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1 box chocolate cake mix 1/4 cup canola oil 1 egg, beaten 1/3 cup milk 1 cup chocolate chips (optional) sprinkles for topping (optional) Found on: http://girlmeetslife.com/2012/03/chocolate-cake-batter-brownies/


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So, here's is what I did: I did calculate the volume of the cake pan I wanted to use (37 x 5 cm) and the one the recipe calls for (23 x 4 cm), thanks to @Stephie's answer. From the ratio, I figured how much batter is needed to fill the 37 cm cake pan. As for the baking of the large cake, I did take @Joe's advice, used an old towel and a tin can opened from ...


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You are asking about weight. A cake pretty much weighs the same as the sum of its ingredients (maybe some slightly evaporation from the buttermilk). There are plenty of free cup to gram converters on the internet, just use one of those to get an idea how close you are to your 4 kg goal. An egg weighs about 60 - 80 g, but it depends on the size.


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It is a question of scaling. In chat you told us the given recipe was for a 23 cm pan. I'll ignore height for now, assuming the same height for all pan sizes, because that can be adjusted in a second step. The math: The cake batter for round cakes fills a cylinder. The volume of which is base circle area x height, ignore height as stated above. The ...


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An experienced cake baker friend of mine suggests one egg per five guests when making sponge wedding cakes like chocolate or vanilla (not traditional Buritsh fruit cakes, which is the norm where I come from) I'm in the same boat, of cooking my first wedding cake for 150 guests, and I'll be making a 30-egg cake on that basis.


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A common practise in some French islands is to macerate fruits, spices and sugar in rum for some time, and then to filter them, in order to make a flavoured, strong, very tasty drink called "Rhum arrangé". This process might be too long for you, but you could consider it for making a Calvados substitute to use in a few months (usually 2 or 3 at least for ...


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I was able to find a 50ml bottle at Bevmo for $6.99. That will give you 6 portions. Very affordable. I have also seen Calvados at one Trader Joes (in northern CA), but not all stores carry it. I think it was around $20 for a tall bottle probably 375 ml. Hope you get this. Good luck!


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The problem was a malfunctioning freezer; this is why ice cream melted overnight in it.


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Since you say that you know they're edible, I'd say that the tooth and crown are most likely made of gum paste, not fondant. The curves on the points of the crown would likely droop really badly if made of fondant because it never solidifies. Gum paste does. So, once you have it molded to the shape you want, you let it dry out and then it stiffens to a ...


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There can also be nutritional/dietary considerations involved in choosing one or the other (saturated vs unsaturated fats, dairy or nondairy ingredients). Also, oil is easier to accurately measure by volume than solid fats like butter.


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If in doubt, a cake, unless it has a very sticky filling (fruit+sugar, chocolate...), can almost always be tested by pushing a toothpick/skewer right through the center (while in opened oven - oven gloves advised if inexperienced :), and checking whether the stick comes out clean - if not, give it extra baking time. If the exposed surface would brown too ...


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This almost sounds like a base for enriched bread - you got eggs, milk, sugar and some flavoring :) Just add fat and flour and leavening ....


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I'm going to ignore the actual icing ingredients for a moment here as I suspect they will be mostly icing sugar and a few neglible other things. So you now have roughly 1 cup / 250 ml milk 1.5 eggs 6 tblsp / 60g starch and flour a lot of icing sugar -> The egg means you need a heating step to get that mixture safe. If we ignore the sugar, we are ...


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Every substitution is probably going to require other alterations. Baking soda's effects extend beyond leavening: it generally reacts with acidic ingredients (making the batter less sour) and also provides sodium ions which can affect flavor. If the substitute doesn't react with acid as strongly, you may need to decrease acid ingredients or substitute ...


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To replace baking soda, you can use four times the soda's measurement of baking powder. There are other alternatives, such as Natron if you live in Europe or have access to a European marketplace, but they tend to get complicated as acidic ingredients become involved. New Health Guide has a specific page here dedicated to this question. with not only ...


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First, you are not telling us the recipe(s), or your typical way of choosing and following them. Due to your reference to fat and calories, I suspect you might be choosing recipes with lower fat/sugar content than average, and possibly reducing fat and sugar in them. If this is the case, there is an important thing to note: your cake still has to be made up ...


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Add mayonnaise to the batter. Don't laugh, Google it.


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An alternative to moistening the cake itself could be to serve it with something moist. I usually make a glaze/frosting if the cake itself turned out too dry. Sometimes (not always) the cake will not feel so dry when you eat it. It depends on the cake, serving with sauce or ice cream can also help. Concerning the cause, other answers have good suggestions, ...


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The best and easiest way to fix this problem is to put the cake upside down when you get it out of the oven. Let it rest till it's cooled down.


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I do not have experience with mud cake. If it isn't a very sturdy cake, you may need to add supports (i.e. dowels and cake rounds). If it is sturdy like a yellow or white cake, you can stack them without adding supports. Here is a picture of a cake I made using 9 inch pans for the base and 6 inch pans for the top. There were three layers of cake on each ...


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A plain sponge or similar can be turned into a lemon drizzle cake (BBC, many other recipes available). Although this adds some sugar, the actual amount is small compared to the rest of the cake. For a really dry cake you might want to make the drizzle a bit runnier (less sugar) anyway. Variations on this are easy. Orange and lime are obvious choices, I've ...


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No matter what kind of cake you've made, if it turns out too dry, you can moisten it with an appropriately flavored liqueur or syrup. Use a skewer to poke holes every inch and a half or so, then use a pastry brush to paint on the liqueur or syrup getting more into the holes. Coffee syrups come in sugar free varieties if you'd rather not add more calories. ...


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Make sure the cake has cooled. If the cake is frozen, let is thaw slightly. Trim the uneven cake layer with a long serrated knife so it is even. To slice one cake into two layers, start by tracing a line around the middle of the cake with a long serrated knife. Then slowly rotate the cake while following that line with the knife and cut through the cake ...



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