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11

Making a roux has two purposes: Coat the flour granules with fat so they are able to dissolve into the cooking liquid without binding up. Cook the flour to remove the raw cereal flavor. When the cooked, fat-covered, flour is introduced to boiling liquid the starch granules swell and explode tangling up the cooking liquid. The cooking liquid is thus ...


8

I think the problem is that in the original recipe you would have browned the veggies in the roux, which develops flavor. Since you didn't do that, you might want to saute some onions and garlic until well browned and add that in. Other possibilities: (1) Sauce may just need to reduce and become more concentrated (2) May need more salt (3) May need a little ...


5

The previously accepted answer contains a good link, but not any information here on Seasoned Advice, so I thought I would write out a few things from my understanding after having developed an abiding interest in Cajun foods over the past decade. Basically, Creole is a much broader term with a longer history. While it is perhaps inaccurate to say Cajun is ...


2

Having myself originally written most of the Wikipedia article on Tasso (which isn't really that extensive anyways), I feel justified paraphrasing it here: Tasso ham is a specialty of Cajun cuisine. It is not a true ham, since it is made from the front shoulder, rather than the rear leg, of a pig. The front shoulder is a fatty and well-exercised (thus very ...


2

Here's a detailed description of the differences: http://www.tabasco.com/taste_tent/menu_planning/cajun_vs_creole_cooking.cfm


2

You might try doing the roux and chicken stock in a separate pan. Make the roux, and when it starts to turn golden (or dark brown - your choice), pour in a cup of stock and whisk continuously while adding. This will make a gravy like substance, to which you can add the rest of the stock to thin out to the correct consistency. There's really no reason to ...


2

File powder is mostly used for thickening gumbo, and there are two schools of thought on that (armed with shotguns and rifles, so trifle with them at your peril): file gumbo and okra gumbo. A file gumbo is thickened with file (typically added by the diner at before eating the gumbo), as mentioned. An okra gumbo is thickened with... well.. okra. It is ...


1

I cook gumbo all the time. I usually cook large gumbo for parties.. 30 quarts or greater at a time. I can tell you from experience exactly what is happening... And one of the answers above is right on. Your roux is not mixing due to a temperature issue. I ALWAYS use 2 pots when making a gumbo... No matter what kind of gumbo it is. I use a cast iron ...


1

Fresh ... needs to take on the flavor of the sausage


1

I'll attempt to expand upon daniel's answer above. Boudin describes a sausage that is generally created from a blend of beef, rice, and/or pork ("What is Boudin", Cajun French Blog 2009). Sometimes other types of proteins are added to create variations: Gator, Shrimp, crawfish, etc. Boudin is widely known to be used in Cajun cooking. Other various types ...


1

Both Cajun and Creole cuisines originate from French/European influence but there's a specific difference between them - Cajun is French 'provincial' cuisine adapted by local workers for and with local ingredients. Creole is French 'aristocratic' cuisine as practised in the better off households of the south and mimicking the influences of higher quality ...



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