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2

The exact reason depends on the particular ingredient and recipe. Some common ones include: General temperature. By having all of the ingredients at room temperature, the time it takes to bake the overall item(s) is easier to predict, leading to better, more consistent outcomes. Egg whites Egg whites form the protein network that creates the foam when ...


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Use the "cake tier stacker" calculator from https://www.bakingit.com/. This is a great tool for doweling a cake. I use this website all the time when making wedding cakes.


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I've read somewhere that if it's domed slightly, once you take the cake out of the oven, straight away push the dome down ever so gently with a kitchen towel. This will release any air that's built up in the dome. It works if the dome isn't very high.


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No, milk in and of itself does not prevent cakes from rising. There is noting in milk that changes the action of baking powder or baking soda. Just yesterday, for example, I made chocolate muffins with 1/2 cup of milk, chemically leavened, and they rose beautifully. There has to be some other factor involved, but you would need to add much more detail ...


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Yes, you would have a problem whereby thinner parts would cook quicker than thicker ones. You are much better off cooking uniform cakes (sheet cakes are ideal) and cutting them to shape.


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I use merengue powder in my buttercream frosting during the summer. It's good for high humidity. Your frosting doesn't melt as fast and it's light.


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The skin is the outer thick orange-coloured cover; obviously as you're not told to remove it this would include the pith (the white fibrous material) as well. The pips are the seeds inside the fruit: pip noun plural noun: pips 1. a small hard seed in a fruit. synonyms: seed, stone, pit


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Mixed spice is a blend you find in the UK. It's a mix of cinnamon, ground coriander, nutmeg, ginger, and cloves. Some recipes call for mace, caraway, and/or allspice as well. It's a bit like garam masala, there's no set blend. It's as simple as mixing together equal quantities of each, although you may want to add double the mace if you opt for it.


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I addendum to what Jennifer S. has submitted: You can trim the cake to level out any large deformations but filling it in with buttercream is probably a better bet. Make sure to brush away any crumbs so they don't get trapped in your final layer of frosting. The crumb coat technique is very helpful especially if you chill it before applying the final ...


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There are a few things to look at here: shape of cake before you start icing What kind of icing to use, and the kind of effect that it has visually Specific techniques to use with the cake and the icing It looks like your original question has more to do with the cake itself before icing. Good quality cake pans are the key to getting a cake that is a ...


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One tablespoon of apple brandy in a recipe of that volume is an accent; it may be nice to have, but it is not going to dramatically transform the outcome. The obvious choice is to simply omit it. Otherwise, some reasonable substitutions include: Vodka. While it doesn't bring a specific flavor, it will provide alcohol to help dissolve those flavor ...


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As commented by SAJ14SAJ, you can dust the apple pieces with some of the cake mix. There is no need to change the proportions asked for by the cake mix box. You also do not need to cook the apples ahead, but you can slice them quite thinly or cut in small pieces to ensure that they are cooked enough.



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