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24

I finally found what I'm looking for, from the University of Michigan - some actual data on the subject! They say that rinsing canned beans can reduce the amount of sodium by half, and also reduces the amount of complex sugars which humans can't digest (but the bacteria in our intestines can, with uncomfortable results!) It appears that draining the fluid ...


21

You can reuse parchment paper several times for your cookies (it also works for other dry dishes), depending on cooking time and temperature, with no problem. Change the paper when it gets dirty, dark and/or brittle as it may crumble beyond this point. I always do so with no difference in the results, saving both on money and waste.


20

I'm in the same situation as you are, I'm a college student on a budget. What you need to do is convince yourself that it's better to cook your own food. I accomplish this by tracking how much I spend on food at the grocery store each week, and comparing it to buying fast food. I've been doing this since Summer of 2010 and trust me, cooking yourself is a lot ...


18

I am going to slightly disagree with the other two answers. First, here is an excerpt summarizing Alton Brown's opinion: The first step in learning how to cook with spices is learning where to find spices. Now here in America, we do have some indigenous spices: allspice, vanilla, chili peppers, all from here. But by and large, most of your culinary ...


17

Donuts are a deep fried food. The texture of deep fried food is unique and cannot be duplicated by other methods. If you bake doughnut dough, you will get small rolls, which will have a similar aroma, but not the same combination of moist, soft inside and fat-crispy outside. You could bake it, as with any other yeast dough, only nobody will recognize it as a ...


14

It takes quite a while for a pot of hot soup to cool down to 40°F in the fridge. Several hours, sometimes, depending on the shape of the pot and the volume of soup. If you're heating and re-chilling the same soup daily, it's going to spend a lot of time in the danger zone. From a safety perspective, you'd be much better off making a pot of soup every few ...


13

I like Kryptic's suggestions, and would add: learn to make some very simple dishes that take say 5 ingredients, make good use of inexpensive grains and beans, and learn how to make simple stir-fries and other dishes that can easily be made for just 1 person. Example menus: White rice cooked with salsa, reheat a can of black or pinto beans, shredded cheese, ...


13

Prices are determined not by the cost of the raw materials of anything, but by what the consumer is willing to pay. Anything that must be sold at a loss because of this is simply not sold/manufactured. In my experience, the specialty Asian stores (in the UK), or the spice shops and market stalls in other parts of the world usually have better tasting (and ...


9

I've had great results with flank steak. Best to marinate it with a mix of salt, sugar/honey, vinegar/lemon/lime, water/whiskey/tequila/soda, olive oil, spices, and herbs for at least a few hours before grilling. More salt will help tenderize but can't be left too long at too high concentrations (search "brining"). Don't overcook it, of course, ...


9

Fundamentally, I see this as a problem with procrastination, not planning or personal finance. It's really not that hard to thumb through a recipe book and find a few recipes with common ingredients, or simply choose recipes where you know you can use all or almost all of the fresh ingredients at once. None of that is going to help you if you are waiting ...


8

The general answer is that you use a loaf pan if you want the common rectangular loaf shape (it's good for slicing for toast and sandwiches), and otherwise you don't need one. For example, the link you gave for french bread completely describes how to shape and bake the loaf. There's no wrapping in foil or anything; you coax it into that shape, and it's ...


7

What country are you in? Every country has some edible insects. Most are terrible. some are toxic, or have toxic parts that must be removed first. This knowledge is hard won, and not readily available. Traditional local people are your best source of information (though the Coke and McD's culture has killed that in most parts of the world) In New Zealand ...


7

Notice how dogs enjoy gnawing on bones? Ever been to a restaurant where they serve bone marrow? Boiling bones in water draws flavor out of them. Most canned broth and stock you buy--beef stock, chicken stock, etc--is just this--water boiled with bones for hours. Most literature I've read suggests using raw bones, but some recipes call for roasted ...


7

Grana padano and pecorino romano are two other very savory, hard grating cheeses that work well on pasta. They taste a bit different than Parmigiano-Reggiano, but are quite good in their own right and often less expensive. You can also look at parmesan type cheeses that are not actually Parmigiano-Reggiano. For example, Whole Foods often has one from ...


7

Officially, its unsafe. This is largely due to the fact that the time spent in "the danger zone" is cumulative. You may be killing off bacteria, but during their lifespan they may release toxins and spores that you may not kill. Every time you reheat the bits of leftovers, they're adding up time in the 'danger zone'. Addionally, soup is only good in the ...


7

Oil can be re-used multiple times, especially of you have a deep fryer. Alternatively, you can use an oil filter to reclaim oil after usage. I'm not sure where the "waste" you speak of is coming from. [Edit] While I have never noticed a particular issue with oil carrying over a 'sweet' flavor after frying doughnuts I have not done a lot of doughnuts. If I ...


6

I don't know if insects are really a great viable alternative for touring. You'd need to collect a lot of them to make a decent meal and it would take a decent amount of time and energy, but with that in mind on to the actual question: There are plenty of ways to cook insects. You can toast them, fry them, grind them and mix with other stuff, etc. With the ...


6

What you really need is to learn to cook with things that don't go bad. Get a supply of spices, some pastas, canned goods (tomato sauce!), rice, etc... This kind of stuff can stay in the cupboard (not the fridge) for years before going bad. Get some long lasting condiments. Soy sauce, mayo, catsup, stuff like that. Get some small amounts of semi-long ...


6

I notice Flank steak already made the list, and once I would have agreed, but it's gotten trendy, and with the trendiness, expensive. It's still not fillet-price, but it tends to run in the 7-8 dollar a pound range where I live. The steak I like to grill that I find to be tasty, cheap, and available is skirt steak. Do a light marinade, grill it as lightly ...


6

The real stuff is expensive because it's still actually cheese. If you're gonna use the canned stuff, you're probably better off just leaving it out entirely (or sprinkling it on top at the table as-desired...) It doesn't take a lot of cheese either - it's pretty strong stuff. You can probably get away with just a few ounces...


5

Are you absolutely certain that the "grittiness" is caused by the cheese not melting, and not because the sauce is curdling? If you cook it too long or too fast, that is what will happen. If you must use the Kraft stuff (personally, I think it has no flavour compared to real Reggiano), try melting the cheese on low heat in a very small amount of cream ...


5

It depends on the time of year (and, of course, sales). One book I read said that since many chicken farmers raise extra birds to be slaughtered around holidays (Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter are the big ones), often they'll have shortages of smaller eggs (which often come from smaller chickens) around those times. Since USDA regulations give a ...


5

The lowest-cost option is definitely bones, assuming you don't actually need or want pieces of meat in the soup. When I say bones I'm referring to the parts that are normally thrown out as waste products, especially the necks, feet, and carcasses. If you can't find them at a supermarket, talk to a butcher. They are sold for next to nothing - usually less ...


5

Decent port is not necessarily expensive; you may find yourself spending more on the meat. For example, Sandeman's Founders Reserve 750 ml runs about US$15 before taxes, Dow's Fine Tawny 750 ml is about US$13, and Graham's Six Grapes Ruby 750 ml is about US$8 (and this is just the start of the list). These are, perhaps, not the connoisseur's choices, but ...


5

Assuming you don't want to do Uncle Ben's or Kraft Mac n' Cheeze in the microwave... I would go with aluminum foil. For example, do a potato and root veggie foil packet. Add some fresh rosemary, thyme, oregano, whatever's on hand. Salt, pepper, garlic, oil, maybe a little wine, all wrapped up in foil. Throw in the oven and bake. I do it all the time on the ...


5

Make Raised Donuts instead of Cake Donuts The reason for this is that raised donuts don't have any sweeteners added to the dough, so will not leave any sweetness or anything on the oil. Alternately, you could make cake donuts without putting sugar in the dough, and instead glaze or powder them as normally done with raised donuts. Use Shortening, not Oil ...


4

OOOH! I finally get to share the alfredo sauce recipe I developed for low fatness and good flavor, adapted in part from bechamil sauce out of Joy of Cooking: 1/2 cup flour 1/2 cup X virgin olive oil Preheat oven to 250 degrees F / 100 degrees C Set your oven proof pan (use one that has a good cover) corning ware can be used for this, on a burner set to ...


4

You should be able to get good results with any steak cut: ribeye, porterhouse, strip, sirloin, t-bone. If you can't, there is something wrong with your process that needs to be fixed. Make sure the steak is all the way thawed. Either coat the steak with salt for 1 hour before grilling, or marinate in an acidic liquid (lemon juice, wine, marinade with ...


4

This is an old question, but for the sake of completeness: Parmesan, even the high-end stuff, really doesn't melt well. I've found that in any sauce containing it, it's got to be grated as finely as possible, or you get little globules of it that won't ever dissolve. That's tough to do with pre-grated Kraft cheese, but if you can find a good price on block ...


4

The price of genuine-sealed-and-certified parmagiano reggiano is quite high and fairly consistent, especially for more aged varieties. I think your best bet to save money will be to use a similar parmagiano reggiano cousin, such as grana padano, romano, or a quality Argentinian reggianito. As a second-tier approach, you might look at domestic Parmesan, but ...



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