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2

One job as an an apprentice baker in Germany was to prepare the butter for the next day's croissants by mixing in 10% flour by weight. This was to make it more pliable and less likely to break through the dough layers. that was our pastry butter at any rate


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Most of the aromatic compounds contained in vanilla are highly volatile and / or degrade in high heat, so I would add the vanilla after caramelization.


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Pastry professionals use a variety of different butters for different recipes or tasks, as cakes, croissants, buttercream and gelato have different needs in terms of plasticity and melting point. For example, a local vendor sells six different types of butter (not counting clarified), with melting point varying between 29-40 °C (84-104 °F). Croissants ...


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Put it on a plate and mash it out with a fork It will quickly come to the temp of the plate


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Body heat. You're a balmy 98.6 or so degrees, so put the packet of butter in your pocket and leave your hand on it. In a minute or two, it'll be soft enough to spread. Plus, you don't have to pester your server for anything additional, it should help you save the odd requests for when you really need their help :)


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Richard Bertinet softens butter for baking by covering it with the waxed, foil wrapper and pounding it with a rolling pin. Even cold butter becomes pliable with a few dozen wallops. That's for big 250g blocks of butter and it makes a racket, but I wondered if you could do a small-scale version. Try this: take a square of greaseproof paper to the ...


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Ask for a heated glass! Glasses freshly out of cleaning should be warm anyway, so chances are they have one. Putting the heated glass over your (opened) piece of butter unter the turned-over glass should have the desired effect.


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It's possible that they just meant, "a butter that is suited to making pastries". That is, a firmer butter compared to other butters. Some info here (I am not the author) Certainly, firmness is a factor of temperature. However it’s also a factor of the butter’s fatty acid makeup, and as I wrote yesterday, that’s largely determined by the breed of the ...


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No, it will not. Butter which has melted once will never again be the same after it resolidifies, so recipes assume you use butter which has never been melted. Also, when you try to warm up cold butter or also cool down warm butter quickly, the result seldom do well in baking, you get some weird behaviors like butter which smears instead of creaming well. ...


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A mix of clarified and ordinary unsalted butter works well. I used clarified butter that was simmered for a long time to be sure the water was thoroughly removed, just to the point where it stops sputtering, and the solids in the bottom begin to brown. If the unsalted butter has a fat content of 80% and clarified near 100%, then a 20% clarified to 80% ...



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