New answers tagged

1

Every substitution is probably going to require other alterations. Baking soda's effects extend beyond leavening: it generally reacts with acidic ingredients (making the batter less sour) and also provides sodium ions which can affect flavor. If the substitute doesn't react with acid as strongly, you may need to decrease acid ingredients or substitute ...


-2

New Health Guide has a specific page dedicated to this question. with not only substitution amounts worked out, but classifications as to when it is best to use one substitute over another. This includes substituting other ingredients for baking soda. So far, they have never steered me wrong.


6

First, you are not telling us the recipe(s), or your typical way of choosing and following them. Due to your reference to fat and calories, I suspect you might be choosing recipes with lower fat/sugar content than average, and possibly reducing fat and sugar in them. If this is the case, there is an important thing to note: your cake still has to be made up ...


0

Add mayonnaise to the batter. Don't laugh, Google it.


1

An alternative to moistening the cake itself could be to serve it with something moist. I usually make a glaze/frosting if the cake itself turned out too dry. Sometimes (not always) the cake will not feel so dry when you eat it. It depends on the cake, serving with sauce or ice cream can also help. Concerning the cause, other answers have good suggestions, ...


-1

The best and easiest way to fix this problem is to put the cake upside down when you get it out of the oven. Let it rest till it's cooled down.


1

I do not have experience with mud cake. If it isn't a very sturdy cake, you may need to add supports (i.e. dowels and cake rounds). If it is sturdy like a yellow or white cake, you can stack them without adding supports. Here is a picture of a cake I made using 9 inch pans for the base and 6 inch pans for the top. There were three layers of cake on each ...


3

A plain sponge or similar can be turned into a lemon drizzle cake (BBC, many other recipes available). Although this adds some sugar, the actual amount is small compared to the rest of the cake. For a really dry cake you might want to make the drizzle a bit runnier (less sugar) anyway. Variations on this are easy. Orange and lime are obvious choices, I've ...


19

No matter what kind of cake you've made, if it turns out too dry, you can moisten it with an appropriately flavored liqueur or syrup. Use a skewer to poke holes every inch and a half or so, then use a pastry brush to paint on the liqueur or syrup getting more into the holes. Coffee syrups come in sugar free varieties if you'd rather not add more calories. ...


1

Make sure the cake has cooled. If the cake is frozen, let is thaw slightly. Trim the uneven cake layer with a long serrated knife so it is even. To slice one cake into two layers, start by tracing a line around the middle of the cake with a long serrated knife. Then slowly rotate the cake while following that line with the knife and cut through the cake ...


2

If you are in the US, a standard box of cake mix makes two round layers. So you will need 2 boxes to make 4 layers. Outside the US, I think the same applies, just read the box. I recommend 3 layers if this is among the first few cakes you have made. Bake the two boxes (4 rounds) then choose the best three of the four rounds out of the oven.


1

One standard box of cake mix (approximately 15-19 oz.) will make two 9" layers. They will be on the thin side. Which ever cake mix you are looking at should tell you what size layers and how many it will make.


6

There are kits available for making your own custom molds from food-grade silicone. The finished molds can be used for various cooking purposes including candy making and baking. The laboratory I work for has used products made by The Smooth-On Company for many years and they are of high quality: ...


0

Depending on your oven, there could be a radiant heat factor that affects baking results when using a glass pan. Because it is made of glass, radiant heat passes through the dish, directly heating the surface of the food. This may be a reason why glass cookware manufacturers recommend preheating an oven before putting in the dish to cook. So, if your oven ...


0

If reducing the sugar, add a 1/2-teaspoon of salt and 1 tablespoon of flour. The flour will help balance the change in the dry-to-wet ingredient ratio, and the added salt will help to bring out the flavors of the butter cake.


0

If speed is the main requirement, you can't get any faster than a Magic Bullet.


11

I always use the hard ones and they contribute to a good end result. I guess with the soft ones it can end up soggy. The hard ones will absorb the liquids and will get a little softer, so the end result won't break down immediately.


4

Many cakes in bakeries are brushed or drizzled with simple syrup once they've cooled. This helps to add moisture to the cake, and the hygroscopic nature of the syrup also helps to prevent staling. It sounds like this would be the perfect solution for you as it would be adding both moisture and a bit more sugar, but without having an effect on the crumb. For ...


5

My suggestion would be to just go with the sugar increase, it might be sufficient to increase moisture. You can combine it with less baking time, if you want to - try using a thermometer and bake to 94 C, maybe 96 if it gets out underbaked. If it still feels dry, you should add fat, not water. Increase the butter, and maybe add one more yolk. You can ...


5

Sifting and whisking are not the same thing. Sifting breaks up lumps in dry powder ingredients, mixed powdered ingredients, and makes the flour less dense. Some people would say sifting makes flour "airier". I measured the volume of flour before and after sifting and I found a significant increase in volume for the same weight of flour post-sifting. Sift ...


4

I run a gluten free bakery and yes, over mixing is a concern for many cake batters, cookie doughs, pie crusts, etc. I find, what makes overmixing an issue is the gums used in the recipes. This being either xanthan or guar. An over-mixed cake batter will become very stringy and goopy, and will not pour smoothly when run off of a spoon, for example. Cookie ...



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