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0

I don't know anything about baking bread but maybe take into account how cold the dutch oven is if you don't pre heat the oven. The temp of your cast iron will be very different if you take into account room temp of your kitchen. Say, Miami verses coastal Northern California.


2

There are no substitutes for yeast. What you list are not substitutes, but alternative leaveners: either actual baking powder, or a combination of baking soda and lemon juice or yogurt. The milk does not contribute to leavening at all. There is nothing you can do to mimic ordinary yeast or sourdough (which consists mostly of wild yeasts). If you were to ...


0

Because some times it my get hard in a cabinet if the bag is open and you will half to put it in the freezer and let it get cold for like five or six minutes hang take it out and put it in the refrigerator


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The likely culprit, so to speak, is not just the freezer but rather the mill of the bag within which the bread now comes. Any relatively thin sheet of plastic is actually porous at the microscopic level. That's why you can smell right through some of these bags and detect what's in them, or detect the poor or better condition that their contents are in. Who ...


1

I think there's lots of things at play in your situation. Bread has many variables ("degrees of freedom"), and this is part of the reason that bread is so fun and so diverse (and so fun)! Experimentation is warranted here, I think. There's many sourdough enthusiasts around here, so you'll probably get many different opinions. Take the suggestions you like ...


0

The alcohol was not a problem in my case. I want to clarify that my sourdough was not producing any liquid in any visible quantity, the alcoholic smell started to fade as soon as I leaved the container opened for a about a day . I have also used the very same sourdough, without refreshing it in the meantime, for my latest baked goods and it's active and ...


1

Most likely, the yeast in your starter are getting tired and/or hungry. A starter will start developing a strong alcohol smell and start "leaking" a dark fluid once the yeast start running out of food. This happens to me if I neglect my starter for over 2 weeks or so. I would recommend keeping your starter in the refrigerator, not at room temperature. You ...


2

If you've truly gone anaerobic and the smell is off, you are growing things other than the intended cultures... As a rule, I simply feed mine flour and water. No sugar. The cultures can get along fine with the flour. (I did read in a reputable baking book about adding leftover water from boiling potatoes, for the starches, but I haven't had a chance to ...


1

Still Tasty recommends 1-2 days fridged, 2-3 months frozen. The main problem with storing yeast dough in the fridge is that it will continue to rise ... possibly escaping whtever container you may put it into. If I try to refrigerate a normal bread dough, I'll put it in an oiled container at least 3 times the size of the dough, oil the top of the dough, ...


1

Im a little late on this debate. However, my husband tells me that his grandmother used to make her bread starter with potato peel and lemon juice. Once started, this culture used to sit in a warm place and be fed sugar and probably flour regularly. Bread was made each day for the family. How are you going 3 years on with your experiment. I'm interested ...


3

Cast iron is ideal, but any pot that can take the heat and has a tight lid will work. Like @talon8 said in his comment, it doesn't even have to be metal. This article from Around the World in 80 Bakes specifically uses terracotta for sourdough, not cast iron. Just as an FYI, this related question deals with preheating (for no-knead bread, not sourdough), ...


2

As Eric Hu said in a previous answer, oil reduces the formation of gluten, therefore affecting the elasticity of the dough. From the chemical and physical point of view, without altering other variables (yeast, rising time, salt, amount of liquid,etc) a dough with less or no oil will me more elastic, allowing bigger bubbles and giving the bread a chewier ...


9

To make your own part-baked rolls, you have to actually part-bake them, not just freeze the shaped dough. You can freeze shaped dough, but you then need to fully thaw it and let it 'wake up' again before baking. You need to part bake at a relatively low temperature so that the dough springs and sets, but a crust does not form. About 20 minutes at ...


0

As a starter, Hardees lists the ingredients for their Soft Baked Buns on their website. From there, we can gain that the main ingredients are: All Purpose White Flour Water Sugar Soybean Oil Yeast Additionally, it contains less than 2% of: Wheat Gluten Salt Maltodextrin Food Starch-Modified DATEM Xanthan Gum Whey Dextrin Mixed Triglycerides Enzymes ...


1

Those are larvae of the Larder beetle, related to carpet beetles. Vacuum up all the crumbs and keep the area clean. They infest many dry foods and areas where food debris collects.


0

Oh man that looks eerily similar to carpet beetle larvae. I've had a bad run-in with them before where they had infested one of our bedrooms at one point. Here's an image of the larvae: source Are these larvae still alive? I would suggest checking your home to ensure they haven't infested it, as I have a feeling they would do poorly in a factory or even ...


11

Ciabatta should be crusty, with a chewy crumb and big air pockets. Neither "dry" nor "dense" would be adjectives one would associate with good ciabatta. This is what good ciabatta should look like: Source: Michael Ruhlman (highly respected recipe and author) Sometimes the loaves may be flatter, but the chewiness, big air pockets, and crustiness are what ...


0

I often find the easiest way to replace eggs is finding recipes that don't use eggs in the first place. As you specifically ask about Swiss Züpfe (or Zopf, as it is also called), this recipe here Butterzopf klassisch (Bärner Ankezüpfe) and this one here Sonntagszopf use eggs only for the egg wash, but not in the dough, and you should be able to get away by ...


2

I've successfully used flax seed as an egg replacer in my sandwich bread. 1Tbs ground flaxseed mixed with 3Tbs water (per egg), mix & let sit 5 minutes before adding to recipe. Flax adds a bit of nutty flavor, but worth a try for your bread.


4

Yes, but the trick is not to have the dough in the microwave when it's on: place the dough into a wide, shallow bowl, and wrap it tightly with plastic wrap. Fill a microwave-safe bowl with water, and float a toothpick or a grain of rice in it. Microwave the water 'til it's boiling. Place the bowl with the dough above the boiling water; the water level ...


3

Impatience is very hard to reconcile with baking bread (or any other fermentation process, for that matter). If it works, it still won't be a good choice. Yeast doesn't like sudden temperature shifts, the gentler the change, the better. So, the warm room will yield the most flavorful bread, and have the least chance of failure. Putting the dough somewhere ...


1

Yes, you can, but you have to take a great deal of care. Use the lowest power setting on your microwave and use short bursts of power rather than nuking it. Source: I happened to see someone do exactly this on TV the other day, and it worked, to my surprise.


0

The big problem is touching the bread with your fingers after it is baked. Your finger will put mold spores on your bread. I have made bread that will last 3 weeks in my tropical climate by the following procedure: Add 1 gram of calcium propionate to one kilo of flour. Your bread might rise a little slower but you can not taste it. When the bread is ...


0

There are many ways to cook naan depending upon the region or area, all are authentic but as far as the addition of egg in naan is irrelevant. People use yogurt, ghee (clarified butter) as well as milk to make soft naan. Yeast and dough starter both are used interchangeably by most of the naan maker.


9

While it might seem like a drastic step to double the amount of egg in your recipe, in fact, you are not adding that much more egg relative to the amounts of your other ingredients. A whole large egg weighs about 50 grams and is roughly 75% water so that extra half egg will contribute just under 20 grams of additional liquid to your recipe - you will need ...


2

It wouldn't do much to it. You are already adding 245g of liquids (I'm counting the butter and water and egg). Doubling the egg adds maybe another 20-25g. You're enriching it a bit more, so slightly heavier dough and slightly slower rising, but it's unlikely it would amount to much. You will probably end up offsetting the additional liquid with a bit more ...


2

Personally butter and oil adds a particular flavor to bread and in fact the bread looks like cake and seems like chocolate cake. When the bread especially the local type called kumba bread that I produced is oiled with enough butter inside before baking, the bread comes out from the oven very bright and having that coffee brown color so attractive to eat.


5

It will even rise (very, very slowly) at refrigeration temperatures (4C, 39F). For it to completely stop rising you need to freeze it (or very close). A lot of recipes call for the dough to rise overnight in the refrigerator. Depending on the dough, it may it may in fact completely rise in the refrigerator overnight. Long rises create more flavor than short ...


2

As it turns out, my dough was very cold. Due dilligence: here's a full answer. One of the requirements of yeast for fermentation is appropriate temperature. Cold dough straight from the fridge won't rise, or it will only rise very slowly. 25-30°C is a recommended temperature range for rising, although cooler temperatures can work. Duh.


1

I'm not sure but I think brown suger can also be used to make a Herman. The Herman dough consists of Lactobacillales and yeast. Both need sugar to live. White refined sugar mostly consists of saccharose (99,96 % saccharose, 0,04 % inverted sugar syrup).1 Brown sugar is nothing else than white sugar mixed with molasses. 2 Therefore I assume that you can use ...


1

Probably not... Though there are plenty of starters that include dairy, instant mashed potatoes, fruits, etc to inoculate or feed the starter; the goal of any starter culture is to grow and maintain a of yeasts that can efficiently and effectively raise bread, normally wheat or rye-based bread. Any ingredient added to a starter other than water and ...



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