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1

It looks as though it baked unequally which could be caused by the dough not being uniformly mixed. Here are some things that I am sure that you already know. (please keep in mind I have never made Challah) Mix your dry ingredients and make sure they are well mixed Mix your wet ingredients and make sure they are well mixed add the wet ingredients to the ...


2

The King Arthur website lists the ingredients for that item: http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop-img/labels/1416587131567.pdf It looks like the "sour" flavor comes from several acids (acetic, lactic, and citric). I assume the recipe calls for "sour" flavor instead of being a sourdough recipe like a traditional rye bread would be. Pickle juice may be a good ...


1

I use a coarse (polenta) grind cornmeal, and used to soak the cornmeal overnight like @Rob. Lately I've started pre-cooking the cornmeal instead. Mix the cornmeal 1-1 with boiling water, then microwave 3-4 minutes at 50%. Reduce any water/milk in the final recipe by 1/3.


1

I have been experimenting with adding intact grains and nuts to my bread for a little while and have learned some things. Good gluten development is crucial. If my whole wheat bread is already dry or underdeveloped then additional grains will make it fall apart when I try and slice it. A tiny amount of xanthan gum also helps give sandwich bread extra ...


2

Using a large amounts of seeds will significantly influence the humidity of your dough and bread. Dry seeds will soak up quite a bit of water - either during resting time or afterwards. This is especially bad when this soaking happens after baking, as your bread will get very dry... Wholemeal tends to have the same effect. The best way to counteract this ...


1

Here is what I've learned so far about cornmeal - grinds -- there are three available that I know of: Fine Medium and Coarse. Bob's Red Mill makes all three. I think the above-mentioned 'corn flour' is one step finer than fine corn meal. Usually cornmeal is yellow, but can also be found as white cornmeal. I've only ever seen that in a find grind. ...


3

As jolenealaska pointed out in a comment, corn flour has no gluten, which is essential to the texture of most breads and many other baked goods. Unless you replace the gluten with vital wheat gluten or some kind of gluten substitute, your corn flour loaf would have a crumbly texture very uncharacteristic of ciabatta. rumtscho added: If by "corn flour" ...


2

This seems like a great use of frozen pie crust, the ones that come in a sheet not pre-formed in a tin. This would certainly reduce the time and effort on your side.


5

Based on you mentioning curry and bread, have you thought about either chapatti or roti? Asides from them being Indian bread and so complementing your curry completely, they are quick and easy to make a little kneading but will take less time than making pastry or biscuit dough. Just make the dough, roll out into a few rounds, fill one half, then fold the ...


6

Many filled doughs don't require long resting times (maybe 30min to an hour), but they generally do require a little bit if kneading to make sure they're sturdy enough to hold a filling. If you have a stand mixer or a food processor, you likely won't need to do any hand-kneading. I'd recommend looking at recipes for either empenadas or samosas. (Look for ...


7

Yeah, how about biscuit dough? That's a common way to do a quick and easy chicken pot pie. It might be a little tricky to actually enclose the curry in the biscuit dough, but it should be doable. For reference, here are a couple of "pot pie" recipes that use biscuit dough on top of the filling: Add a Pinch (from scratch) Bisquick (Using Bisquick brand) ...


3

Given that oyster crackers as we know them were first created in the northeastern United States, I think the most likely hypothesis is that they were intended to be served with oyster stews and clam chowder, which are traditional regional cuisines that would have been quite popular around the same time. Their size and shape make them easy to add to soups, ...


-2

if it is cold liquid than use chocolate


0

Try placing an electric heating pad on the counter on low setting. Then put the bowl or pans on top. Check periodically to make sure it is not too hot. works great on granite countertops as they are usually colder than laminate ones. Good luck :)


0

I just made texas roadhouse rolls (4 cups of flour and about 3 cups of other ingredients) with a ge 300 watt hand mixer and dough attachments. The mixer handled it perfectly fine... I on the other hand found it difficult to hang on to the bowl and mixer but it is definitely doable.


4

Overall, you should be fine. The purpose of the dutch oven is trapping moisture and, to some extent, coralling the dough. Keep the following in mind: Make sure your bowl can handle the heat - high heat might cause it to warp. To some extent, this is fine, but if the gaps at the bottom get too big, you won't trap the steam the way you want. But some loss ...



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