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5

I believe you're referring to a compound butter. They usually contain butter and herbs such as sage, parsley, rosemary, thyme, etc., salt, and occasionally lemon, pepper and/or garlic. For steak it might also include a strongly flavored soft cheese such as a blue cheese such as stilton or gorgonzola (my favorite, but my wife hates it). For example: Alton ...


4

It all comes down to "creaming". When you mix granulated sugar with solid (cold or cool) butter (creaming), the volume increases thanks to little-itty-bitty bubbles in the fat. That creates a kind of leavening. The bubbles get bigger as the item bakes. Melted butter doesn't do that at all, and very softened butter does it very little. So, different ...


3

I would say no for two main reasons, the butter will change texture as the dessert cools, and I don't think the oil will, so the mousse will split. Also the tastes will be off. You could try margarine, or at a real push lard (you would need to play around with the sugars to keep the sweetness) However I have seen recipies that exclude butter, here is a ...


0

You might want to try clarified butter, it has negligible amounts of lactose and casein. Since they use it in Indian cuisine (they call it ghee) I reckon it should not cause problems to lactose intolerant people (like most people living in Asia are). It doesn't have the same rich flavor as regular butter, but in my opinion it is still better tasting than ...


0

I concur with the other posters. Make a sauce. I actually am fond of making tomato sauces with the fat residue left in frying pans. Sometimes I use a jar of pasta sauce which with the fat makes a great sauce. You can also use general canned tomatoes. Even things like onion relish can be really good when made with this. Dont be afraid to use some flower to ...


3

Sure, why not? It probably won't turn out quite like the stuff you get at the store, but all you need is cream, a way to churn air into it, and enough agitation that the milk fat molecules start to clump together. It will require some manual work once you've got the butter and buttercream separated. But the food processor will get you most of the way there ...


1

Disclaimer I'm only speaking from my own experience. I am no authority on the topic of butter, but I do have some experience with it left at room temperature for good amounts of time. My experience When I was growing up, my parents would always leave butter at room temperature. Although, it was about one pound at a time. Refrigerated butter is unpleasant ...


2

I would try to solve this with a couple of extra flips early on in the cooking process. When perparing similar dishes I put the product in the pan for about 30 seconds, then flip them over and slide them along the surface of the pan to pick up the butter remaining on the pan's surface. It does mean having to flip your meat four times instead of two, but in ...


-1

It's absolutely no problem to replace butter with margarine in cookies and actually in any other kind of dough. Just substitute butter with margarine keeping the same proportion.


0

When I make panko-crusted chicken tenders, I use a two-step process that produces even browning: Toast the panko breadcrumbs in the oven, in a thin layer spread across a baking sheet, until they are browned. Prepare your breaded chicken using the pre-toasted crumbs, and finish in the oven rather than on the stovetop (use a baking rack rather than a sheet ...


2

I have a family member who is lactose intolerant, and we often substitute margarine (or various oils) for butter in cooking. We've found that this is mostly interchangeable, but can be unpredictable in baking due to different melting properties. Also, as Marti noted in a comment below, it's a challenge to find unsalted margarine (important if directly ...



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