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2

There's a recipe I saw a while ago that uses butter that's thoroughly incorporated into the flour instead of the usual cold chunks. I think it creates a butter/flour paste, then cuts fresh flour into it just prior to adding the water (the idea being that instead of layers of tricky-to-work-with pure butter separating layers of water-dough, you would have ...


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Yep, you can fry anything in just butter. You only need to know that whole butter has a lower smoke-point (~350F,177C) than a lot of other oils, so it needs to be done a bit slowly. See this Smoke Point Chart: (the last column involves fatty acids, not relevant here) Higher smoke points of course mean the oil can get hotter without burning. For what it is ...


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Not knowing your recipe (but I did some general googling re. fat bombs in general), I'd say go for it. The main differences are based on the higher melting point for cocoa butter, which can actually make storage easier. At the same temperature, the cocoa butter based treats will be firmer - again a matter of taste. But: The coconut oil based fat bombs ...


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when making bread we also add fat after mixing all the other ingredients. fat or butter is added later because it can hinder water absorption if added with the other ingredients at the beginning.


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Assuming you mean something like a wing-sauce when you say hot sauce (where butter is added to pepper sauce near the end of the recipe): It would make only a slight difference, and many tasters will find no flavor difference. A clarified butter is a butter with water removed---it changes the richness to some extent, but this will be mostly masked by the ...



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