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2

As other answers have said, the result will NOT be (3). The chocolate may melt somewhat during baking, but it will solidify again as it cools. How much it sinks will depend on the thickness of the cake batter -- in some cases it may end up on the bottom, and in other cases it may not sink very much. To achieve your desired result (a "semi-liquid state"), ...


1

Sorry, but it certainly won't be Nr 3. It may be edible, but I don't see why you'll do that instead of making a delicious chocolate cake instead. I have dabbled in high-chocolate recipes, and one of them was for chocolate muffins filled with chopped chocolate (not chocolate chips, but a chopped bar) and glazed with chocolate. The pieces of chocolate were ...


0

Egg smell is more evident in pound cakes where the ratio of eggs used is higher. In layered cakes it is less as fats and eggs are in nearly equal proportion. Besides a combination of two essences where vanilla is common and any other like mixed fruit, almond or other as per requirement can be used. Sugar quantity is increased and milk powder is added, thus ...


2

You didn't have any leavening agent, simple as that. Add about 5-7 g baking powder to this amount of flour and you'll get a normal cake.


0

Whether or not food has mold visually is a different story than if the food should be thrown away anyway for health reasons - just because you can't see anything, doesn't mean it isn't there. 4 days sounds about right - you should throw away leftovers around this timeframe even if mold is not visible unless the food is stored in the freezer. Mold grows ...


5

I don't know what kind of thousand layer cake you had in the restaurant but only ten layers don't sound like it was a Mille-feuille ("a thousand leaves"). A Mille-feuille is a french pastry that consists of three layers of puff pastry, alternating with two layers of pastry cream. That's basically the same thing as your suggestion with phyllo dough. ...


0

Chiffon cake, like it's cousin angel food cake, is mostly air. A big pile of protein bubbles stiffened with a little starch. One very important step is not reflected in your recipe: When the cake is completely baked the proteins have set and the starches have gelatinized but the starches are still very soft. The cake won't have its firm structure until ...


2

You can make the base wider with white chocolate. No glue, and you can do it in advance so you don't need to have any electricity at the site. Put a parchment paper round into an appropriately sized cake pan or a plate or shallow bowl. Stand the cake topper in the middle of the parchment paper. Carefully pour or pipe melted chocolate around the edge of the ...


1

There are lots of other ways to attach a topper to a dowel that don't involve glue. (eg, screws) Here are some other alternatives: fix the topper to a wider base, so that you can just set that on the cake. Something like plasticard (thin, white, can be drilled & screwed from underneath (use stainless steel pan-head screws; might want to wash them ...


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I would suggest a miniature "tree stump" made of sugar; will match the theme and hold well if you stick the topper in the sugar. Something like : http://www.foodmigration.com/2005/11/pulling-sugar-burning-thumbs.html


2

Dust them in flour or powdered sugar. This trick is most commonly used with blueberry muffins.


2

Using wax paper sprinkle it with sprinkles, frost only the edge of the 1st layer, gently pick up the layer (I wear gloves), hold it by the top and bottom and roll it over the sprinkles like a wheel, place it on your cake plate, and now you can frost the top of the 1st layer which will be the middle. Repeat for the 2nd layer, using clean wax paper set-up of ...


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In my experience, unsweetened baking chocolate can replace cocoa + oil at a ratio of 1 oz baking chocolate = 3 T cocoa powder + 1 T oil. I don't think this makes the result more brownie-like, but you do need to reduce the oil (or butter) in the cake to make up for the added oil from the baking chocolate. If you use dark chocolate (or semi-sweet baking ...


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Yes, you certainly can start from a similar recipe and adjust from there. I would not try to replicate instant pudding mix, though. If you don't want to use a store-bought pudding mix, I would suggest you replace that with a different filling entirely. My preference is usually to go with a "scratch" recipe that I already like and adjust from there. For a ...



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