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Often finding exotic ingredients means determining which cultures use that ingredient, determining where there's a high concentration of immigrants from those regions, and checking for stores in that area. In this particular case, we know that yak is a staple of Nepalese cuisine, and searching for Nepalese restaurants in New York City, we find a cluster of ...


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1.When cooking the pasta, keep some of the water before draining them. 2. When mixing in the ingredients, add a little bit of the water, so that the ingredients make a sauce instead of just cloying together. For step 2, you need to take your time; toss the ingredients and the pasta together for a couple of minutes. You need to use a hot pan to mix the ...


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When melting butter and chocolate together in microwave, I have found that starting with FROZEN butter does not work well. (I guess that is because the butter needs to melt before the chocolate.) Using frozen butter results in separation of butter and chocolate, separation of the batter, and even separation of the final baked product (creating an oily ...


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It depends on the recipe but, clarifying butter removes fat, milk, sugar, etc from the butter. Leaving a pure (clean) product. Clarifying it will remove any likelyhood of contamination (spoilage) and will reduce separation. Try cooking green beans (or any veggie) in a pot with water and add a significant amount of butter, then put it in the fridge ...


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I have read applesauce could be a great substitute for butter in baking. Its 68 calories per 100g, which is less than a tenth of the calories you would get from margarine and without the trans fat. The ratio from what I have read is 1:1 to butter.


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In the UK we don't have Earth Balance, and often DF margerine on it's own is too soft, even when chilled: I find a mix of dairy-free margarine and vegetable shortening works - I've not made pastry yet, however for "buttercream" icing I do a 50/50 mixture. Hope this helps!


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En pomade is a French term used in cooking. It means "the consistency of hair pomade" For your recipe, it means to whip/cream the butter until smooth.


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Pros: Higher smoking point. Regular butter's smoking point is 325-375F while clarified butter is around 485F. But it can still smoke and burn! However the higher smoking point means it'll be much more applicable in terms of sauteing food without worrying about burning the butter. 100% fat. Often times its hard to calculate the exact replacements in baking ...


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There are good quality vegan margarines (Earth balance, Alsan) on the market nowadays, often they are of the interesterified instead of the hydrogenated variety. They are designed to behave and taste similar to butter instead of (as many cheap margarines seem to do) staying spreadable at temperatures where butter would be very firm. Unlike pure coconut or ...


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Here are the players: butter (~80% fat) margarine (~80% fat) vegetable oil spread (less than 80% fat) shortening (100% fat) I only list it that way, because some people think a vegetable oil spread = margarine. It is not. If you substitute an oil spread for butter, you could have problems. My experience is that butter and true margarine can be ...



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