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i only have one recipe that calls for breadcrumbs, which is my hungarian torte (uses almond meal) and I use fine purchased breadcrumbs. I've never really noticed them but the cake does come out nicely. There's no issue from a flavour perspective as they're often used in sweet foods (like strudel) to absorb the moisture in the fillings. I would use flour ...


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Using breadcrumbs is not that unusual in the US, I found out especially in the Southern States. First issue to address is the breadcrumbs that we see on the chocolate cake. This is most likely due to the fact that the breadcrumbs were not processed fine enough. An example would be dried bread processed finely in a food processor or fine breadcrumbs ...


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Yes, it will make it darker and more brown than white. It may also affect any colours you add, adding a slight brown tinge to them.


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I hope you're using cake release! And you've never actually "seasoned" it (as in covering it with oil and baking it in a very hot oven). If you did season it, that's a problem. I'll get to that in just a second. Otherwise, all you need is to wash the pan right away in hot soapy water (use a high quality dish soap, ultra cheap ones don't work as well) after ...


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You definitely want to use cocoa powder if you can...but... I've done it in a pinch. It's not as good as cocoa powder though because hot chocolate mix is usually also sugar & sometimes powdered milk. But it's still something to fix a chocolate craving when you don't have much else in the cupboard. I've added hot chocolate mix to waffle mix/pancake mix ...


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If you're making the same thickness of cake, and it's a relatively thin cake (suggested by the fact that you're using a sheet pan), you typically do not need to change the time and temperature. So if you've doubled the recipe and doubled the area of the pan, you don't need to make any changes. A larger area cake will rise more as there won't be as much ...


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Here's a highly rated recipe for a Red Velvet Cake in a sheet pan by Lee Drummond. If you're in fact using a sheet pan, compare the quantities of your ingredients to hers. I wouldn't go any bigger in a sheet pan, or it will overflow. I know from experience, that makes a big mess. She uses: 2 1/2 cups cake flour 1teaspoon salt 1 cup buttermilk 1 teaspoon ...


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Mango, guava, banana, form puree's. Citrus, pineapples, pomegranate, etc form juices with high sugar and acid content. I'm allergic to milk, so using water or a juice and adjusting recipe accordingly is important. The rise is affected by acid content. Using the mango or guava try a banana loaf(bread) style recipe, and tweek it.


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I would imagine the parchment will work just fine. They make slow-cooker liners--plastic, I think, too.


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My experience would suggest that unless the aluminum foil is used to form some kind of shape such as a seal around the food, parchment paper would be superior. Aluminum foil is better for forming shapes. Parchment paper is better for non-stick qualities. Parchment paper has a temperature limit of around 400 degrees F, whereas aluminum foil will tolerate ...


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You'll run into another problem when you take the cake out of the fridge -- condensation. Air will cool when it's near the cake, and the moisture in it will condense on the cake, possibly causing odd dots when you try to blot it dry. (possibly smearing the icing, or the water could cause problems on decorated cakes with any variations in color) You have a ...


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What I've found that works for any cake pan is to clean it immediately after removing the cake. Following my mother's example, as soon as I turn a cake (or layer) out, I wipe out any residue in the pan with a dry paper towel. This gets it out while it is still moist and before it has a chance to harden on the surface of the pan. Once it hardens, it can be ...


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It's an enormous amount of work, but I made a batch a few years ago for a friend's daughter's wedding by mixing the cake and frosting and pressing it into two small cookie-cutters (one round and a slightly smaller fluted one), then pushed them out, stacked them to form a wedding cake shape, added the stick and then dipped them in candy melt and decorated ...


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My sponge cake recipe has the same thing (though I think it has 1/2 dl water). It's basically because the person creating the recipe found that without it the cake batter was too thick and didn't yield a cake that was airy enough. When I left out the water, the cake became more dense and didn't rise quite as much. I find that that water is a nice place to ...


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There are two ways to get the shape. One way is to bake them spherical, the other to crumble the cake and to roll the crumples with icing. To bake them spherical, you need a mold that goes into the oven, or an appliance for the task. Your basic cake recipes are what you want here, nothing fancy. White cake, yellow cake or chocolate cake, there's no ...



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