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22

Here is my camping strategy. If I'm going for more than a few days, here's what I do. Start with a good air tight cooler. (Big enough to hold everything perishable). Forget those "gel packs". Definitely don't get a bag of ice from the convenience store. They melt and mess stuff up. Get a 2 litre bottle, rinse it out, fill it with water and freeze it. (Do ...


15

Since you specified not wanting any equipment other than a campfire and a stick, the best I can do is add one more piece of equipment you should be able to find anywhere (i.e., not have to carry with you): a rock. If you put a flat-topped rock just to the edge of your campfire, you should be able to place a graham cracker and slab of chocolate on top of it. ...


14

The key is mostly to cook over coals rather than open flame if you want decent control. This is a principle you find all over slow smoking/BBQ. You start the fire with plenty of wood and let it burn down to a pile of red coals, which you then can cook over with nice control. Personally, when I want to cook over an open fire, I treat the fire pit as 2 zones: ...


11

Cooked tofu will keep almost as well as raw tofu, and it will be lighter, as the water will be gone. Depending on how long you're planning to camp, you can just fry it all at home, then reheat small amounts of it for dinner.


11

I was recently on a canoe trip. We ran out of chocolate for the s'mores a couple nights before the end, so we substituted Nutella. No need to worry about melting, just spread it on the graham cracker. The resulting s'mores are much messier, though, since it all tends to squeeze out between the crackers. Overall, we judged it enough of a success that ...


8

A friend of mine taught me a great camping recipe that's healthy, extremely easy to prepare, and can satisfy the very hungry. Put the following into an aluminum foil pouch (don't even need the cast iron!): Ground beef (or turkey, if you want to go leaner) Chopped up vegetables: Potatoes Carrots Onions If you want to get creative, throw in some leeks, ...


8

I'd look towards a dutch oven and cake-like items: upside-down cakes cobblers / crisps / grunts / bettys / slumps / etc. In all of these, the fruit on the bottom helps to protect from the bottom of the cake-like-item cooking too quickly. You can either cook directly in the dutch oven, or drop another pan inside the dutch oven to speed on cleaning if ...


8

If you get an enameled cast iron pot too hot, you can soften the enamel enough to damage it. My brother ruined one when we were younger on an electric stove, set on high (was making ramen, forgot about it, turned off the stove after the water had boiled off, when it cooled it fused to the burner) The thing about camp fires is that they burn at different ...


8

Many camping cookbooks recommend picking up some coals from the fire and putting them on the lid of the dutch oven while it is on a grate above the fire. This gives a more "all around" heat rather than just trying to cook the whole loaf of bread from the bottom. This image search gives lots of examples. Personally, I don't try to bake a whole loaf of bread ...


6

If you're near a creek or a lake, usually just sticking your drinks in the water gets them well below the ambient air temp.


6

I normally make cookies using 1 cup almond butter, 1 egg, 1 c. sugar, perhaps you can substitute some of the sugar for protein powder and see how it goes? Now I'm somewhat interested in trying that myself! According to nutrional data it looks like protein powder and egg whites have the most amount of protein in them, the list Foods highest in Protein may ...


6

Campfire Advantages: Less equipment to bring, you can do everything from grilling to roasting to steaming to baking, makes you feel more awesome for having cooked over a fire. Disadvantages: Longer to set up, can darken pots, harder to control and regulate heat, more prone to burning food/hands. My Usage: BBQing/Grilling (Steaks, burgers), roasting ...


5

You have two delicious choices. Both require a bed of coals, so I'll start with that. You'll need to build a fire with the logs stacked 'log cabin' style, and let the fire burn down to coals. You want a deep red coal, just starting to darken on top. The coals should look something like this. You can bake, or bbq the chicken and asparagus. Both are ...


5

I can't top the foil pack for a meal, but if you're looking for a good dessert, try this: core out an apple, fill it with butter, sugar, and cinnamon, put the top of the apple back on it, wrap it in foil, and toss it in the fire. In about 10 minutes (give or take, depending on the temp of your fire), you will have a delicious baked apple. If you want to ...


5

Do you have one of those wire racks that hold food in tight but give access to both sides through a grid? I think folks use them for fish sometimes. Anyhow, brush your tofu with oil, put it in one of those racks, and then give it direct heat over the stove or campfire. Same idea, but just use tongs and do one slab at a time. It will brown and heat through ...


5

There are a couple of tricks you can try. The recipe (ingredients) will make a difference, of course, but: Use a really heavy pan, possibly line it with (greased) baking paper Dutch oven workaround Heavy large pan using a little (disposable if you want) metal rack/tray to lift the cake away from the walls. Use a drop of water if you must. You could also ...


5

Oatmeal. Before you leave, mix the oats with whatever you like: brown sugar, spices, a little salt, nuts, dried fruit, even powdered milk. Boil water and mix it in your bowl so that's all you have to wash; you can boil extra water and get tea or coffee at the same time. (Other fast-cooking hot cereals would work too - I know of instant grits and instant ...


5

Assuming you have access to a food dehydrator or an oven that can be trusted at a low setting, you would be better off pre-cooking and then drying the cooked beans. When you get to camp, just add boiling water and wait 15 minutes, and they'll be done. This would save you the fuel cost of the long cook-time that most beans require, and allow you to season ...


5

Bisquick is a dry product that contains partially hydrogenated soybean and/or cottonseed oil and leavening. You can get recipe ideas from their website. With the Bisquick, some powdered eggs and powdered milk, you could create all kinds of fun mixes for camping.


4

Personal experience: I have used pots and pans on this and similar grills with no problems. My guess would be, if it says not to use them, it's probably as you said - for the non-stick coating. There is a specific grill grate you can buy for the larger models, and perhaps you're not going to get the most efficient heat transfer by putting it directly on ...


4

Not sure how much equipment you're hauling, but my advice is to employ aluminum-foil generously. Once you get a nice sear on your meat or kebobs, cooking over direct flame will only dry-out the meat. Wrapping food in foil helps evenly distribute heat, and it keeps moisture and juices inside the pouch. I particularly like sausage , onions and peppers done ...


4

There are so many variables here, I can't address them all. Whether are not you are hiking or driving to the camping spot, whether you can bring frozen/refrigerated ingredients in a cooler, whether you have permission to modify the camp fire area, etc. If you are hiking a fair distance, you will need to stick to safe-at-room-temperature ingredients, use ...


4

The most important thing is to cook over open coals not over open flame. You'll get more even heat and no sooty smoke. Just build up a fire with some good-size pieces of wood and let it burn down so the flames are gone and you're left with a nice set of red-hot coals. Then start cooking. At this point, theoretically, it's just like cooking over charcoal ...


4

For camping trips where a dutch oven isn't a possibility, you can make a crepe-cake: make a stack of crepes, spreading your favorite filling (mmm, Nutella) between each layer. You can go as high as you'd like (or as your supply of ingredients will allow). Frost the outside with whipped cream, stick some candles on top, and go ahead, try to convince me that ...


4

Take a second pot so that you can cook potatoes, rice, or pasta. Typically you can make a pieces-of-meat in sauce in the dutch oven, then take it off the fire and put a towel on it to keep it warm for half an hour while you cook the carbs. This gives everyone more control of the carbs-to-sauce ratio (different kids will have different preferences) while ...


4

What about simply baking meringues? They're basically dried egg white with mostly consists of protein (Egg white nutrition data). You can simply take with a few as long as you can manage to keep them dry.


4

Ice chests last way longer than just a few hours. Unless the weather is insanely hot, if you put a reasonable amount of ice in a good ice chest, and don't open it all the time, there'll still be ice in it a couple days later.


4

There are two tricks that I know of: Stuff the chocolate in the middle of the marshmallow. More time in the fire will help it get melty. Roast your marshmallow long and slow so it's hot all the way through. It should practically fall off the stick. The hotter the marshmallow is, the more heat it can transfer to your chocolate. Let the whole s'more sit ...


4

Your fire was probably too hot at the bottom, and too cold at the top of the dutch oven. Was it flames or coals and ashes? Only the latter will do correctly. You can heat the dutch oven (including the lid) before you put the bread inside, to make the temperature more regular. Turning it 1/4 of a circle every 1/4 of the time also helps having a more ...


4

The interior of modern cans are a heat resistant plastic (remember they pressure cook the cans at the factory), and will be fine for heating liquid things Just don't try using it to fry stuff!



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