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3

No, they are quite different. Barley flour is just the milled grain, but malt has been sprouted so it has much higher enzymatic activity and is much sweeter. It is usually used to precipitate an enzymatic reaction in your bread, which plain barley flour won't do. The recipe may work by just leaving the malt extract out, but it may brown less or rise more ...


1

In my experience you have 3 choices. Lightly spray with water, oil of your liking (olive, canola, grapeseed, or sunflower not vegetable, and lastly, my favorite, brush on lightly sweet unsalted butter. Preheat your over to 350 degrees F (give or take 25 degrees) and do not keep in oven more than 5-7 minutes depending on how round your bread loaf is. ...


6

First off, there is a way bakers measure the proportions of ingredients that is pretty unique to bread—everything is measured relative to the amount of flour by weight. A ratio of 0.6 (or 60%) means if you use 10oz of flour, you use 6oz of that other ingredient. There are typical ranges for these. For example, salt will typically be 1–2%, yeast (depending ...


0

Without pictures, it's hard to say for sure, but that doesn't sound like malt. Malt syrup (barley being the standard grain used for malt) is fairly dark (between honey and molasses in color), but it's also transparent and would be dissolved in the dough. Malt powder isn't significantly darker than flour, and should be distributed evenly through the other dry ...


0

Could be; couple different possiblites; barley malt syrup; adds flavor http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/organic-barley-malt-syrup-16-oz Diastatic Malt Powder; gives your bread an extra yeast kick; similar to using yeast nutrient. After re-reading your post; sounds like some form of DMP...


1

I notice that the recipe calls salt optional. Have you been using the tablespoon of salt? If not, I recommend you add it. Salt controls the fermentation rate of the yeast and strengthens the gluten protein. Bread made without it will be dense, with a very hard crust. Otherwise, it sounds like your dough isn't receiving a long enough rise, or you may have ...


0

My wife suggested using our electric meat slicer. I did and it worked great.


1

Edited; expanding on answer. The two most common issues for bread is not enough water and not enough proofing. Although there are many ways to get there it all revolves around not having enough CO2 in bread because of under-expansion. 90% of the time root causes is due to a lack of moisture during one of the steps... So dry or tough bread can be the ...


0

Sourdough sounds nice. I use the cold rise and a blend of white, semolina, wheat flours and at least 8 hr cold rise. The sour dough flavor increases over time in the fridge. I do not mix oils or salt directly into the dough while it is in a cold rise. Instead it is kneaded into the dough afterward and the salt is allowed to diffuse from the outside in ...


2

Increase the amount of Semolina flour to strengthen the dough. I use 3/4 semolina and 1/4 cup Whole Wheat and 2 and 1/2 cup White flour. Too much hydration will add to the ripping and a tight gluten bond will resist stretching and want to spring back. To get a thin stretchy dough that is very relaxed I added a process the works well to provide a slight ...


7

Well, technically there is a minor difference between biga and poolish, but often the terms are used interchangeably. Just for clarification: A poolish uses equal parts (by weight) of flour and water and very little yeast (sources vary between 0.1% to 1% fresh yeast / 0.03%1 to 0.33% dry yeast of flour weight). This leads to a poolish being rather liquid ...


3

It depends on why your bread machine is having you keep your yeast dry: If it's because you're putting a bunch of ingredients in the night before and setting the machine to have bread ready for breakfast (e.g., on a delay), then you have to use dry yeast. The yeast needs to stay dry so it doesn't start growing until the machine is ready to start. If its ...


0

Add all dry ingredients as ordinary, when it's time to start adding liquid ingredients, add the yeast starter and make sure to subtract an equal amount of water from the recipe. It's that simple.


0

I know this is an old question, but I make a wet dough, wetter than usual, and then cook it in a dutch oven, taking the lid off for the last 15 mins of cooking. Thin crust and crispy, every time.


0

According to Foodbook a page I follow on Facebook this is what the web author says. Did you know salt in your Focaccia recipe (or any yeast based dough recipe), is not just there for flavor. Salt's main job in the recipe is actually to control the yeast activity during fermentation. Actually too much salt can really slow down the yest or even kill it all ...


1

In my personal experience, the role of salt in bread is mostly myth, reiterated over and over until it's accepted as fact by many people. I haven't salted dough for something in excess of 25 years, and I have not noticed any textural loss either when I stopped salting, or in comparison to other people's bread. When I last had this discussion with someone ...


4

I agree with many elements of the previous answers -- it could be due to the wet dough "resealing" and/or to the crust hardening too early and preventing further expansion. Doing a more horizontal slash than a vertical one is helpful to get good "ears," and extra moisture will keep the crust softer for a little longer to get more oven spring. Frankly, ...


-2

People eat one or the other because they only eat them without cheese and it also depends on the time of day.


1

I've only ever used white flour and water, nothing else. I mix mine with equal weights of both to get a 100% hydration starter. Nothing else is at all necessary.


1

I've never used anything other than good old bread flour or all-purpose flour. I've had a lot of success with Peter Reinhart's system of doubling the weight of your starter with equal parts flour and water. In other words, if your starter weighs 4 ounces, feed your starter with 2 ounces flour and 2 ounces water. Hope this helps!


2

What's happening is that your bread crust is hardening before the expansion is done, and the crust splits at the weakest point. You need moisture to keep it soft and pliable until it stops expanding. The options are: Put a pan of boiling water in your oven at the start of your bake, then remove the pan once your bread stops expanding Put your bread in a ...


4

What seems a straight cut at the finished batard often started as horizontal deep cut: Hold the blade almost horizontally and make a cut that basically creates a flap of dough or "overlap" of 1.5 cm or more. Oven spring expands the overlap, giving these wide "bands" on the surface. High hydration doughs are a bit "sticky", so vertical cuts are prone to be ...


0

GdD's information and suggestions are all informative and helpful. You might also try adding an 'autolyse' rest as the French do. After mixing the water, yeast, and flour together until well combined, allow the dough to rest for about 20 minutes. This allows the flour to become hydrated and the gluten to start its development. Since the gluten begins to ...


2

I have been baking no-knead bread in a heavy porcelain 2-qt.soufflé dish with a glass lid with great success and consistent crust on all sides. My recipe is based on Jim Lahey's magical recipe at http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/11376-no-knead-bread but I use only 1 1/2 cups water, 1 cup white whole wheat flour, 2 cups of bread flour,1 1/4 tsp. ...


0

I prefer not to introduce plastic into my baking where feasible. I spend time and money and love on baking, using nice organic flours and all natural ingedients, and the plastic shower cap, although very effective, makes me think there are unhealthy hydrocarbons dripping on to the lovely dough. I vote for clean white flour sack lint free tea towels, dampened ...


0

In theory, you should always clean your bannetons very meticulously. The main steps (as I was taught from a bunch of very experienced old ladies) would be: Knock them upside-down on your workbench two or three times to let loose material fall out. Take a stiff-bristled brush and scrub along the ridges to loosen stuck flour. Work carefully but firmly to get ...


2

The problem is that the dough is so moist on most no-knead breads, that the weight of the bread itself will crush down, leading to a difference in texture between the top and bottom of the loaf. I suspect that's the reason that they often tell you to bake them in a pre-heated cast iron pot -- so that the bottom will set before the warmth of the oven causes ...


2

The answer is mostly just "it's tradition", as with most questions like this. I do think the pattern you've described isn't quite the actual one. What really happens is that we tend to eat peanut butter and jelly on sandwiches, and put one or the other on single slices of bread, because with a sandwich you can spread one thing on each half and put them ...


1

The only "loaf pan with a lid" I'm familiar with is the "Pullman" pan. I have seen suggestions to use a board wrapped in foil or foil under a casserole dish set on top of a regular loaf pan if trying to emulate that form without the right pan. Foil alone would probably not hold. I don't own one and have never emulated it. I suppose if someone was using a ...


1

There's only onw way that I know to tell the two apart without using it: granule size Instant is (typically?) smaller than (most?) active dry yeast. However, unless you have a magnifying glass, and maybe some source of yeast for a comparison, it's going to be very, very difficult to tell them apart. I don't know how much granule size is a function of ...


2

You can't really tell by looking, at least not without a known sample of the same brand. The good news is that they are usually interchangeable 1:1. Make a recipe you know well. Does it rise as you expect? Or does it take more or less time? That will most likely give you your answer. If the dough behaves as usual, it's a good bet that you have what you ...


5

The difference between gluten and gliadin is the one already explained in your question: Gliadin is a precursor to gluten. You could say that gliadin is to gluten what grains are to porridge. Gluten is the result of glutenin reacting with gliadin in the presence of water, just like porridge is the result of grains "reacting" with milk in the presence of ...



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