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23

Classification and use of Stocks vs. Broth: Broths are generally the result of preparing another item and usually not prepared specifically on their own. The juices poured off from a roasted turkey (after being degreased) would be considered broth. Whole chickens being poached for another preparation would create broth. Stocks are prepared specifically ...


12

My first instinct would be to use it next time I made okra or collard greens. I think it would be very interesting to use to cook down beans, similar to pork and beans. Perhaps you could turn it into a savory pasta dish, I'm thinking in an Asian style. You can freeze it in ice cube trays (to portion easier later) until you think of something if you ...


12

The differences between stock, broth, consommé and bouillon is actually quite difficult to pin down. At one time a stock was something that was kept on the cooker and was constantly added to. These additions could have been meat, vegetables etc. Hence the name stock. These days fresh stock is typically made fresh, when needed. A stock typically forms the ...


9

Broth is actually frequently made from stock. It doesn't have to be, but often what a cook will do is make the stock using the bones to give it an even flavour and then boil the actual meat and some vegetables in it to make the broth. Throw in some grains and it's basically a soup - the line between broth and soup is blurry, if it exists at all. Broth can ...


7

Your instincts are good; throwing tasty broth away is a criminal waste! I have a couple ideas that are worth a shot. Risotto: use it for the broth or stock. You may wish to add some more sausage and seasfood bits in for extra tastiness. Rice/pilaf: use the broth in place of water for cooking the rice. It'll give a richer flavor to the result. Bisque: ...


7

Rendered beef fat can be used in a lot of ways. You can use it in place of oil in a lot of recipes, but finding out which ones you like will take some experimenting. Around our house, I use rendered fat from beef or bacon in place of oil when sautéing, for example with onions and peppers, garlic or mushrooms. I've also used it to add some kick to gravies. ...


7

170 degrees is perfectly fine. To talk bacteria, you have to take into account two factors: temperature, and time. Anything between 40 and 140 is good for them, anything above 140 is bad. At the same time, food in the dangerzone that is eaten/cooked/frozen promptly, is fine, because it takes time to build up a colony of harmful proportions. In this case ...


6

I don't know. I'm not Mr. OMG-Bacteria's-Gonna-Kill-YOU but I'd not want to keep a thing of starchy water (which is an ideal bacterial growth medium) in my fridge for more than a day or two. Add to that the fact that it's basically so cheap as to be free, and it's right at the bottom of the list of things I'd save.


6

Good home-made stock is easy and cheap to make. All you need is an old stock pot (no lid needed, you want the water to evaporate), and a bunch of pork bones and connective tissue. The bones will add the pork flavor, while the connective tissue will break down into gelatin. The best way to get the pot is a thrift store (charity shop to UK types), and the ...


5

Edible? Absolutely yes. Flavorful? ....you should taste it and tell us. Seriously, don't serve a meal to anyone, yourself included, until you've tasted it and it tastes at least decent. (Not trying to be snarky here, that's literally the best cooking tip I was ever given) Nutritious? Probably somewhat--that chicken muscle is primarily protein after ...


5

Formulas for stock are somewhat variable, but a common case is to use 3 kg of bones (and half a kg of mirepoix, which is a vegetable mix used for taste) with 4-5 l water, which after cooking down yields 3 l of stock, or just a little bit more than that. I couldn't find an especially good figure for the bone:meat ratio of chickens, but many Internet sites ...


4

Your base probably needs to be a roasted squash puree, I don't think it will work well just being used to flavor a stock. Normally you would add cream to roasted squash to make a soup, but I guess that wouldn't be vegan. Butternut squash is tasty for this (and very autumn/winter), if you haven't actually picked out your ingredients yet. If you want to add ...


4

The major advantage of using pasta water is that it is high in starch rather than for any flavoring you may get from the water. You may find that you get some strange results if you're just subbing it directly for water or stock, and I wouldn't recommend keeping it for that reason. Personally, it doesn't seem like it's worth the effort of keeping. If I ...


4

From reading old cookbooks and Escoffier's commentary on it, it seems to me that one possible distinction is that stock is mainly about the texture it produces (ie the gelatin extracted from the bones), while broth is about flavor. Random tip: if you're a meat-eater and you've never tried it, drop the remains of a holiday roasted turkey into a pot of water ...


4

The main thing that beef fat is usually used for is Yorkshire pudding. You could save and use it when you want yorkshire pudding but may not be doing a roast. Duck fat, chicken fat, and bacon fat tend to have broader applications. It's really ultimately up to you and your preference and cooking style. Of course it does become cumbersome to keep a ...


4

If you use self-made beef stock, try boiling a bit longer, so that the flavour of the beef is a bit more concentrated. Boil your soup a bit longer. Use more beef stock and/or cubed beef. I don't know how much herbs you put in. Maybe a bit more pepper or rosemary can make a difference.


4

See Stock vs Broth - What's the difference in usage? Like most cooking words there is no global definition. Fat content varies by ingredients and recipe. Some fat is retained in suspension, and some will be chemically attracted to components of the stock and be difficult to remove Some people stir in the fat, most people skim it off Commercial stock ...


3

The basis for any sort of Japanese soup dish is going to be dashi stock, a stock made of fish and seaweed. It has a much lighter flavor than chicken broth, so you might not have identified it easily. You can buy it in a powder form for convenience, and it can be sprinkled into other liquids rather than reconstituted. This recipe is for soba with a dipping ...


3

If you want a clear stock, cheesecloth (and a healthy dose of patience) is the way to go. I would speculate that you might get better performance by first getting the big bits out by using a colander, and then go on to the fine-mesh sieve, finishing off with another pass through the sieve lined with cheesecloth. At that point, you can also use a little ...


3

Fine mesh sieve is the usual way, but the way you describe it, yours is not fine enough. Look in professional stores for a "chinois", this is the kind of sieve you need. But yes, it will take a long time. In classic restaurants, the stock will be cleared before going through the chinois. This is done by floating a rack of eggwhite which bounds the stray ...


3

Perhaps you could consider straining it twice? Use your strainer the first time to get out the larger particles and then do a second time with the cheesecloth so that it doesn't get clogged as easily. I imagine this wouldn't be any faster, but you'd have to fight with the clogged cheesecloth less.


3

A stock made from roasted chicken is never going to be clear like a consomme. You will note in the the video you reference, the stock is also moderately cloudy with some particles floating around in it. This is normal, and nothing to worry about. If you do desire a more clear stock next time: Bring the stock only to the most gentle of simmers to reduce ...


3

I don't think you can re-use the bones and expect to get a good product, no. But I wouldn't use a whole chicken to make stock in the first place. Use necks, backs, and wings instead -- much cheaper! You can roast the pieces first if you'd like, or not. You'll get different results, both good.


2

An additional note from Wikipedia: Be further aware that in Britain, there is a distinct difference between Broth and Stock, very different to U.S. definitions: A Stock is a thin liquid made by simmering raw ingredients until all the taste has been retrieved from them, finalised by sieving to get a result that is a liquid alone.


2

If yours comes out like my neighbors (she uses a huge roaster that'd probably fit a small turkey for doing her roast), you could do a few things: turn it into a gravy for the roast. (of course, her roast comes out so moist, it doesn't need it, but it still goes great over the mashe potatos.). use it in place of most anything that can use broth (but not ...


2

The famed Italian Cuisine chef and writer, Marcella Hazan,distinguishes between Stocks and Brodo (Broth) as follows: Stocks are primarily made from bones or shells (crustacean). Brodos (Broths) are primarily made from meats. Italian Cuisine favors broths according to Hazan. I have been making stocks for many years but I have never made a broth. But I ...


2

It should keep in the fridge for a week or two- and you should be able to smell it if it goes bad. However, you can just freeze any unused juice in 1 or 2 Tablespoon portions (in an ice cube tray) and keep it around for the next time you need it. Just transfer the frozen cubes into a labelled freezer bag so they don't get lost or thrown out. Waste not, ...


2

After you have completed cooking your stock and have filtered out all of the solids and let it rest in your refrigerator with a piece of cheesecloth laid across the top overnight (or for several hours...) the oils will rise to the top and solidify. After that you can (carefully) remove the cheesecloth and it will take all (or nearly all) of the oil/fat with ...


2

Reconstitute and chop up an ounce of dried porcini mushrooms, reserving the liquid. Filter the liquid to remove grit, and then add it and the mushrooms. You'll add a good burst of umami and a nice earthiness, without adding too much bulk. Also, fine-chopped celery works to give some interesting higher notes.



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