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34

Well, frying means to cook in oil, so technically you can't. Fat also is delicious, so you'll lose something in the process besides just calories. If you are using teflon, ceramic, or some other non-stick, don't bring the heat up too much. Scrambling your eggs with milk will make them more fluffy, and I bet less likely to stick. Use (sigh) PAM or another ...


28

Butter and margarine freeze perfectly. I generally stock up during sales and thaw it as needed. You just have to make sure it's wrapped tightly in the foil, to prevent oxidation. It'll keep at least 6 months, probably more if you don't have a self-defrosting freezer. Thawing butter does take quite a while, however. I usually give a package a few days to ...


27

You can heat clarified butter to a higher temperature for two reasons -- you remove the milk solids, which can burn, and you remove the water, which will boil at 100°C and cause spattering. In baking, clarified butter's lack of water means that it can't develop gluten as you would with simple melted butter. It's actually more similar to other oils than it ...


25

Creaming puts the air bubbles into the mixture. The baking powder only helps enlarge the bubbles, not make them. In cookies the creaming plays another essential role, which is to help dissolve the sugar. To cream the butter keep it cool and do it for a few minutes (at 65°F, harder in the summer). It has recently been discovered that cookie dough is ...


21

If you want to turn your cold butter spreadable quickly, patience is about your only option. You can try microwaving it very briefly, and maybe on the "defrost" setting, but you run a strong risk of melting it too much. If I'm thinking of the same thing you are, a butter conditioner is really just a unit that allows you to keep your butter in the fridge but ...


20

It depends on the room temperature where you live. At 65F (18C) or below, butter is often barely spreadable and will last for weeks on the counter in a sealed container. At 80F (26C), it starts to get overly soft and doesn't last more than several days. Our family goes through about a pound / week and we've never had any issues with keeping a half-pound ...


18

Butter and cooking oil are not interchangeable in every recipe. Butter actually has water in it, while oil is a pure lipid. This can cause problems with water-sensitive preparations, for example a choux paste (where the proper ratio of water to flour is extremely important) or anything using melted chocolate (where the water in butter can cause it to ...


17

To get your butter up to room temperature faster, you can slice it into very small pieces or grate it with a cheese grater and then leave it out in a single layer. It will get where you want it in around 10 minutes that way. You cookies taste better with room temperature butter because they have more air in them. When you mix the butter, sugar and eggs in ...


16

There are two things you care about when you are making a cake. First, ratio. Second, sequence. The ratio is a weight ratio. For example, a muffin batter has 2 parts flour, 2 pars liquid, 1 part egg, and 1 part fat. You can use different types of liquid to make different kinds of muffins. You can make any amount of batter you want, provided you use keep ...


15

Depending on brand, it is approximately 1 1/4 tsp per pound (US), or a little more than 1/4 tsp per stick (4 oz). For most applications, yes it is fine to substitute and adjust; you can just adjust the "salt to taste" step of your recipe in many cases. There are a very few uses (such as yeast raised dough) where you want to be more precise. I would not ...


14

Butter can go bad. The oils will go rancid if exposed to too much light and heat for too long. This accelerates the process of oxidation, which happens even if you keep the butter in the fridge. Even in the fridge your butter will eventually go bad. Personally I follow the dates on all packages. I do so with an awareness that they usually tend to be ...


14

Actually, the question should be "why do other dairy products spoil so fast?" If I remember correctly, the spoilage of milk is caused primarily by lactose, which breaks down into lactic acid over time due to the presence of Lactobacillus bacteria, which thrive in that environment. Butter is mostly fat, and fat does not go bad (it does eventually, but not ...


13

If the ice cream mix is setting up but tending to leave a buttery coating in your mouth the best thing would be to try cutting back on the cream and replacing it with whole milk or half & half. If it's a recipe that you've used in another machine with great success but it doesn't seem to in this one, it's probably a case of how long the frozen bowl is ...


12

Clarified butter is rather simple to make. It's simply butter that has had the milk solids and water removed. It does last longer than regular butter, and can be stored for several weeks in the refrigerator. It also has a higher smoke point than regular butter, so you can use it when higher temperatures are called for without it smoking or burning. Slowly ...


12

The usual explanation given is that adding butter to the fruit and sugar before you cook it will reduce (or even eliminate) the foaming. My guess is that the small amount of proteins in the fruits create the foam. As you heat the fruit, the proteins open up into strands that get tangled up and help stabilize the bubbles into a foam. Adding the butter (a ...


12

There's softened vs. melted ... From what you're describing, I'm not sure exactly which one you're refering to. For softened, unfortunately, the best way really is just to leave it out at room temperature for a few hours; if you're in a rush, cutting it into chunks, and placing it somewhere warm (near the stove, but not on it, and rotate the bowl it's in so ...


12

Basically, when recipies call for softened butter, they use the creaming method; the sugar and butter are mixed together in such a way that the sugar cuts little air bubbles into the butter. These little bubbles can add some extra puff to the cookies. If you melt the butter first, not only do you not have those air bubbles, but there's water in butter, so ...


12

Hah, I get to cite my new copy of McGee's "On Food and Cooking" for the first time! There are several things going on here (all of which can be found in the 2004 edition of McGee, most on page 50). Firstly, as Nathan indicates in his answer, most of the liquid that is sold as buttermilk these days is in fact not "real" buttermilk, but so-called "cultured ...


11

I guess it depends on what the substitution is for. Certainly if the butter is just for flavour, it's a reasonable substitute (I think I'd use slightly more yogurt). But 9 times out of 10, fat is the main reason the recipe is calling for butter! Yogurt cannot substitute for a fat (butter) because it has very little fat. If you lower the fat content of a ...


11

In this Gordon Ramsey scrambled eggs video he uses a "knob" of butter. It appears to be about 2 Tbsp. I don't think it's intended to be a specific term. You'd never see "knob" used for baking, where exact amounts matter. When cooking, recipes tend to be a general guideline rather than a strict set of instructions.


11

Butter, like most fats, is actually quite resilient to microbes. The problem you are more likely to experience is rancidity. Fat goes rancid by oxidation. Exposure to light, heat, and air cause oxidation and accelerate the process of butter going rancid. Putting butter in your refrigerator addresses the heat and light, but does nothing for the air. The ...


11

Margarine has less fat than butter, but it doesn't give quite the same flavor as butter does. You also have to be careful what KIND of margarine you are using. Tub margarine has a higher water content and can ruin your baked goods and the stick margarine can have a lot of trans fats in it. If you really want to get detailed into the differences, check out ...


11

Butter is about 80% milkfat, and 20% water, more or less. 3/4 stick is 6 tablespoons. You should be able to substitute six tablespoons of coconut oil one to one. It should be well within the tolerance of the recipe. If you really want to account for the water, you would do about 5 tbl of coconut oil, and 1 tbl of liquid.


11

I am skeptical that butter from yogurt is a thing. When yogurt is made the milk proteins denature and form a mesh that traps all the large molecules in the milk. Water, sugar, and some small molecules can come out but the fat never does- it's huge and tightly bound up in the gel. Even when yogurt is blended up the whey will separate out but the fat never ...


11

Very, very few pizzas are made with butter. There is no way to make a universal statement, but butter is a rare. Olive oil would be more likely. Many pizza doughs are fat-free, including the traditional pizza di napoli; New York style generally contains olive oil. It is rare for any traditional toppings to contain butter. Some individual cooks might ...


10

I can think of at least three things that will cause chocolate to seize - which refers to when melted or melting chocolate suddenly becomes hard again: Using too high a heat. Double-boiler is the safest, but you can use a saucepan on very low heat. Sugar bloom and other impurities. You shouldn't get this with baker's chocolate, but if you use any ...


10

Take double cream (you want a 48% milk fat, which is hard to get in the U.S. outside of a specialty market; heavy cream has a 30-40% milk fat content) and shake it. Forever. To be more specific, after sealing your double cream in, say, a jam jar, shake it until you hear the sloshing sound of butter forming (which will take anywhere from 15 minutes to an ...


10

The question seems to have been more about food safety than whether it seems palatable. When the fat in butter decomposes (i.e. when the butter becomes rancid), it produces an unhealthy acid that actually inhibits mold growth. So, don't wait for your butter to mold to determine if it's gone bad. To follow strict food-safety guidelines, protect butter ...


10

I don't know about weather, but non-factory produced milk changes with the season because of the feed, which will affect your butter. Over the winter, the cows are fed hay or corn, while over the summer, they're pastured, so get fresh grass. In the Netherlands, there are designations such as 'graskaas' (literally, 'grass chesse'), which is made from the ...



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