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Butter contains salt and some protein, this is eliminated by melting butter very slowly and scooping the solids from the surface. It becomes usable where Ghee lard or fat is required,


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No, shortening is a solid fat. This means you have to substitute another solid fat, else the recipe won't work. So, use the butter as it is. You probably will have to bring the butter to room temperature to be workable (shortening hardens less in the fridge). Don't use the microwave, it will produce melted spots. Leave it out overnight or longer, or, in ...


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First use 50% white Flour and 50% dark flour. This will help allready to make it last at least a couple of days longer then plain white flour. Also make sure you use Type 00 flour. This also is better to use and last longer. Now it can stay at least a week in very good eatable condition. Using olive oil in stead of butter, and changing sugar into honey, will ...


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If you add yeast in water warmer than 40 Celsius, you will kill the yeast and prevent rising. Usually 2 rising is enough, else the yeast will be exhausted before you bake it. I would follow this order: Knead, rise, knead, rise in baking vessel and bake.


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As a home baker of "artisan" bread, I'm constantly looking for ways to improve crust and crumb. Which has lead me to research quite a few things. In addition, my son was a supermarket bread baker, so I gave him a call. Here's his feedback...(he does not think very highly of the product) The dough comes frozen to the store. It is thawed and then the bread ...


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I don't know much of the science behind the super-soft bread on supermarket shelves, but I can give some insight into the history that led to it becoming so ubiquitous in the US. The idea that whiter breads are classier than darker breads goes all the way back to the 5th century BC. The belief that white bread was superior to dark bread, a common theme ...


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When you talk about bread in (plastic)bags: The bread often will be wrapped by the manufacturer before it's cold(they do it to save time and storage-capacity, so it's cheaper). When it happens(when the bread is really fresh you may notice water-drops inside the packaging) there will be a high humidity inside. The humidity will soften the crust and force ...


1

I use this pizza dough yeast all the time and everyone loves it. The trick I use is I let the dough rise for about 30 mins then I punch it down and shape it into a ball again and let it rise for another 30 mins. And then it becomes soft and sketchy. And the recipe says on their website that if you are going to use whole wheat flour only use a 1/2 cup or so. ...


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It sounds like you may be missing a very important piece. this belongs here:


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As mentioned in the comments, start with a short hot soak (the hotter the water, the better, even boiling water poured into the sink is great for this). Remove the pan from the still hot water and scrub off all of the stuck-on stuff that you can using a nylon brush or a scrubby sponge . Repeat with fresh hot water as necessary until all of the big stuck-on ...


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Get it nice and hot, nearly red hot, the stuck things will seperate and then knock it a bit to loosen anything left. But for safety, use tongs and oven mits/kitchen towels to handle it while it's hot and make sure you have some place to put it when you take it off the burner, like the sink or ceramic/stone surface, that won't melt or scorch. And as Jolene ...


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Have you tried using gram or chickpea flour? You can get it at an Indian grocer. For pita, you could sub 50% or more of the regular flour and get a similar result. Its easy to work. For leavened doughs I would start with a 25% substitution and see how much more you could stretch it in future attempts. I've made chapati, tortillas and bread with chickpea ...


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Personally, I always use whole eggs combined with a small amount of water and salt. You should tailor your wash to what you are doing though. Generally dairy will dull your shine (and the richer the dairy, the darker the color), whole eggs give a golden color, whites give a clear shine, and yolks will give a deep reddish brown. A bit of salt will help to ...


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I have always used egg and milk. Two thirds egg to one third milk. Use a spray bottle to ensure that you get a nice, even coverage. Also make sure that you have a full proof on your goods, because (obviously) anything that gets exposed to the heat due to oven spring will not have color. Just the way I have always done things (and I used to work in some ...


3

Active dry yeast and instant yeast are pretty much interchangeable in recipes (although instant may have somewhat more activity that an equal amount of active dry) However, your recipe calls for fresh yeast. The general rule of thumb (referenced here) is to divide the amount of fresh yeast by 3 to convert to active dry or instant yeast. Your recipe would ...


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I found this, it's Ask.com so even though I'm posting it as an answer, I don't consider it the answer. I'd still love to hear what some of the expert bakers here have to say. (emphasis mine) As you begin to bake different types of breads, you will come across some older bread recipes that call for potato water. Potato water is the water that potatoes ...


2

Baking soda can be added to bread that uses a starter in order to get a faster rise, and it will slightly offset the sourness. Usually this is done by mixing a fairly wet sponge with the starter, water, and flour, then adding the soda and salt to the final flour and mixing it in. The soda will begin to react pretty quickly, frequently allowing you to bake ...


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Our last 3 pullman loaves were like this as well, oozing out of the pan. I think it was a combo of a warmer day, letting it rise too long in the pan before closing the lid. I suggest less rise time and a tad less water.


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Maybe you were distracted while mixing the ingredients and ended up proofing the yeast. To proof your yeast, you'd mix the warmed water with the yeast and sugar (honey in your case), then let it sit for up to ten minutes or so before mixing it with the other ingredients. The yeast should begin forming a head of foam on top of the water. Historically, this ...


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I added baking soda to the final rise of my slightly-overmatured-starter baguettes today. The flavour was fine, not sure if that's because the starter wasn't that sour or because of the baking soda. It didn't seem to have many adverse effects on the flavour anyway, so I would encourage anyone considering this method to try it. One thing: Adding during ...


1

There are three factors that will make dough rise more quickly: 1- More water 2- More yeast 3- More heat from any source More yeast will make the bread rise more quickly but won't create the sticky texture and better flavor that you describe. More heat will be the same, not just from your heated water but also the temperature of the room- it would ...


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Your use of "bread/buns" in your question makes me wonder if you are aiming for a large international burger chain style of bun. If so I think you might need a flour closer to cake flour, rather than bread flour. It's also possible they are using some rising agents other than yeast. ie baking powder to get those tiny bubbles. If you just want soft bread, ...


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I think adding the butter twice could maybe account for it. extra hydration, then collapse. That seems like quite a bit of fat already. (just based on what I've done myself) If the dough is normally close to being over hydrated, when it gets too close to the stage where it collapses, a tiny bit more liquid can tip it over the edge. Maybe even an unusually ...


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Bread machines require higher protein flour for good results. You noticed this when you switched from AP to bread flour. Whole wheat flour typically has less available gluten that white bread flour. It also has all the bran that can make a loaf feel heavier- but gives it all that nutty flavor. You can mix some wheat flour into bread flour to get the flavor ...


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Bread flour has more gluten, which is a protein that makes bread stretchy and less crumbly when the dough is prepared right. There is plenty of whole wheat bread flour out there, and you can often get mixes which are specifically made for bread machines, I'd start with those and see how you go. If you cannot find them in your local store you might be able to ...


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I tried it and I agree with Jefromi, it was not good. I had thought maybe it was because I used a whole wheat flour whereas I usually use unbleached all purpose flour, or maybe the recipe itself (because I used their recipe instead of the one I usually use) After reading his comment, it must have been the yeast. Now Im stuck with two more packets that I have ...



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