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The cooked flour reminds me of how choux pastry is made. Check into the methodology of choux pastry for your answer...http://joepastry.com/2011/how-does-pate-a-choux-work/


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The second rising is quite necessary for good, light, airy bread. When you fold the bread and then shape it into a proper loaf, you compress it, pushing out some of the air pockets that grew when it was rising. If you don't let it rise a second time after shaping, the bread won't have the proper airy-ness and it will be very dense. You can't shape the ...


7

In order to understand what's going wrong you need to understand what's happening in the oven. Bread rises in the oven because the yeast gets a boost from the heat before it is killed by it, and by the expansion of gases (O2, CO2, and water vapor) trapped in the dough. Well-developed gluten will trap air well, under-developed gluten will allow it to ...


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It's a late answer, but I do this all the time when I'm feeling lazy and don't want to make traditional roti. Heat up oil to 300 to 350 in a skillet .about 2 inches of oil. Or use your deep fryer at 350, just make sure it's large enough. The most important thing is your oil needs to be up to temperature. As soon as you toss in the tortilla it should ...


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Is pumpernickel a form of pumpkin bread? No, definitely not. Pumpernickel is defined by the grain used (specifically rye) and not by any added ingredients. Can you make bread with pumpkins? Sure! Pumpkin bread is generally a moist quickbread, and like banana bread is often intended as a breakfast food. Unlike with bananas, the pumpkin usually has to be ...


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A better analog would be to use a zucchini bread recipe since they are both squashes, however is there a reason why you don't use a pumpkin bread recipe? Pumpkin on its own isn't necessarily the most pleasant flavor. It's the spices that go with it that make it taste great. If you want a pumpkin like bread but without all the spices you might prefer using ...


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8 tbsp cheddar cheese powder, white or orange 1 tbsp of onion powder 1 tbsp of garlic powder 1 heaping tbsp of Italian seasoning Experiment by add 1 tbsp to your pizza dough flour mixture


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Another option-- if it is available to you-- is a grocery store in an area with significant population of recent Eastern European immigrants. There was a Polish store in Ann Arbor, MI (until it closed last year) where the live yeast was available by weight (cut from a big block, of the same consistency as cake yeast).


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The lack of vent holes would have been a problem. Vent holes allow steam to escape, reducing the amount of internal moisture. This moisture will both prevent the crust from cooking fully through, and will cause the crust to soften as after it comes out of the oven. That's not to say that there wasn't also some other problem, just this is one thing that ...


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After living in the UK for more than a decade I share your pain in finding good burger buns. You can often find burger buns in the store but they are usually pretty bland and artificial. Better quality buns in the right shape or size are usually heavy and chewy. You could take a cue from the artisan "posh" burger places that are popping up all over London ...


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Try a homebrewer's supply store, or ask at a local bakery if you can buy some of theirs off of them, or (even better/cheaper) you could make your own sourdough starter.


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In Melbourne, Australia, there are several types of flatbread termed Lebanese and one I know is stretchy-like. If you check out Australian chefs for recipes - Donna Hay, Greg Maloof and you'll need to check others online. If I find out what the brand is I'll put up another note.


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There is a similar tradition in Bulgaria. On the Christmas Eve is served Christmas bread with a coin inside it. Then everyone takes a piece of the bread. The one who finds the coin inside his piece will be very lucky and happy during the next year. The Christmas bread can be in different shape with variety of ornaments and symbols. According to the old ...


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Do you use any fats in your mix? On this page there is the suggestion that adding some fat -- say, 50g of butter or oil -- can extend shelf life. Fats (butter, oils, milk, eggs). Fats enrich and flavor the bread. They also soften the dough and preserve it: whereas a fat-free loaf of bread like a French bread goes stale after only a few hours, a loaf of ...


1

I don't think a spoonful of sugar, honey, etc added to a loaf to encourage the yeast will make much of a difference. Sugar can act as a preservative but only at pretty high concentrations, and the amount you use in bread isn't going to be high enough. My experience is that home-made bread will get stale long before it gets moldy. I've seen supermarket bread ...


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Here in the UK, I can use 1/3rd of a 1.5kg bag of strong white bread flour (95p/3=32p) and 1 sachet of dried yeast at 11p to make a loaf for 43p, and that gives me a loaf equivalent to this 800g supermarket sandwich loaf at £1.00. Tastes better, too. So that's better than double, in my experience.


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I'd do a rest/first prove of nearer an hour or so - just double the size before knocking back / shaping. Then another hour or so for it to rise, before baking. If you can't give it the time because of work, you can try chilling the dough; a six-hour prove in the fridge will slow the yeast and might help you avoid over-proving. Since you asked about flour -- ...


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Can you get access to a grill or similar? Switch the problem to 'how can I get my ready-assembled grilled cheese sandwiches to work?' and it's a much easier problem! I've tried making batches of sandwiches on a sunday night and popping them in a freezer for the week, and it worked OK. I didn't try pickles; I imagine the water content in them, or in ...


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To go another route -- a bit of forward planning and the use of a fridge might be another way to solve your problem, which is probably one of boredom or inconvenient timing. Instead of making bread over the course of a morning -- say, between 9am and midday -- you can make it over 24 hours in the fridge, using the cold environment to slow the yeast and ...


6

It's a tradition in Scotland as well. A boiled suet fruit cake Clootie Dumpling is when eaten at Christmas especially has small coins and charms included in the mixture. The mixture is put in a clean muslin cloth and boiled. Although traditionally eaten at Christmas the pudding is also eaten at other times but the coins/charms are only used at Christmas. ...


5

Yes, this is definitely a Greek tradition, a New Year's bread called vasilopita Vasilopita (Greek: Βασιλόπιτα, Vasilópita, lit. '(St.) Basil-pie' or 'king pie', see below) is a New Year's Day bread or cake in Greece and many other areas in eastern Europe and the Balkans which contains a hidden coin or trinket which gives good luck to the receiver, like ...


1

I'm not much of an expert, but it looks to me like you should be changing the direction of your scorin as this guide recommends; for batards, you want to slash more top-to-bottom instead of across the loaf. Also, angle the cut at about 30 degrees, so you're cutting more of a flap than a gash. Also, I don't know how you're shaping it before the prove, but ...


2

Before we start on what might have gone wrong, let me assure you that you obviously are doing a lot of things right: You have surface tension in your loaf and good oven spring, meaning you got the shaping right and seem to put your bread in the oven at a good time during the final rise - my guess would be "slightly underproofed", which is exactly what you ...


6

From a seller's product description1: In der Backindustrie verwendet man Lupinenmehl als Zusatz zu Brotmischungen, da es das Brot aromatisiert, elastischer und länger haltbar macht. (The baking industry uses lupin flour as additive in bread mixes because it makes the bread more aromatic, elastic and increases shelf life.) Another description2: ...


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In the fall, I made about five loaves of sour dough bread with a starter a friend gave me. Over the holidays, the starter was in the fridge for about five weeks without my using it. Then, after feeding it twice, it seemed to be back to normal and I made a standard sour dough white bread. It rose beautifully and looked great. However, it did not taste ...


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I don't proof the yeast either; it goes on top of the flour, dry. I routinely heat the water to 135-140°F and combine it with salt, sugar, dry milk, and oil (this mixing lowers the temp about 5 degrees). The mixture is then poured on top of the yeast & flour, and mixing begins. I've done it this way with both active dry and instant yeast. I know this ...


2

Leaving the bread out uncovered overnight is likely one of the larger issues with staling. All bread will start to stale immediately after it's come out of the oven -- commercial bread simply has other ingredients to help slow this effect. (and I know we've had a question on this topic) They also package the bread in plastic to hold moisture near the loaf ...


3

I assume you're trying to extend shelf life for a couple of days, not weeks. One possibility is dough enhancers, many of which improve shelf life. Most can be very easily incorporated into an existing bread machine recipe. There are a variety of possibilities, and you can also buy commercially available dough enhancers that combine various helpful additives ...


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Here's a thought. I found this forum by asking that very question and then something popped into my head. The long the bread is allowed to rise (as in number of times) the more yeast is produced. The punch down does remove the air pockets so the bread isn't full of gaping holes. Does this make sense?


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I don't know if I'd qualify is as a machine, but they're called either a 'proofer' or a 'proofing box'. You'll need to check the description, as some boxes are just plastic and are intended to go into a larger proofing room.


2

Basic bread requires flour, water, salt and yeast (nothing more). The salt and yeast contribution to the weight is negligible. Water, in my experience, shall be - before cooking - about 70% in weight with respect to flour; the actual quantity depends mainly on the kind of flour, but 70% is a reasonable average estimate. Loss of total weight during cooking is ...


0

A few options: Add a bit (or a bit more) sugar to the dough. Use a sourdough starter instead of yeast. The ideas in Sourdough in Bread Maker? might be helpful. Add lupin flour, as mentioned in "Why add lupin flour to white bread?" Store in a paper bag. If you're not using a breadmaker, leaving the dough overnight to have the yeast really do their job ...


0

I am not entirely sure about this, but my theory is based on the way microwaves interact with water. Microwaves are resonant with the rotational frequency of water's dipole, and works by using frequencies that are not quite resonant so that instead of causing rotations some of the energy is lost to friction which increases the vibrational frequencies of the ...


2

flour/water : 100:50 - 100:65 as you like the dough -> 1kg flour : 1,5kg -1,65kg dough. You have 10% loss of weight by backing. Thats all.


16

In my experience, it doesn't really save money, but it's still worth it because it's fresh and better than store-bought at the same price. For me, 1kg of all purpose flour yields 1.6kg of bread (as two loaves). Each 13x4x4" (Pullman) loaf weighs about 800 grams after cooling and yields between 24-30 slices depending on thickness. The cost per loaf is under ...


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It would depend greatly on the recipe used. However, for example, this recipe from Jamie Oliver for "Basic Bread" yields 1 loaf of bread and utilizes 1kg of flour. Additionally if you are comparing for economic reasons, you'd also need to take into account the cost for yeast, salt and any enrichments (egg, sugar, etc as specified by recipe). The average ...


1

Using a stand mixer with a bread hook attachment is wonderful. I used to make my bread by hand before I got my stand mixer. The stand mixer kneading is all you "knead". Every couple minutes, stop the mixer and scrap the sides off of the bowl with a spatula and all the dough off the hook. It will take about 10 minutes to knead in the stand mixer. Scrape it ...


0

Room temperature is out if you use any spreads like mayo, you'd need to refrigerate them or freeze them, neither of which is good for the consistency of the bread. In either case your bread will be soggy and/or stale. I'd say you could get away with one day in the fridge and still have it reasonably edible, depending on the bread and other factors. Of ...


0

Knead it in the machine until it is ready. No further kneading by hand necessary. If you don't know how to recognize dough which is ready, make one small batch with high hydration (75-85%) by hand, kneading without stick prevention (flour, oil or water). Just take the goo in one hand, stretch and fold onto the other in the air, and continue. Try doing it ...


0

The freezer is your only option. If you don't like the taste after unfreezing, then there is nothing you can do and have to make your sandwiches fresh.


3

Since this is a bread you are accustomed to baking, you know how the dough should feel. You will either have to change the amount of liquid or the amount of some other ingredient(s) - probably the flour. I suggest that you start by adding some of the flour to the oat flour and all of the wet ingredients. Then, continue adding more flour until the dough ...


0

Me thinks some artisan breads with open texture are being made with baking powders, I notice lack of yeast in taste, possibly more liquid, flour with elevated protein content, working dough for tough chewy texture with relatively hard outer crust, perhaps undisturbed extended rise (if some yeast is used, or acidic component to complement levan as many are ...


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In 1997 I was seeking to make a good biscuit recipe while living in Albuquerque NM. In my research I found an article from 1905 in a local newspaper which stated to use potato-water to extend the shelf-life of baked goods. I used it in my extra large biscuits, and they lasted 4 days of eating. As I stored them in the cupboard, and they remained soft ...


4

My dough whisk, Vera, is one of the most useful utensils in my kitchen. There's something magical about the loops that cause whatever you're mixing to combine easier and faster than using a spoon. Not to be confused with a wire whisk, a dough whisk won't whip very much air into the mixture — unless you want it to. For making your shortbread, operate it ...


2

Shortbread should be crisp and crumbly, using a mixer to mix the flour in will work the glutens in the flour and make the dough stretchy which is not what you want. Using a spoon (wooden or not doesn't make any difference) or scraper will help limit the working of the dough. So cream the butter and sugar with the mixer for sure, but then stir in the flour ...


0

Your loaf may have cratered due to the lack of salt. Salt is essential to deactivate the yeast. Putting less yeast in will solve the problem but this may also affect the rise so a good balance of yeast and salt, on opposite sides of the pan, is essential. As a guide, about 2 teaspoons, 10 grams, of fast acting yeast and the same of salt is about right for a ...


0

I've been to a restaurant which proposes pizzas made of 100% of amaranth. So it is definitely possible to make some kind of dough, although I'm not sure how much complicate and lengthy it can get.



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