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i think it is that you are letting the bread touch the sides of the freezer. same thing happens if i let the bread touch the sides of the refrigerator. the whole loaf will be fresh except whatever side was touching the side of the refrigerator. so just store the bread in the middle, with other things on either side, and i bet it fixes the issues. i know this ...


0

The big difference between a sourdough based bread and one made with what you are calling active yeast is the sourdough yeasts are wild and take a while to develop into a starter that is as strong as purchased yeast. The biggest difference is in the flavor and texture of the bread. As I understand a proofer just adds another level of control to the ...


2

Summary: If the loaf is kept at an elevated temperature in a plastic bag for a period of 6-12 hours I believe you will see little to no difference compared to storing at room temperature. Stored at an elevated temperature in a paper bag the loaf will start to dry out to a noticeable extent. Note that the answer below does not address possible food safety ...


2

I have been using a starter I started with a Belgium blonde for some time now. I feed it every twelve hours because it stays out all the time. It has a great funky sour taste. I use it in everything. Never really worried about pH. It bubbles away and raises nice. I do sometimes add yeast though.


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You might try to add some amaranth flour or any other kind of flour, but it's difficult -impossible I think- you can make a bread or a tortilla out of 100% amaranth flour. Wheat flour (that you call "all purpose white flour") contains gluten, that is functionally used to make dough stick together. If you use amaranth, rice or other kinds of flour you'll find ...


1

'Quick cooking' (aka 'instant') oats have been cooked more, and are in smaller pieces than regular (aka. 'old fashioned', aka. 'rolled' oats). If you'd prefer more texture in the bread, go with the old fashioned oats. If you're trying to make them less noticable, go with the quick cooking oats. If you only have one on hand, go with whatever it is that you ...


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Don't keep your bread in the fridge for goodness' sake. You lose a lot of flavor and freshness by doing that. It speeds decomposition of certain aspects of the bread even if it does make it last longer. A bread box is meant to be used to keep bread fresh and great tasting for 3-6 days which is about the longest u can expect fresh bread to last. There is a ...


0

It happens the Maillard reaction, which is a chemical reaction that is responsible for turning baked and roasted food golden brown.


-1

http://www.theslackergourmet.com/2012/11/baking-turning-quick-bread-mix-into.html Well here's a link on how to do so for All the non believers . Hope you enjoy !


12

Leavening is rising by any means, so baking soda and baking powder (chemical leaveners) both apply here, as does yeast (fermentation). Chemical leaveners like baking soda and powder work by mixing an acid (varies, depending on the recipe) and base (usually baking soda in some form) to produce carbon dioxide gas. Fermentation is the process of yeast ...


1

I will, as usual, suggest experimentation. At times, I make bread, knead it, form it, drop in in a pan, let it rise once, and bake it. It's expedient. It's bread, and usually quite decent bread at that. Other times I rise and punch down/re-knead a bit 1, 2 or even 3 times. Other days I make a wet sloppy mess I can't really knead and pour/scape it into ...


2

I have read a lot of theories on this and only one makes sense to me. You knead your dough again to redistribute the yeast in the bread Commercial yeast is very concentrated, and if you don't allow for a second rise, you will have areas with very little yeast development and areas with high concentration of yeast (hence the air bubbles) I should note that ...


2

Good dough is not about being "conditioned". You can use that stuff to get the last 5% of perfection when you have already managed the first 95% with good process and ingredients, but it won't do magic. In this case, you seem to expect whole wheat to act the same way as white flour. This is simply not possible. There is a large chemical difference between ...


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American bread is more bitter than Japanese bread. I think this is caused by the use of baking power or baking soda.


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Of the various things listed when looking up "dough conditioners" the only ones I'd think of using at home would be malted barley flour, lethicin and L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C.) An alternative for what the C is doing (oxidising) would be to buy your flour ahead and age it a few weeks for natural oxidising; possibly keeping it under refrigeration to reduce ...


0

My favorite French toast is with Italian Bread, but not the kind with garlic--that does not sound good at all.


3

French Toast is just French toast because you are soaking it in egg and pan or griddle frying it. You can use white sandwich bread, Italian loaf, French baquette, wheat bread what ever. I think we evolved to this in the French toast category. I don't think the garlic would taste good with the sweet syrup. So yeah Weird. Personal taste though. If its not an ...


0

Get a instant read Probe Thermometer. The probe has a wire connected to it so you can monitor the temp without opening the oven door. Stick the probe in 20 minutes after you put the loaf in. they cost 15 dollars. Bake until center is 210 degrees. Take the guesswork out of it. If you think the top is browning to much cover in with tin foil at the end of the ...


-3

Yeast Dies at 140 Degrees f . Any internal temp past that and you are getting 0 oven spring. The dough you speak of is being punched down and spread out in a pan so the internal temp is going to heat past 140 way faster than a loaf of bread. And yes the solid crust that is formed right away due to lack of oven steam is going to counteract any oven spring. ...


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I know this is an older post but just want to throw my 2 cents in. I was lucky enough to come across 2 new stoneware bread pans (NEW) at a resale shop. I bought them for 10 dollars and they are from the "Sassafras" company. Good pans. I have been seasoning the inside of them with a canola oil spray. They have a real nice patina on them now. I also sprinkle ...


3

This article indicates that the elevated temperature would retard staling, It has been shown that changes in the starch contributes about 93, 50 and 20 percent of the total crumb firmness at 20°C, 30°C and 36°C, respectively, during five days of storage. The results imply that changes in the starch in the crumb are about one-half and one-fourth ...


-2

Use French's NoSalt instead of salt.


1

Here is a link to a page on Ellen's Kitchen with copycat recipes for the rolls from Ryan's, Golden Corral, and Logan's Roadhouse. I have not tried these recipes yet but I found it interesting how different they are.


0

They are just simply yeast rolls that have a little extra sugar for the American palate. Here is a decent base recipe: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/quick-yeast-rolls/ I'd recommend reading the most helpful critical reviews at the bottom because with the tweaks mentioned, they taste amazing.


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I have always used high quality 1 quart zip lock bags (ones with zipper). Fill with dough and let sit in fridge for 24 hours. Then freeze any you will not use in the next week. They will blow up like little festive dough Balloons, once in a great while a zipper will break and need to be repacked. Otherwise I find the pressure keeps the yeast in check and ...


1

Mailliard reactions. I'm going to guess there's already another question for this one and this will prove a duplicate, so low-effort answer. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maillard_reaction Basically (and I don't claim to know any better than that) it's alterations in the proteins brought about at elevated temperatures (there may also be carmelization, but ...


0

A tortilla is always going to get hard when deep fried as it's very thin and dry. There's no air or moisture to puff up in a tortilla, so I don't see how you would be able to make authentic poori with them. I've never made them myself but my understanding is that you need to make a dough, roll it to about 1cm thick and fry it.



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