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You should not use metal on cast iron or may damage the seasoning. It is best to clean it while still hot with a brush to get into the grooves and never use dish soap. Some coarse salt can help get rid of burnt on areas. Then reheat and coat with a bit of oil to protect the coating/seasoning. Patterned cast iron is difficult to season and may take more time ...


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Guys: As someone who works at Cook's Illustrated should know, one experiment does not make a data set. I was the one who updated our No-Knead recipe, and I can tell you with certainty that the cold Dutch oven/cold start method works just as well as the hot one. I do it all the time. As does Chad Robertson, so it would appear. Here's the deal: oven spring ...


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I did not get an answer from America's Test Kitchen beyond that the written recipe supersedes the video, so I proceeded with the experiment. I made two identical doughs following ATK's recipe for Almost No-Knead Bread with Olives, Rosemary, and Parmesan. Knowing that I would bake them two hours apart, I even started the doughs two hours apart, so the two ...


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I always preheat the oven and Dutch oven for my no-knead bread, but I recently saw this video where Chad Robertson of Tartine skipped preheating the Dutch oven. Chad Robertson Masterclass So, it is definitely possible to skip preheating the Dutch oven. Unfortunately, I don't have more experience or evidence around this topic and don't know the effect of ...


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No, you shouldn't be adding butter at this stage, it will take too much kneading and undo the rising. Whatever it is you were baking, just go ahead and bake it this way. There are many breads which don't use any fat at all. The taste will be different than with butter, but it will still be a good bread.


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I've found that beer in breads (and crusts, to be more specific) gives it a very light, airy quality. I don't know enough to speak authoritatively, but I'd guess the yeast (or whatever) in it helps its levity - which makes it so you don't have to knead it as much. So I don't know for sure - but I'd guess that it has a functional purpose other than just ...


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The purpose of the beer (and the vinegar) in this case is to add some of the malty, fermenty flavors typical of longer-fermented or sourdough breads. You can either leave it out and replace it with an equal quantity of water or use a non-alcoholic beer The carbonation from the beer might add a little extra lift at the start to establish some air cells and ...


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Try placing the buns closer together on a smaller baking tray, this should stop them spreading and force them to rise.


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A higher water and ambient temperature definitely speed up proving and rising. The consequence is poorer flavour and dense bread. Generally the slower the rise the better the bread. If you don't have somewhere cool in the house, try proving at room temperature for, say, 20 mins to get the yeast going, then finishing in the fridge. Or if you can wait, just ...


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First of all, are the ingredient lists the same? Sometimes with packaged foods, there are specific differences in formulas for different product lines. If we assume that the formula is the same, it could have more to do with the consistency of the ingredients. The ones that come in a pan get stored in the right shape and probably don't get handled the same ...


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Bread actually gets stale because it has gotten too moist, not because it's actually dry as common sense would indicate. Put it in the oven at a low temperature for a while and it should be better.


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The trick I learned from my grandfather is harder to do these days because of the prevelance of plastic bags: Heat your oven. Wet down the inside of a paper bag. Place the loaf of bread in the paper bag, and fold it over to seal Place the paper bag in the oven. Extract it before the paper looks like it's getting crispy. As rumtscho mentions in his ...


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While it is never possible to restore bread to its fresh baked glory, toasting can help. The main staling mechanism in bread is the re-crystalization of the formerly gelatinized starches, making the bread seem hard and dry. Toasting heats the bread up, and helps the starches re-gelatinize, and so can help mitigate the staleness, although it is not a ...


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I use the method described in the Tartine cookbooks. I soak 3 dish towels in water and put them in a cookie sheet. As I preheat the oven to 500 degrees they release a lot of steam. And during the first 15 minutes of baking I keep them in the oven. Sometimes adding water. After 15 minutes take them out. This has worked better for me then the spray bottle on ...


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The bakery is probably selling bread produced using the Chorleywood process, which is a high-volume, high-speed process that uses low-protein flours and additional ingredients (emulsifiers, gums, enrichment) to produce bread that is very light and easy to slice compared to home-baked bread. It's challenging to replicate in a home kitchen, and there's good ...


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This could help. It is a nice write up of brioche bun development from Chefsteps: http://www.chefsteps.com/recipe-development/brioche-burger-bun#/brioche-buns-development-brief



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