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i have not tested this myself but I do have a thought. I would tend to think that something a little less conductive would yield better results than a stainless steel stock pot. Cast Iron, Terracotta, earthenwear and other pots typically used for this are decent insulators, they take much longer to heat up. Just a stainless steel pot would probably ...


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The best way I've found to keep my homemade bread fresh is to refrigerate it. After it's cooled to room temp I put it in a plastic bread bag and refrigerate. I make 1/2 whole wheat, 1/2 white flour bread and this is the only thing that keeps it from going moldy on me before I can finish it. My recipe makes a 2 lb. loaf. I put honey in it instead of sugar, ...


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Just to add a comment to Didgeridrew's great summary, the real danger of adding anything other than flour and water to starters is contamination. A sourdough culture consists of a symbiotic community of yeasts (which make the bread rise) and lactic acid-producing bacteria (which make it sour). Like almost any natural fermentation process, sourdough depends ...


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Just to clarify (and build on a previous comment): "sourdough bread" generally has anything from a subtle hint of sourness to a strong sour tang. However, the word "sourdough" is also used in bread-making to refer to natural yeast cultures in general, which can be used to produce many types of bread, including those which are not sour at all. As ...


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Adding sugar or honey to a sourdough culture will increase the activity of the yeast for a little while, but it is unlikely to create "new types of flavour". Honey and Sucrose (Table sugar) are both just simpler sources of glucose and fructose that the sourdough microbes usually get from breaking down the starches in flour. Unlike flour, honey and sugar do ...


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There are many variables that could be at play here - some of the obvious ones have already been suggested, e.g., ambient temperature. The yeast fermentation process is very temperature sensitive, and can vary 100% in time for a change of less than 10 degrees Celsius, depending on your yeast strain. Other factors might include moisture level - if the dough ...


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Start with dried fava bean flour, or chickpea (garbanzo) flour. Best to buy the pulse flour pre-ground, as it tends to be difficult to grind finely with home equipment. Use initially only a small amount (<5% of total flour by weight) for flavoring, and gradually increase to taste. Some other pulses can be bitter, and also be aware that any larger ...


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I make my machine bread totally saltless and usually add grains...seeds etc. according to taste and availability. It is very important to reduce the amount of yeast!!! I only add 2/3 of the yeast in the recipe and add a 1/4 teaspoon of bread improver and a bit of brown sugar and oil, of course. It tastes great as is when just baked. Once it is cool, I ...


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You cannot keep the texture if you are using that much sugar. Two tablespoons of sugar per cup of flour is the maximum that you can add without major gluten damage. [...] Too much sugar is also damaging to the yeast. (quotation from Cookwise by S. Corriher). She goes on to explain that certain kinds of bread are made with more sweetness (including ...


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I've never tried making a bread dough with that much sugar in it. You're up to ~80g sugar, compared to 140g flour (a "baker's ratio" of 57%). It's possible that much sugar interferes with gluten development. Since you're already adding butter later (at around 4:07 in the video), the first thing I'd try is to mix the extra sugar and butter together, and add ...


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Let me suggest a totally different approach: Why not working with the cool conditions instead of against? You could let the dough proof for a long time, e.g. over night in the fridge. This allows for a lot less yeast and hence a less yeasty taste, which is usually desired. Also, more complex flavors develop during long proofing times. (There is a reason ...


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In the winter, I usually get fine results proofing in a bowl with a second bowl inverted on top of it, and then putting the whole thing in the oven, turned off, and just the light on. The light bulb usually produces enough heat to keep the inside of my oven at about 90˚F (32˚C?), and that gives me a good rise.


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50C (122F) would be a very high proofing temperature. The thermal death point of yeast is 55C, and you'll definitely hit a point of diminishing returns if you get too hot (most likely, you will have really rapid proofing on the outside of the loaf and an underproofed "core"). I would recommend setting your oven to the lowest temperature, and then once it ...


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Yes. There would be a difference in texture. Some jaggery tend to be a bit sticky when heated. Groundnut chikkis is a good example. Also, sugar tastes different than jaggery when cooked. Jaggery has an earthy tang to it. In my honest opinion, if you can get good quality jaggery, prefer it over sugar. Simply because its more natural product than sugar.


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You can certainly maintain a culture this way, though not all cultures will necessarily thrive. Commercial yeast, for instance, doesn't tend to do well with feedings. It basically rises and it's done. Wild yeasts will do much better by being fed. The degree of sourness in the cultured flour will depend on the specific strains of yeast and bacteria growing ...


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Strong flour has extra gluten added to it, you can find it many varieties (strong white, strong brown, strong wholemeal). I haven't found much difference between brands but I'd avoid store "value" packs. Sometimes if you want a coarser grain you will need something specialist, but I rarely buy flour anywhere but the supermarket. You will probably want to ...


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Depends on your budget, personally I find bog standard value Tesco strong flour tastes the same as top of the range organic premium stuff. Yeast I think it probably depends on your recipe, some will use fresh some will use dried instant action. The different brands don't really have any influence. I'm convinced it's all made in the same factory but stuck in ...


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Go to youtube and check out the video on making rainbow bread here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z9XDwTRE1dE If I were to do it, I think I would make separate batches of dough and add the coloring to the liquid. Color bread was all the rage in the late 50's 60's for bridal and baby showers and special party lunchs.


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Don't use whole wheat flour if you want a strong or thin crust. The shards of bran in the whole wheat flour will cut the strands of gluten, weakening the crust, which prevents it from being stretched very thin. You can verify for yourself by performing the windowpane test.


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Three things: Most traditional Neapolitan pizza dough does not use a pre-ferment - poolish, biga, or sourdough starter. Not to say it may not be good, but it wouldn't the way most are made. Sourdough starters change their flavor profiles by age and by geographical region. In general, I would expect a bit more of a 'tang' from the sourdough starter than ...


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Firstly, make sure you're using yeast that has not passed the expiration date. If you're finding chunks of yeast, you may want to check the dough during the knead cycle and hand knead a bit to make sure it is well combined. How to add your yeast depends on two things, 1) what type of yeast (instant or active dry) and 2) when you plan to start your kneading ...


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To compare, I made exactly half that recipe, also measured in grams. It wasn't liquid, it was dough-like, but it was absolutely whisk-able. As a matter of fact, I only used a whisk to mix this. For what it's worth, I have a lot of trust in Paul Hollywood. I imagine this biga will be much more liquid in the morning. I'll let you know when I get up. EDIT I ...


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All other factors - ambient temperature, humidity, oven temp, etc - accounted for, the specific time of the day doesn't make any difference, whatsoever. But alas, this is the real world, we don't hold other factors constant. Most likely your room is slightly warmer and potentially your room could be a bit more humid in the afternoon. These could lead to a ...


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What you are looking at here is an old, almost forgotten method of proofing yeast dough for cold conditions. I have an old cook book1 from ca. 1930, when rooms could be cold in winter. I'd say it's "granny's version of proofing in the fridge". My book says to leave out about 1/4 of the flour, all sugar and, if used, the spices. It does not, however, say to ...


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First the gritty taste is the type of corn meal you purchased. Just purchase a fine milled corn meal. BUT you can make corn bread from Cream of Wheat. Yes corn bread can be made with other ingredients other than corn meal. My grandmother could not eat corn meal because of an allergy so her doctor gave her the idea of cream of wheat use it just like corn ...



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