...


-1

The key to success in using a bread machine is to follow the directions. When you feel a need to not do that, the key to success is not to use a bread machine, which has a rigid, pre-programmed cycle that depends on you following its directions. It's a robot that has a fairly limited scope of operations and depends on you doing your part to help it work ...


1

Putting it in the fridge probably didn't help matters any. If you had left it on the counter overnight it would probably have gotten its act in gear without further help. Yeast works slower when cool than when warm, but it does work, given time. IMPE, dry packet yeast going bad is somewhere between rare and unheard of - unless it's stored somewhere that is ...


1

I can think of one case where yeast doughs shouldn't suffer from mechanical mixing: If you're going to be rolling out the dough (eg, for filling & making dumpling-like products, or rolling balls for monkey bread), you'd normally end up compressing the air bubbles when rolling it. Mechanical mixing has the same problem, so the difference between ...


1

As explained in my older answer Joe linked in a comment, the purpose of stretch and fold is to align the gluten sheets, producing the typical structure of kneaded bread. Depending on your final shaping, you end up with either a sheetlike structure (e.g. in ciabatta) or with spirals/threads in kozunak and other braided breads. One reason to not do the ...


3

They make whole wheat flour, but their bread flour is definitely refined; it does not contain bran or germ. Their bread flour is milled from a specific hard red spring wheat from North and South Dakota. That particular wheat is higher in protein than the wheat and wheat blends of other brands of bread flour. KA's whole wheat flour (not the white whole ...


1

Experiment more. I'm not a slavish recipe-follower, and while I have the occasional brick when I screw up badly, I have yet to make actually inedible bread in several decades of playing fast and loose with bread recipes. Loaves that were not what I wanted, which I avoided repeating, yes. So bad it went in the garbage rather than be eaten, no. I would ...


0

Having made everything without "benefit" of a dough hook for years before getting a Kitchen-Aid (which is no Hobart, dough-hook-wise) I'd say it suits everything. I have done all the items mentioned except "hamburger buns" (thick slice of homemade bread and I'm done, there.) On a longer view, I'd suppose there's a few thousand years of baking before the ...


2

I have several bannetons (also called brotforms). Two are wicker and 2 are cane (you can also find them made from wood pulp). I simply use a small, stiff pastry brush to clean away any flour left behind. Sometimes I find it helpful to leave it out overnight so the flour dries and it is easier to brush away. I have even given the canes a quick rinse but I ...


0

I gently tap, so it doesn't get all over the cupboard, and just leave it.


0

I feed sourdough starter with strong white bread flour mixed with water to make a sloppy dough. This is a common method in the UK and it seems to work well.


3

The vibrations will have an effect: On you, because it will be harder to judge the "ripeness" of your refreshed sourdough. You often want to catch the point "just before its starts to go down again" - which will be hard to do when the shaking machine bursts the bubbles all the time. I doubt that the yeasts and bacteria in the starter will mind - they ...


1

As Catija has mentioned, the yeast in beer is dead and typically filtered out. There does exist a class of recipes that are 'beer breads', in which you add beer or similar bubbly beverage ... but they're quick breads, not yeast breads. Unlike using sparkling water in tempura, or beer cider in a beer batter, where you rely on the trapped bubbles to give the ...


2

I don't believe you would want to try to leaven bread with beer only, though you could certainly use it as a flavoring. First, the amount of yeast still present in a brewed batch of beer is very low. Beers that have been bottle carbonated (or bottle conditioned) will have more than others but, particularly with high gravity beers (beers with a lot of ...


0

If you want to keep the crust of hotdog or hamburger buns "soft," after the last rising - and before the baking - brush the top with melted butter. Just make sure the butter isn't too hot or you'll deflate the dough. Bake them at 350 deg. for approximately 20 minutes and give them another brushing of butter on all surfaces. Also, don't forget to use milk ...


0

There is no short or easy answer to this. In short, the main factors are: The right flour and balance between water and flour - depends greatly on flour quality. The right kneading. The right handling of the wet dough. The right baking. You can read a detailed description of my efforts here (including pictures and videos): ...


0

There is no short or easy answer to this. I spent around 15 years learning to master this. In short, the main factors are: The right flour and balance between water and flour - depends greatly on flour quality. The right kneading - enough to make the gluten into an elastic structure with long threads, but not too much as it will break the structure. The ...


2

It's any loaf with a crispy crust. There's not much more to it than that. If you can't find sourdough or Vienna, just use a standard white loaf with a crisp crust.


1

I too have found that adding liquid gradually eases problem, but does not eliminate it. The dough does not get tossed around in bottom of bowl by the hook as it should, but clings to hook and only minimal kneading is happening. The issue is the bowl not being wider, and so the hook also needs to be slim elongated and screw like, not wide and to side of ...


3

One cause of gumminess in 100% rye breads is excessive starch degradation related to amylase enzyme actions. Amylase action is slowed down by increasing acidity. You can increase the acidity by adding a small amount of lemon juice or cream of tartar to your dough as described here. In his books "Whole Grain Breads" and "Crust and Crumb", Peter Reinhart ...


1

What you are describing is the result of 'oven spring'. When a properly proofed piece of dough is placed in a hot oven it will begin to expand or spring. If the the oven is dry or the skin is not sliced it will set rather quickly, resulting in cracks. There are two things that affect how quickly the skin sets: Steam Slicing the skin Steam allows the ...


3

Disclaimer: I'm not too familiar with the english technical terms, but I'll try and explain what's happening without them. Watch a shaped bread during the final rise: Right after shaping, the interior is still dense because the co2 bubbles from the yeast haven't developed yet. The surface is firm and the shape round(-ish), if you poke gently with a ...


1

If you increase the volume of a closed container which can't expand anymore, it will cause the container to break because there is no more space to expand unless the container gives way. This is what happens with bread. The top becomes fixed in shape as it looses moisture and looses its ability to expand. When the inside part expands, the lack of space will ...


3

The crown is the first thing that sets when you put the bread in the oven. Then, as the center of the loaf heats up, it rises and cracks the top, which has already set. I don't think you can prevent it completely, unless you change your recipe to a denser kind of bread that doesn't rise very much while baking. Otherwise, I find that you can minimise cracking ...


1

What a lot of these instructions for starting a sourdough starter don't say is that you can start your starter using, say, a teaspoon of flour and a teaspoon of water. Then the next time you add flour and water, you add 2 teaspoons of each. And increase it from there. You do NOT need to start with a cup of flour and a cup of water. My goodness, that's so ...


0

Our over-the-range microwave warms up nicely when the hood light (underneath) is turned on. This may still get too warm but requires monitoring at 20 minute intervals, where the microwave heating/over-heating happens in seconds. The light in the conventional baking oven will provide the same gentle heat. Either way I would try to keep the temp under 95F ...


0

I have been using a Tramontina Triply DO (stainless/aluminum/stainless sandwich). This is a fairly substantial construction but no where near cast iron thickness. The lid is single layer stainless and the handles are solid stainless. Plastic handles will suffer in a 450 to 500 oven. I always preheat the oven, but have tried both a hot and a cold start for ...


-1

Any chance there's a lot of noise in your kitchen? Maybe urban legend or not but I know every time my mom's made yorkshire pudding we have to be queit otherwise they won't rise properly. I also strongly agree with the gluten differential - gluten brownies compared to gluten free brownies have a completely different texture and 'springiness'


2

I would check your oven temperature to be sure it's actually right, and also I'm wondering if you're over-proofing your dough, which could possibly result in it deflating when it goes into the oven, or at the very least result in a lackluster rise.


1

The best way is to par bake the bread (until it's solid but not browned - about 50% of the cooking time) then freeze. If you let the par baked bread cool to room temperature and then freeze it unwrapped until it is hard. Once it's frozen wrap it in cling film (plastic wrap) and aluminium foil


3

If you were going to take the refrigerator approach, it's important to consider when you want to refridgerate it. Immediately after making the dough, stash two of the doughballs in the fridge. Take the first one out after about 25-30 minutes, and the second one out after another 25-30 minutes. This should give you roughly a 30 minute difference between ...


3

The most straightforward approach (especially if you're letting a stand mixer or similar do the work) is to just make three batches, starting the 2nd batch half an hour later than the first, and the third an hour in. Then they should more or less become ready as you're ready to put them in the oven. Upside, it will work exactly as you're used to. Downside, ...


2

There are a couple of things you can try to encourage large irregular bubbles. Let your dough rise longer. A longer proofing period will yield larger bubbles. There is a limit to this though (about 18-24 hrs) because the yeast will eventually fizzle out. Handle the dough gently. Punching down the dough acts to homogenize the bubble size, so you'll want to ...


3

In order to get large bubbles like you see in a Ciabatta you want to knead your bread as little as possible. Literally I mean knead it till just smooth but no longer. You really don't want to stretch any of the gluten. The more you stretch it the stronger it gets which is not what you want when trying to create nice UN-even air pockets. On top of this, you ...


0

There is an easy method which works well for rye flour. Use fine rye flour not wholegrain. Take 100 g rye flour and add 100 g water at 40° C. Mix it, put the mixture in a bowl and cover with plastic foil. After 48 hours add the same ingredients with the same amounts again. Cover again. Let it rest for 24 hours. Then add 200 g rye flour and 200 g water at ...


1

My experience when using any starter is that the portion you "throw away" is supposed to be used in your next loaf of bread as a "poolish" or "biga". The portion of your starter that you keep gets more water and flour to nourish the next generation(s) of your starter. As mentioned in the other answer, the amount of starter that is kept each time is ...


6

I just asked the exact same question here!: Why throw away so much sourdough starter? Tartine Book no. 3 I found a pretty good answer online. It actually would be easier and cheaper for you to throw it out, as you don't have to buy as much organic flour in the future to feed your starter. Imagine buying 5 cups each day to feed your starter when you could ...



Top 50 recent answers are included