Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

This a a great video that explains every step. She cuts the head off by slicing above the eyes, so removing the beak is a part of cleaning the tentacles. These are your first cuts. Cut the head off above the eyes, and slit the head open. Rinse out the guts, there will be some connective tissue that needs to be cut away or broken to get to all of the ...


6

The simplest way to see the difference is to compare the cut diagrams: British French Images courtesy of Wikipedia The main difference is in how certain areas are sub-divided. We can see that faux-filet is part of the British sirloin, and entrecote is partly forerib and partly sirloin.


5

Your best choices would be top sirloin (#1 choice), tenderloin, or one of the other (less expensive) sirloin cuts. Those cuts will be tender, flavorful, and without pockets of fat or gristle to mar the appearance of your dish. I don't recommend round because I simply don't like its flavor. Using round in this application might be one of the best ...


4

The USDA NAL has this to say: Refuse: 20% Refuse Description: Bone In addition, you can compare the serving size weight of the breast with skin (145 g) to the weight of the breast with meat only (118 g), each derived from 1/2 chicken breast, so the skin accounts for about 18.6% of the deboned breast and 14.9% of the bone-in breast (accounting for ...


4

The tentacles and the muscular body of the squid are edible. To clean squid, pull the head and tentacles off the body and remove the skin and fins from the body. Turn the body inside-out, remove the central bone, wash out the inside of the body, and turn the body back into its original shape. Cut the tentacles off of the head, and discard the head and ...


4

If you're just separating a chicken into pieces, you don't need to cut through any bone, and a chef's knife or a boning knife will work fine. You need to aim for the joints in between the bones, and cut the softer connective tissue. If you're actually trying to hack legs and thighs into pieces (some indian curries, stocks, and other preparations do well ...


4

A suckling pig would have the same cuts as an adult, but they would obviously be much smaller and thus fiddlier to butcher. Wikipedia reports that suckling pig meat is also quite gelatinous, so you might take all the time to butcher the thing and end up with meat you don't want to eat. You could always start with half a pig, since they are obviously ...


4

Lucky you. I usually have all the shoulders split in two, cured and smoked, hocks and shanks smoked, belly smoked (bacon). Some roasts and the rest into chops and steaks. Your cut and wrap (butcher) will put things up the way you ask, so have him put up meal size bits. The usual way to receive custom cut and wraped meat is frozen, haven't heard of anyone ...


3

I would base my decision on when you plan on eating it... If you'll be eating it in the next 2 or 3 weeks, then I would have it sliced to what your ultimate goal. Larger chunks of meat should store better, so if you plan on storing it for awhile I would have it cut into larger slabs and then shave off what you need when you need it... I don't know if ...


3

As you can see here, you can do it with a chef's knife. I think you must try to cut between bones or around them, not through them. Gristle shouldn't be a problem for your knife.


3

Alton Brown demonstrates using a piece of string to scrape the bone clean. First he cuts and trims the bulk of the meat down to where he wants it. Then, he uses a string tied to a garage door handle (very cheap at any hardware store). Loop it around the bone a couple of times and pull, and it cleans it right up.


3

Get rid of the beak, internal shell, and the innards. The rest is edible, tentacles and all.


3

What really matters is the fat content. I suspect that being all thigh meat, it's similar to regular ground turkey, which is 85% lean. Ground turkey breast (or "extra lean" ground turkey) is 99% lean. I've also seen mixtures in the store of light and dark ground meat that clocked in at 93% lean to split the difference. Jennie-O, a large national producer ...


2

Based on your comments, the likely issue is with the pliers you're using. I doubt that the relatively small set included in a multi-function knife is going to have enough grip to hang on to a slippery tendon. I'd try a pair of (very, very clean) needle-nose pliers, like so: They're readily available and inexpensive, so it's probably worth getting a ...


2

A technique that I've seen is to score the skin in strips on the outside and then cut and peel the skin like a band-aid with a sharp knife (paring or boning) aiding the separation. I'm not a butcher, but last time we cured meat, we (two people) went through 100 lbs of fresh meat meticulously in about 20 minutes using this method (the other person was a ...


2

Veal and beef cuts are completely different, the terminology is not the same at all. With veal the tendron is part of the breast, which includes the foreleg and the front of what would be considered the flank on a full-sized animal, in other words the part that does the most work. The tendron cut includes the lower-front part of the ribs. As for what to ask ...


2

Depends what sort of "chicken" you want to make. If you roast chicken on a rack or rotisserie and make some slashes in the skin, most of the surplus trimable fat will drip away during cooking. Most of the visible fat is directly under the skin Other form of cooking generally do not allow enough fat to drip away, so skinning and trimming is the answer ...


2

The nature of veal, being a milk fed calf, means that the meat is going to be extremely fatty. It is the nature of the meat and not a function of poor butchering. If you don't like the flavor I would suggest that almost anything that calls for veal can be made with pork chops or other lean cuts of pork, although you might see a rise in the toughness of the ...


2

I've never seen it done but with a knife. Cut the meat down to where you want it, and then scrape, scrape, scrape. I've seen people do it with all kinds of knives, but I like a nice thin boning knife.


1

There are a few ways to get less fat from your chicken: Cooking method (rack/rotisserie mentioned above) Eat only the white meat (less fat) Remove the skin when you eat it (some fat remains in the skin) Eat less of it (easy fix) Raise your own chickens (and avoid feeding them grains)



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible