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17

If you're not talking about very much water getting into the bowl, then these techniques should help. Remove the bowl of chocolate from the heat source. For every ounce of chocolate, add one tablespoon of one of these: warm water, melted butter, vegetable oil, hot milk/cream. Stir or whisk until smooth. Add a bit more liquid if needed. Use the repaired ...


15

Every time I make brownies, I always get compliments on how fudgy they are. There may be some variations based on the recipe you use, but the three things I've found to be most important in my experience are: Don't even think about using a boxed/pre-made mix! Bake from scratch - it adds a whole 3-5 minutes of extra prep time for brownies, but the taste and ...


14

I would crumble it up into a blender, add some vanilla ice cream and some milk. Blend it all together to make a Brownie Milkshake.


11

The in the US, light brown sugar always means the one in the bottom left. The bottom right is dark brown sugar and has a higher molasses content. In the US, I typically see the 'brown sugar' in the upper right referred to as 'raw sugar' or the brand 'sugar in the raw'. If you're using a US recipe, it needs the bottom left. If you don't have any and its ...


11

Butter is about 80% milkfat, and 20% water, more or less. 3/4 stick is 6 tablespoons. You should be able to substitute six tablespoons of coconut oil one to one. It should be well within the tolerance of the recipe. If you really want to account for the water, you would do about 5 tbl of coconut oil, and 1 tbl of liquid.


10

One of the most important factors in achieving a fudgy, chewy brownie is cooking time. Essentially you should be slightly undercooking the brownies so they don't dry out in the middle. Use the cooking times given in recipes as a guide only, because each oven will vary. 5-10 minutes before they 'should' be ready, start testing the centre of the brownies with ...


10

Butter is 83% fat, 17% water (we can ignore the milk solids in this case). Instead of 90 g butter, you can use 75 g coconut oil and 15 g more liquid (e.g. milk, or whatever the recipe specifies). There will be a slight difference in texture in the finished product, but nothing to worry about.


9

If you have a recipe that already produces a dense fudgy brownie and you're looking to do it without oil, you're just out of luck. If you're looking to produce a dense fudgy brownie and wondered if, while you were at it, you might cut back on the oil...NO, but here are some suggestions for making a cakey brownie more dense and "fudgey": Follow Tim's ...


8

The oven shelf is not the back of the oven. Basically what you would do is lift one side a little (maybe an inch or so) and let it drop. Then you can do the other side. This will give you a more fudgy and less cake-like crumb, as the cake-like finish comes from trapped air bubbles. If you rap the pan to help the air escape then you have less trapped air and ...


7

I have used the flax method as detailed in the New York Times with good results. I make a lot of chocolate chip cookies and I haven't found anyone that can really tell the difference. Some claim to be able to tell but also say that it is just different and not better or worse. 2 tablespoons ground flax seed mixed with six tablespoons water (or 2 eggs) ...


7

You might not be as consistent as you think. See my comments about baking cookies. One thing that comes to mind is amount of flour, and how (and how much) you're mixing -- but I don't know that those would make it 'thin' necessarily, but it would make them tough if you're over mixing. It might be a temperature issue, if you're using a solid shortening ...


7

Short and sweet... Use cake / pastry flour. At 5-7 % protein vs. 11% for AP vs. 13% + for bread flour, that means a lot less gluten formation. This protein, when mixed with water and subjected to mechanical working is what produces gluten. The higher the protein percentage, the 'tougher' (due to the gluten) the final product. Always use cake or pastry flour ...


5

A few tips from personal experience: Stop cooking your brownies when a toothpick inserted about 3 inches from a corner toward the center comes out clean, not when the center necessarily comes out clean. 2.Make sure your batter is at room temperature before you start baking to promote even cooking. Make sure you've added enough fat. A good amount of liquid ...


5

If it was just a few drops of water, keep mixing for two or three minutes while keeping the chocolate warm. The water will evaporate and the chocolate will remix. If it is more water, use it as @JustRightMenus suggested.


5

My guess is what is happening is that the baking powder is rising properly, but without the egg, there isn't enough to set and hold the brownies in shape. So it collapses back down as soon as the baking powder finishes reacting. You could try replacing the egg with flax seeds, tofu, soy yogurt, or bananas. Edit: Also try using a little less baking powder, ...


5

We store them at room temperature. If only for 3-4 few days: under plastic wrap or in the microwave. If about a week: in sealed Tupperware to keep the humidity from getting to them. I don't know if the humidity is an issue for everyone or only for those of us in a very humid climate. The refrigerator will make them last even longer but they won't taste as ...


5

I've been using bananas in 100% of my brownies the last 3 years with much success. It also has the added advantage that your brownies have a gentle banana flavor to them as well, which IMHO fits perfect with every kind of brownie in existence. I generally use 1-2 (about 8 in / 20cm in length) but sometimes use 3-4 for that extra banana kick. nom nom.


5

Brownies are bar cookies. Note that the brownies are at the edge of the pan are more cooked, and raised higher: they set before they settle back down. Baking the brownies in a mini-muffin tin will essentially make each mini-brownie all edge. They will rise and set very rapidly, and then easily over bake. I would suggest that brownies are not ideal in a ...


5

No, you can use the blender. Use the slowest speed and manually do short pulses (1 second on, 2 seconds off). You may have to use a spatula and mix it to get an even result. The pauses are so that the food doesn't get too hot (friction from the blades can actually boil things). Stop early, it's easy to make an unrecognizable paste in the blender.


4

Oven Temperature Most ovens keep inaccurate temperatures with respect to your setting. You may be setting it to 350, but it could be baking at 375. I would suggest investing in an oven thermometer. I've seen these for a dollar--well worth the investment. Baking Vessel I was surprised to find this out, but the pan color actually affects heat conduction. If ...


4

America's Test Kitchen (AKA Cook's Illustrated) took on exactly this issue. They were looking for both that chewy texture and that shiny, crusty, crackly top. Good boxed brownie mixes achieve those qualities, but lack the intense chocolaty taste of homemade. They tried different mixing methods. They tried melting the butter, creaming the butter, and ...


4

You could also try breaking it into small chunks and soaking it with espresso or a liqueur like cointreau or amaretto. That should soften it up nicely and would taste great made into an ice cream sundae or trifle.


4

I can't select either of the above answers as the best answer for the following reason: The brownie I'm making is meant to be "gooey", and even after cooling for 2 hours, and then chilling in the fridge for another 30 minutes, the the upper-half brownie still remained fudge-like. I ended up using Jay's suggestion to eye-ball a 4x4 grid, however I didn't use ...


4

Your oven temp may be off - check your oven temp. Get an oven thermometer and check your temp.


4

As you noticed, white chocolate doesn't have the same fat or solid makeup as regular chocolate, and in baking that will make a huge difference. The proportions of starch/binder (flour) to fat (butter & chocolate) to protein (eggs) are what make the difference between cake, brownie, fudge and everything in between. White chocolate tends to melt faster ...


4

Food processors are wonderful kitchen tools, but they have only existed for a relatively short while. The techniques used prior to their invention still work, but are much more labor intensive. Use a food mill. Use a mortar and pestle. The results can then be forced through a sieve of chinoise if desired to get a smoother result. You have not ...


4

The two labels are referring to entirely different aspects of the chocolate, and are completely unrelated. Semi-sweet refers to the approximate amount of cacoa solids versus sugar in the chocolate. Belgian refers to the location of the processing plant where the cocao beans were processed into chocolate. The label for your chocolate should indicate a ...


3

Depending on the size of the cupcake tin you may have to increase or decrease the cooking times and temperature. My favorite "brownie disguised as a cupcake" recipe is from Paula Deen - http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/paula-deen/peanut-butter-brownie-cupcakes-recipe/index.html


3

You could always frost the brownies, or you could also sprinkle powdered sugar with a sieve over the top to add a little extra sweetness.


3

Did you try commercial "Egg replacer" that's available in health food stores or did you use another replacement? While I don't have a specific "sure thing" option for your question, a good resource for special diets due to the major allergies (gluten, soy, eggs, dairy, etc.) is Living Without magazine. They have a page on their website with recommended ...



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