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20

There are a few possibilities: 1 cup milk plus 1 Tbsp lemon juice or white vinegar, let stand for 10 minutes 1 cup milk plus 2 tsp cream of tartar, let stand for 10 minutes 2 parts plain yogurt to 1 part milk Plain, low-fat yogurt Sour cream Molasses (if batter requires baking soda) I have used the first two with success. Source: Cook's Thesaurus


18

You are correct that in the US buttermilk refers to cultured milk and not the soured leftovers from making butter. Historically buttermilk was the liquid left after making butter that had fermented during the accumulation of the cream. It was described as milky and sour- not creamy like modern buttermilk. Your recipe is certainly referring to the cultured ...


15

Technically, this is not precisely buttermilk, but it's pretty close in both composition and usage. The term "buttermilk" can actually refer to a wide range of fermented milk varieties. Traditionally, buttermilk was produced by allowing natural bacteria present in cream to ferment some of the sugar lactose into lactic acid. This made churning butter from ...


12

You can use the aforementioned substitutions for buttermilk but keep in mind that they will produce a slightly different flavor due to the types of acids and their flavor profiles: -Buttermilk = lactic acid -Lemon juice = citric acid -Vinegar = acetic acid Chemically they will work the same however. Sour cream or yogurt thinned with milk to the ...


12

Hah, I get to cite my new copy of McGee's "On Food and Cooking" for the first time! There are several things going on here (all of which can be found in the 2004 edition of McGee, most on page 50). Firstly, as Nathan indicates in his answer, most of the liquid that is sold as buttermilk these days is in fact not "real" buttermilk, but so-called "cultured ...


11

Buttermilk is already thoroughly packed with live bacteria. During its manufacture, that bacteria already consumed some portion of the available lactose and turned it into lactic acid. Because of the lack of food, acidity, and the extreme competition it is pretty hard for buttermilk to go bad. The good bacteria will stay active and the buttermilk will get ...


10

Mold doesn't grow that fast in a refrigerator overnight. I'd bet some ingredient reacted with your baking powder or baking soda. I've seen something similar before in three separate circumstances: instant oatmeal that turned blue when mixed with iodine-treated water (day after day on a camping trip); garlic mixed with yogurt turns blue when heated; ...


9

It is true that Saco Buttermilk Blend contains no live cultures. If you can have any further questions, please feel free to call our consumer line at 1-800-373-7226. We are happy to answer any questions you may have about our product! Amy Verheyden Director of Consumer Affairs Saco Foods, Inc.


9

Buttermilk has a delicious flavor that is not at all approximated by lemon juice. It's true that lemon or vinegar with milk will clabber it a little and provide the acid that the recipe needs but the flavor will be distinctly lacking. Get some buttermilk. It's inexpensive and has a longer shelf life than normal milk. It is also exceptionally easy to make. ...


9

Two things: First, commercially available buttermilk is actually milk that has been slightly cultured to increase the amount of lactic acid; that's why it tastes tart. My grandmother used to make 'buttermilk' by leaving some milk on the counter to let it ferment. Because of the increased amount of acid, a lot of recipes (like buns or biscuits) mix ...


7

You'll want to look for one of two products either lait fermenté or lait ribot. Lait fermenté is a cultured buttermilk. This is homogenized and pasteurized milk which has been cultured with lactic acid bacteria. This is the de facto standard buttermilk in modern times. If you go to an American grocery store and buy buttermilk you are buying cultured ...


7

The baking soda and acid from the dried buttermilk should not react in any significant amount until you hydrate the mixture, so it should work. Remember, baking powder is acid and sodium bicarbonate in the same can, and there is little except acid and reactant; your mix will have a lot of buffer ingredients as well. I would not add the oil to the dry mix ...


7

Soy milk is bitter. Enzymes in the beans (lipoxygenase) combine with fats in the presence of water to produce what is usually described as a "beany flavor"; bitter and grassy. The solution to this problem, although not done in many traditional soy milk preparations, is to cook the soy milk long enough to destroy the enzyme. Many, but not all, soy milk ...


7

Know that the traditional Frank's Buffalo Wings Sauce is just Frank's RedHot and melted butter. I'd definitely start there, and tweak with the substitution. The old standard is 1/2 cup (118ml) Frank's RedHot to 1/3 cup (79ml) melted butter. Vinegar is a distinct possibility, to me neither buttermilk nor ketchup make sense. You might find this recipe for ...


5

No, it will not react. There is a bit of theory behind it. The reaction in batter is a reaction between a base and an acid. For this type of reaction, you need ions swimming freely in water. In dried substances, your ions are stuck to other ions to form molecules, or ion gitters, depending on the substance. They cannot react with anything, just like a pen ...


5

I've seen both milk + white vinegar or milk + lemon juice mentioned as substitutes. I've only tried the former, and that worked great. I've used a ratio of 1 cup milk to 1 tablespoon of vinegar.


4

It appears that the product closest to American cultured buttermilk is Dickmilch. As noted here, This fermented dairy product known as cultured buttermilk is produced from cow's milk and has a characteristically sour taste caused by lactic acid bacteria. This variant is made using one of two species of bacteria—either Streptococcus lactis or ...


4

Yogurt and milk are not buttermilk. Buttermilk is actually the liquid you have left over after you've made butter. Generally, in baking, it's used for its acidity and protein content. If you want a viable substitute, milk and yogurt can work, or milk and some lemon juice. It's a good idea to let these mixtures sit a bit after you've combined them, to allow ...


3

The report: I decided to forego shopping and use the sauermilch I had. Texture was just as I imagined it. The taste was a bit strong on the baking soda, even on the last pancakes, despite sauermilch being sour enough (pH 4.2). Maybe it was a conversion problem, I measured by weight and didn't have a source for sauermilch density. However, I would advice ...


3

As long as it's mostly liquid, you're probably ok...Buttermilk tends to turn pretty solid when it goes bad. Still, I'd be scared of using it more than 7-10 days after expiration. A good trick is to freeze it in the quantities that you typically use, and thaw as needed.


3

From what I understand soda bread needs an acid to activate the bicarbonate of soda (otherwise the bread won't rise as easily). It is possible to make soda bread without buttermilk but the flavour will be slightly different and the recipe may just not work as well. You're absolutely right about adding some lemon juice to milk though as a replacement, ...


3

This is normal. The batter is not bad and is a chemical reaction. Just stir it up. I have been eating pancakes for years and always refrigerate the extra batter. Its good for a couple of days.


2

Was it just a layer of green on top or was the mixture itself a green colour? The former would suggest it went mouldy; the latter that some chemical reaction occurred to alter the colour. You can also give it a good sniff... if the smell is at all unpleasant or noticeably different, this can be a sign that something went off. Even if it didn't go "bad", ...


2

I've always made mine with Crystal hot sauce, which is sweeter and hotter than Franks. You'll have to experiment with proportions to get the result you want, based on the sauce, but generally you can do 2:1 hotsauce and butter. Buttermilk will certainly give you some tang, but I've personally never tried it in a Buffalo sauce. I start my sauce with minced ...


2

Yes, the fat in the buttermilk should result in a slightly softer, less brittle, batter. The exact crispiness will depend on frying temperature and duration of course.


2

Cakes are chemically leavened with baking powder or baking soda. They have a narrow pH range in which they work. Pineapple juice is very acidic. It probably reacted with your leavening and deactivated it. You can use buttermilk powder for the cake, but you have to mix it with water, not fruit juice. Then it will work as usual.


1

Yes, you can freeze buttermilk. When thawed, the emulsion will break into solids and whey. This makes no difference for baked goods; you can also use a blender to restore it to a smooth, thicker liquid if needed for applications like salad dressing. See also: Video from America's Test Kitchen. The Kitchn


1

The need to mix buttermilk with butter comes from needing a substitute for sour cream in baking since some people cannot use milk, being lactose intolerant. See "The Milk Sugar Dilemma: Living with Lactose Intolerance", substitutions, page 120, Second Edition, Revised and Expanded by Richard A. Martens, M.D. and Sherlyn Martens, M.S., R.D.


1

for american recipes, one can actually replace yogurt for buttermilk 1:1, no other additions or subtractions. I use this commonly for my grandmother's scone recipe (yogurt lives longer than buttermilk in my fridge). I still don't know what sauermilch is... but I'm sure it could be used similarly.


1

Buttermilk never expires. Ten days after the expiration date, just boil it for a few minutes and let it settle for a while. It makes a great dry yogurt in the form of cookies. They last for years.



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