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23

Classification and use of Stocks vs. Broth: Broths are generally the result of preparing another item and usually not prepared specifically on their own. The juices poured off from a roasted turkey (after being degreased) would be considered broth. Whole chickens being poached for another preparation would create broth. Stocks are prepared specifically ...


12

My first instinct would be to use it next time I made okra or collard greens. I think it would be very interesting to use to cook down beans, similar to pork and beans. Perhaps you could turn it into a savory pasta dish, I'm thinking in an Asian style. You can freeze it in ice cube trays (to portion easier later) until you think of something if you ...


12

The differences between stock, broth, consommé and bouillon is actually quite difficult to pin down. At one time a stock was something that was kept on the cooker and was constantly added to. These additions could have been meat, vegetables etc. Hence the name stock. These days fresh stock is typically made fresh, when needed. A stock typically forms the ...


9

Broth is actually frequently made from stock. It doesn't have to be, but often what a cook will do is make the stock using the bones to give it an even flavour and then boil the actual meat and some vegetables in it to make the broth. Throw in some grains and it's basically a soup - the line between broth and soup is blurry, if it exists at all. Broth can ...


9

You can have some good yakibuta ramen, mixing it with dashi (you can use fish stock in substitution). I followed this recipe: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-wa0umYJVGg


9

Ideally it is simmered, but the proof is in the taste really as there's no safety issue. If it tastes good then use it, if it doesn't chuck it.


8

Your instincts are good; throwing tasty broth away is a criminal waste! I have a couple ideas that are worth a shot. Risotto: use it for the broth or stock. You may wish to add some more sausage and seasfood bits in for extra tastiness. Rice/pilaf: use the broth in place of water for cooking the rice. It'll give a richer flavor to the result. Bisque: ...


7

Rendered beef fat can be used in a lot of ways. You can use it in place of oil in a lot of recipes, but finding out which ones you like will take some experimenting. Around our house, I use rendered fat from beef or bacon in place of oil when sautéing, for example with onions and peppers, garlic or mushrooms. I've also used it to add some kick to gravies. ...


7

170 degrees is perfectly fine. To talk bacteria, you have to take into account two factors: temperature, and time. Anything between 40 and 140 is good for them, anything above 140 is bad. At the same time, food in the dangerzone that is eaten/cooked/frozen promptly, is fine, because it takes time to build up a colony of harmful proportions. In this case ...


6

I don't know. I'm not Mr. OMG-Bacteria's-Gonna-Kill-YOU but I'd not want to keep a thing of starchy water (which is an ideal bacterial growth medium) in my fridge for more than a day or two. Add to that the fact that it's basically so cheap as to be free, and it's right at the bottom of the list of things I'd save.


6

A piece of muslin/cotton/fine-tissue-of-your-choice will do the job nicely. You can easily find it in kitchen stores or online.


6

Good home-made stock is easy and cheap to make. All you need is an old stock pot (no lid needed, you want the water to evaporate), and a bunch of pork bones and connective tissue. The bones will add the pork flavor, while the connective tissue will break down into gelatin. The best way to get the pot is a thrift store (charity shop to UK types), and the ...


5

I would use this broth to make soups. It would make a great base for a number of soups such as scotch broth, but also for using for the stock for making other soups such as lentil or whatever you fancy. Good luck!


5

One way to boost flavour would be to roast some beef bones till they brown a little (you can get bones from your butcher) and then cook them with your soup. You can take them out when the broth is cooked. This will add a nice depth of natural 'beefy' flavour.


5

Edible? Absolutely yes. Flavorful? ....you should taste it and tell us. Seriously, don't serve a meal to anyone, yourself included, until you've tasted it and it tastes at least decent. (Not trying to be snarky here, that's literally the best cooking tip I was ever given) Nutritious? Probably somewhat--that chicken muscle is primarily protein after ...


5

Formulas for stock are somewhat variable, but a common case is to use 3 kg of bones (and half a kg of mirepoix, which is a vegetable mix used for taste) with 4-5 l water, which after cooking down yields 3 l of stock, or just a little bit more than that. I couldn't find an especially good figure for the bone:meat ratio of chickens, but many Internet sites ...


4

From reading old cookbooks and Escoffier's commentary on it, it seems to me that one possible distinction is that stock is mainly about the texture it produces (ie the gelatin extracted from the bones), while broth is about flavor. Random tip: if you're a meat-eater and you've never tried it, drop the remains of a holiday roasted turkey into a pot of water ...


4

The main thing that beef fat is usually used for is Yorkshire pudding. You could save and use it when you want yorkshire pudding but may not be doing a roast. Duck fat, chicken fat, and bacon fat tend to have broader applications. It's really ultimately up to you and your preference and cooking style. Of course it does become cumbersome to keep a ...


4

The broth can be used for pretty much any soup...if the soups says to add in stock, use the broth instead. I use broth from ham for making lentil soup, and from a roast use it in pretty much any kind of soup! Sounds tasty :) Enjoy!


4

Your base probably needs to be a roasted squash puree, I don't think it will work well just being used to flavor a stock. Normally you would add cream to roasted squash to make a soup, but I guess that wouldn't be vegan. Butternut squash is tasty for this (and very autumn/winter), if you haven't actually picked out your ingredients yet. If you want to add ...


4

The major advantage of using pasta water is that it is high in starch rather than for any flavoring you may get from the water. You may find that you get some strange results if you're just subbing it directly for water or stock, and I wouldn't recommend keeping it for that reason. Personally, it doesn't seem like it's worth the effort of keeping. If I ...


4

If you use self-made beef stock, try boiling a bit longer, so that the flavour of the beef is a bit more concentrated. Boil your soup a bit longer. Use more beef stock and/or cubed beef. I don't know how much herbs you put in. Maybe a bit more pepper or rosemary can make a difference.


4

If it really bugs you, you could clarify the broth. You can mix egg whites with minced (chicken) meat. Add it to your simmering broth and wait until it floats to the top.


4

See Stock vs Broth - What's the difference in usage? Like most cooking words there is no global definition. Fat content varies by ingredients and recipe. Some fat is retained in suspension, and some will be chemically attracted to components of the stock and be difficult to remove Some people stir in the fat, most people skim it off Commercial stock ...


3

If you dont want to eat it, you can feed it to the birds. Take a small can, cut the top off, fold the top over so there are no sharp edges, pour excess fat into it until its almost full. Then throw in a few peanuts and stick it out for the birds.


3

I've used it when I make Tamales. After boiling the Pork Butt Roast, use the stock to add to the Masa along with the lard called for in the recipe. Your Masa will come out moist and delicious.


3

If the stock has aromatics it is certainly a great base for pasta water or deglaze in a pork dish, for beans and perhaps in a mash potato water to be finished with bacon, pork belly, and/or horseradish/sour cream.


3

Cook a risotto with it (pour the broth slowly to the rice while cooking and stirring continuously)


3

Ramen soup. Pork broth is a common part of the broth in ramen shops.



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