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26

Storing brown sugar in a tightly sealed container (such as tupperware, rubbermaid, etc.) is the best method. Once it dries out however it can be re-moisturized by placing a piece of apple or bread with it inside a tightly sealed container. After a day or two the brown sugar will soften and the bread will dry up or the apple will shrivel. This is due to ...


20

There are a variety of tips for quickly softening hardened brown sugar here: 10 Ways to Soften Hard Brown Sugar. The one that worked best for me personally, when I had to do this in a hurry, was to chip off a large chunk of the hardened sugar, put it in a (microwave-safe) Ziploc bag with a damp paper towel, and microwave it for 5-10 seconds at a time until ...


16

Put the regular (refined white) sugar and molasses (about 2 tablespoons per cup of sugar) in a food processor and give it a spin. Use more or less molasses as needed to get the color and consistency that you want.


11

White sugar is generally sucrose and has been heavily refined, so it won't undergo any chemical changes over time. In fact, sugar is actually used as a preservative. Brown sugar is a bit different. It gets hard simply because it loses moisture - i.e. the water evaporates - and that won't cause the taste to change. However, some people have reported brown ...


10

They have a different ratio of white sugar to molasses. Therefore, dark brown sugar is more hygroscopic, and will have a deeper molasses flavor (and color, obviously) They're pretty similar, and you can usually get away with replacing one with the other, but if you want subtle flavors coming through, dark brown sugar might mask it. I've seen ...


10

The in the US, light brown sugar always means the one in the bottom left. The bottom right is dark brown sugar and has a higher molasses content. In the US, I typically see the 'brown sugar' in the upper right referred to as 'raw sugar' or the brand 'sugar in the raw'. If you're using a US recipe, it needs the bottom left. If you don't have any and its ...


6

I've done this before, and you won't get exactly the same cookie as you got before. Confectioner's sugar is a total bomb. Don't bother. Dark brown sugar makes darker cookies, with a chewier texture, which keeps longer. This isn't always a bad thing. Several of my cookie recipes I thought were a bit dry were saved by DBS. It added a nice depth to the ...


5

When I have hardened sugars, especially when I first buy rocks of jaggery, I'll grate it like a hard cheese, which turns it back into a powder very quickly.


5

Your question seems to be conflating the question of bag vs boxed brown sugar with the question of "Brownulated" light brown sugar vs. regular light brown sugar. Brownulated pours like white sugar, but turns into a paste when it gets damp or wet. I think it tastes funny. Boxed vs Bag sugar is just a matter of storage and convenience. It's the same sugar.


4

Combining hot liquid sugar with a cold liquid will cause it to harden. That is one of the ways to test the stage of the sugar concentration. Do a search for Cold Water Candy Test for more information on that. I would recommend raising the temperature of the liquid or adding it slowly to prevent crystallization. That is what I typically do for my pecan ...


4

That sounds . . . strange. It would make more sense to heat the milk and sugar together first, thicken with the butter and flour, then add the eggs (tempering them with some of the hot mixture first). Alternately, you could just mix everything together cold (except for the butter, which would need to be melted). I don't really understand the necessity of ...


4

Its also worth noting that brown sugar is actually molasses and regular suger. Molasses has some diffrent properties like beeing higher in simple sugers meaning that it'll taste sweeter than regular sugar. if you do substitute them one-to-one expect the cake to taste sweeter than it normaly would have.


4

Yes you can...by volume. You'll definitely need to pack the brown sugar. The taste will be different (obviously) and the weight will be slightly different as well, but it'll work. Mind you, brown sugar does not dissolve the way white sugar does, so you may get some crunching if you don't combine it with your wet ingredients first. Don't substitute by ...


4

I have a very sensitive sense of taste and smell. I think the Brownulated sugar has a slight chemical smell and taste to it but no one else in my family can smell or taste the difference. I suspect what I am picking up is some sort of chemical change that occurs during the processing. I won't be buying it again.


3

Brownulated sugar? Ah! "Brownulated sugar" is a registered trademark and sold in the US only. From their (Dominos) web page: This easy-to-measure brown sugar is a cup for cup replacement for regular light brown sugar. Convenient, great tasting, and easy to use. So it must taste like ordinary light brown sugar after baking. ...


3

If your question is if we can, the answer is yes. Rapadura = brown sugar tablet. The brown sugar is very similar to panela and jaggery. The difference is the source of raw material, and the origin of the country where it is processed obtain the sugar. Jaggery is in Asia, brown sugar and panela or rapadura in many Latin American countries.


3

This doesn't directly answer your question, but a good substitution for brown sugar that is generally easy to find internationally is Jaggery. I find it substitutes very well. You should be able to find it at any Indian grocery.


3

Oddly, most brown sugar on the market isn't less processed sugar (like many believe) but rather refined white sugar with molasses re-added to it.


3

As Jefromi suggested, brownie recipes call for the sugar found on the bottom of the picture you have added. Probably the lower left one since it's a lighter brown. However if you are unable to get the brown sugar you are able to easily make it using granulated white sugar and molasses by mixing about 1 cup granulated white sugar with 1 table spoon molasses ...


2

I use a ziplock freezer bag and get as much air out as I can, and generally it keeps pretty well, 6 months or more. When it does get hard, slice a piece of apple and put it in the bag with the sugar for a couple of days. There are also ceramic disks you can buy that you can put in the bag with the sugar that will keep it soft for much longer, but I've never ...


2

I can't back this up with any evidence, but I think the reason it doesn't work well is that at the temperature required to caramelize sugar, the other "impurities" in brown sugar will be burned and gross. You might be able to get a similar effect by making regular white-sugar caramel and then mixing in molasses after it has begun to cool.


2

So, I tried it a second time, but this time I went all out. Got the sugar hot enough to pour in thin streams, put the liquid ingredients in a stand mixer on low, and slowly drizzled the sugar into the mixer. Combined reasonably well, well enough at least, that I didn't feel like I had to heat it further. So it is possible. It really only worked though ...


2

Normal cassonade is cane or candy sugar with added molasses (I don't know what the exact difference is with brown sugar, I think cassonade is just a type of brown sugar.), however this cassonade is from sugar beets. My best guess to replicate it is to put some regular granulated sugar for a couple of seconds in a blender, so the size of the particles is ...


2

The creaming step (beating sugar into fat) of cookie making creates air bubbles in the dough which will expand during baking. Powdered sugar (confectioner's sugar) won't create these bubbles, which is why it doesn't make a very good substitute for white sugar. Brown sugar is a more moist than white sugar, and will result in chewier cookies. Due to the ...


2

Since you haven't provided any additional information, I'm just going to provide our best guess here, what SAJ14SAJ and I were both thinking. If you want to put something in a croissant, whether it's a piece of chocolate or any other filling, the normal way is to put a strip of it along the side of the triangle which becomes the inside of the croissant. ...


1

It sounds a little like demerara sugar which is softer than some.


1

I'm not familiar with the brand you mention, however given it's description perhaps you could look for the following brand (which can be ordered through Amazon and no doubt other places): http://www.billingtons.co.uk/ I use this brand regularly and it is relatively soft. I also came across the following article which may help with substitutions: ...


1

There is a very small amount of moisture in brown sugar, and a very small amount of acid in the molasses. I don't know what the chemistry of "brownulated" is exactly. However, in practical recipes it makes very little difference. If you measure by weight and not volume, it all becomes nearly moot. Personally, I weigh all my sugar, using 7-8 oz per cup ...


1

I've done this before by steaming it. I used a large pot of water and suspended a bowl full of brown sugar above it. After a few minutes, it was soft enough to work with. It seems to me the same can be done with a tablespoon of water in a bown of brown sugar in the microwave. Just cover with plastic wrap and pierce for a couple steam vents. Just don't ...


1

Years ago I use to siice an apple in half....place it on wax paper and place the paper on top of the dried brown sugar. It use to work.....haven't had to do it for years. Hope this works for you.



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