Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

According to comments I found on the internet about diabetics discussing this same question using this same model, one person recommended this: I changed the crust selection to light and reduced the flour by a tablespoon and the problem was solved. You don't really need a recipe specific for this exact model, here is a low carb bread recipe designed ...


1

While I am not 100% sure what you are eating and looking for and am relatively new to bread making myself, I'm going to guess that what it comes down to is a matter of fat content in the bread. What gets called "French Bread" (in the baguette sense) is usually a mixture of flour, water, salt, and yeast (similar to the recipe in The Bread Baker's ...


1

The crispiness also depends on your rice to urad dal ratio. If its 2:1 or 3:1, and the batter is thinner, you can get crispy dosas at home as well. I use a heavy non-stick pan which doesn't require oil coating, but you can add a tiny amount of oil, especially around the edges to get extra crispiness. Here's a video which show what I have suggested: ...


2

I put my bread in the slow cooker on the 'warm' function. Works a treat!


3

The crispness comes from the very high heat of the very thick cast iron skillet used in restaurants. The usual non stick pan, unless it is made of heavy cast iron, cannot produce that crispness. Kind of the American reason why oven pizza does not come out nice and crusty like the stone oven pizza. The ingredient is the very high heat that is missing here.


0

I concur with the information @Stephie has provided. However, there is a 'black wheat flour' that is widely used in France and other European countries. It is actually made from buckwheat, which by definition is a grain but not wheat at all. From this Wikipedia article : The seed coat is green or tan, which darkens buckwheat flour. The hull is dark ...


2

Flour types are quite different in various countries, but yes, all flours are basically made from crushing grains (wheat in this case). A grain mainly consists of three parts: Source: http://www.californiawheat.org/industry/diagram-of-wheat-kernel/ The bran. The outer layer of the grain. The endosperm. The white inner part that we tend to associate ...


2

One of the best known (if not the best known) breads in Japan is, in fact, very much like a brioche. Japanese Milk Bread contains butter and egg, it also contains a fair amount of sugar. The Japanese think of bread more like a sweet than a staple. Another sweet bread known in Japan is Maple Bread, it's even sweeter and really does taste like maple syrup. If ...


1

Not at all. It is possible to make bread that way, but it's rather rare. If you are using any kind of preferment, even a 10 minute sponge, you are likely to add dry ingredients to it. Then you add this mixture of dry+wet to the rest, and the order for "the rest" can vary. Also, if you have any enrichments, they are usually added after the flour has been ...


0

You should dry roast the seeds before putting them in bread dough. It will have a really strong flavour. He used the unhulled seeds for the mild flavour. You can either use hulled or unhealed. I believe that you have washed the sesame seeds, dried them, dry roasted them and then ........ WHOOP in the dough. That will of course taste great....


2

Breadcrumbs in meatballs (and meatloaf) will help to keep them moist by absorbing fat and juices that are given off as they cook. I don't think that almond meal would have quite the same effect. I tend to add some extra moisture through additional vegetables (finely minced in a food processor, then cooked to soften them up and evaporate any liquid that ...


1

Go right ahead and use the almond meal. In its list of uses for almond meal, this source says: Use almond meal in place of breadcrumbs in meatballs. In fact one of the recipes on the site is for Meatballs Parmesan. It calls for ground meat without specifying a type, so I assume your turkey would be fine. In addition, the description of this almond ...


0

There is no need whatsoever for breadcrumbs in meatballs, they are there only as a filler (to make more servings) They are mistakenly labelled as binders (to make everything stick together), but they do not have that property Most meats when finely ground are themselves good binders Using eggs or milk is usually sufficient to hold a mixture of ground ...


0

I agree, milk makes a better starter - much more sour. If you want you can use nonfat milk, too! I use 1% - have done so ever since I started -- 10 or more years -- I tried switching to water, just didn't work well.



Top 50 recent answers are included