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9

There's really no such thing as 'sealing in juices' when it comes to meat. Skin-on chicken breast stays relatively moist because of the fat in the skin; because the skin is on top, it pretty much self-bastes. Broiling just crisps the skin afterwards and will do nothing moisture-wise. With pork chops, however, the fat is around the side and so will drip off ...


8

The first thing I have to say is kebabs and overcooked are synonymous. If you want all your meats and/or veggies to be cooked right, I would advise you to put each item on it's own skewer so you can take them off as they are finished. As for a broiler and broiler plate functioning as a substitute for a grill, I would say that it won't be an exact ...


7

I'm going to assume this is an American recipe, as broiling has a slightly different meaning in Australia & the UK. With broiling, the oven only heats the top element in the oven, and you turn the element or burner up as hot as it can get. It's not a specific temperature, as in most ovens, that would cause it to cycle on & off. (in fact, when ...


7

I am assuming that you have actual goat ribs, like pork ribs, and not a rack of goat chops. I had a full goat breast that I just cooked them the other day. If you just broil them as you describe they will be tasty...and tough...and greasy. You want to treat these like pork ribs, needing a slow cook. I first smoke my ribs, then braise them, then finish ...


6

General advice, any time you're cooking something that is going to become one with the pan under high heat, cover the pan with foil before you put the stuff on it. As another possibility you can buy a stoneware baking sheet. They season more like cast iron, so burned on fat is fine. Or you could just use cast iron...It's pretty much impossible to get ...


5

Broiling a steak is a great way to cook it. There are a few things you can do to avoid your issue. No need to oil your steak. It should have great flavor as is. To avoid problems with grease under your steak, put it on a wire rack over a 13x9 inch pan (or similar) with 2 inch high walls. Put 1/2 cup of kosher salt in the pan. This soaks up grease ...


5

Most nonstick pans should not be used under a broiler. If it's getting hot enough to turn oil to a polymer, it's way too hot for the nonstick coating. A plain stainless steel pan would work much better, and is easier to clean off burnt-on fats. Like you said, the fats "season" the pan. And the kind of pan that takes "seasoning" the best is one that is meant ...


4

I've found two good things to do with this fish (I dislike it broiled/baked): fish curry or soup, and fish tacos. I find the fish too bland to really do much on its own, but it serves as a decent base to the different pepper sauces that i put on tacos. For curries, the Indian state of Goa has some good ideas on what to do with fish, as do the Thais. You can ...


4

One way to get some quick charring without drying out the meat would be to use a blowtorch. To quickly caramelise and generate an effective Maillard reaction, you can: refrigerate the meat in an air-tight container, keep it cool so it doesn't overheat during the charring process Mix a touch of glucose syrup with an oil that has a high smoke point (like ...


4

I cannot speak to price; I haven't comparison-shopped with this feature in mind. However, I have used various home gas ranges with either type of broiler. I'll go ahead and sum it up: tl;dr: I greatly prefer an in-oven broiler. Here's why. First, positioning. Broiler drawers are typically located at the very bottom of the range, underneath the actual ...


3

Yes, a grill in the UK is essentially the same thing as a top broiler. In the UK, and most of western Europe, ovens are electric and have no separate drawer - the grill is a heating element at the top of the oven. Ovens come with a tray that slots in at the top, similar to a broiler pan.


3

If you try to char post-shredding you are very likely to dry it out. Try charring another ingredient instead, or just live with it un-charred.


3

I don't know that it's going to work with a broiler, as you'll likely brown the top too much. You might be able to get away with your oven as hot as it'll go and a pre-heated pizza stone. As for broiler temperature -- I don't think I've ever set mine to anything less than all the way up when using it. (but then again, I have an electric oven)


3

I tend to treat tilapia similar to chicken in that it's kind of a blank canvas onto which you project other flavors. It doesn't work everywhere chicken does, but one of my favorite uses is to chop it into little bits, and "stir fry" it. I season those browned bits and use them as the base of actual stir fry or with Mexican seasonings in tacos, etc.


2

I hate to say this, but broiling a pizza IS faking it! You could get one of those small electric ones that are popular with students and other one room living people for less than $20 - or just cook things right at the top of the oven (that works too well for me) - or use a blowlamp. Personally, I don't need a broiler to reduce food to a charred mess ...


2

As Mien pointed out in the comments, these terms can vary based on where you are from. My answer is based on the U.S. version of the terms. Grilling: To cook with direct exposure to heat, usually from below. Broiling: To cook with direct exposure to heat, usually from above. BBQing: To cook with indirect heat using wood in order to add a smoke flavor. ...


2

I think it is important to defrost the meat completely because it is impossible to season it properly if it is still frozen, you also risk burning the surface while the center is still cold if the steak is thick. You can put the steak (or other frozen seafood) inside a zipped bag like ziploc, squeeze out the air and zip the bag. Then put the bag under slow ...


2

Again, assuming they're similar to pork ribs: I'd cook them in Lager until soft - test with a fork every now and then - then leave them in the liquid until cold and for as long as you like - I regularly leave my pork ribs in the beer for a day or two. Then take them out, drain them, brush them with sauce and broil them until hot and crispy on the outside.


2

If by 'grill pan' you mean something heavy (cast iron) like: OR then it would be your choice as to whether you want to heat them on top of your stove or under your broiler. If your 'grill pan' is less heavy duty (say aluminum) then it is unlikely to be capable of with standing the heat required to 'best' cook a steak. When the weather here does not favor ...


2

Here's what I do - it simulates the high direct heat and then lower, indirect to finish ( like on the real grill with multiple zones): Put the 'grill' on the top rack (make sure its not coated or non-stick, that it can take high heat). (I do mean to put a pan under this to catch grease.) Turn the oven to broil for a few minutes. Prep your chicken. Put it ...


2

Assuming you cannot fix the oven (which would be my first recommendation as much for safety as anything else), then for browning things on the top I'd suggest using a cook's torch, which is the same thing as a plumbing torch except it's flashier. Of course you'll want to make burgers, steaks, fish, etc as well. Baking these will not get you nice toasted ...


1

From what you say, it sounds way too hot. I don't know about temperatures, and it seems odd to try to measure, since the element will be "very hot" and the actual temperature you get will depend on distance. But in my experience, most broilers especially at a healthy distance of 3 inches from element to food will take a minute to really brown the top of an ...


1

You could try leaving the oven door open just a crack to help circulate the heat a little better


1

If you have skin on dark meat remaining, which is very much more tolerant of cooking with less risk of overcooking, you might try this (with the caveat that I have not done it): Heat a grill pan or skillet (cast iron would work well for this) to smoking hot Brush it with vegetable oil Lay the pieces, skin side down, in the pan and cook just until charred. ...


1

I'm sorry if I'm being stupid, but I don't see the point of roasting these pork chops, unless you want to use the broiler for some other purpose while they cook. I line the broiling pan with aluminium foil, so the fat from the chops cannot escape into the bottom, and cook pork chops under the broiler. The only disadvantage is that they need watching, which ...


1

A broiler gives all of the heat from the top, and none from the bottom. If you really wanted to try to achieve a similar effect, and your oven didn't have a broiler option, I'd do the following: Adjust one rack in the oven to the desired height from the top element. Adjust a second rack slightly below that other one (as close as possible, so you can still ...


1

A toaster oven works great for smaller items. Most toaster ovens come with a broiler. Plus, toaster ovens are just a great tool for cooking smaller items without using a bunch of energy and heating up the house (especially in the summer months). Unfortunately a full sized pizza wouldn't work so well in a toaster oven. (Although you could split the dough and ...


1

It probably depends on the thickness of the steak, and how well you like your steak cooked. I know I can cook frozen burgers about maybe 2cm / 0.75 inch thick in a double sided grill (George Foreman or similar), and it'll come out to a doneness that I like. If you prefer your steak more towards the rare side, and it's not multiple inches thick, I'd think ...


1

I do this with Salmon, never tried it with Tilapia but I imagine it would still taste great! I basically take the salmon fillets and sprinkle garlic powder, ground black pepper, and cayenne pepper. Then I brush each of the fillets with 1 tbsp of olive oil. If you don't like the fishy smell, squeeze a few lemons over it and/or cut up a few slices of lemon ...


1

It's quite delicious simply sautéed/seared with salt and pepper. The real fun is serving it with perfectly glazed carrots and using that glaze as sauce for the fish, as well! You must try this. The sweet and buttery glaze make the slightly salty fish divine! I eat this about once a week and can't get enough!



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