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26

Here is why it's stupid: Sous-vide doesn't get hot enough to kill botulism spores. Low acid foods will be very dangerous. Boiling is required for a strong seal on canning jars. All pectin jellies I have seen require boiling to set. High acid recipes often call for processing in a water bath for a mere 10 minutes to seal the lids. Recipes that don't call ...


17

Sure you can use the jars over and over, but the lids should never be reused. That rubber seal is damaged the first time you use it. They are designed to soften during the canning process in order to form an air-tight seal. They may not form that seal upon reuse. You should always use new lids when canning.


16

If you are seeing this effect after the jars have been in storage for a long period, do not eat the contents! This is a sign of botulism due to improper canning; the bacteria often (but not always) produce gas as they grow spores. If this is happening immediately after the canning process, it is probably because you are not creating a proper vacuum seal. ...


16

These various boilings serve different purposes. The jam mixture is boiled to reduce the liquid and bring the pectin to its gelling temperature. The bottles and lids are boiled to sterilize them as you said. The final water bath kills any bugs that were introduced while filling the jars. Additionally this boiling ensures a good seal on the bottles. In the ...


13

When tomatoes are cooked (which I assume you plan on doing for canning or after freezing) the skins become tough and usually detach from the tomato. Since you usually don't mind this, you shouldn't mind it with canned tomatoes either, but many people do - even when pureed the texture is different. When freezing you can freeze whole and the skin should come ...


13

Absolutely not. You need to boil them if you're even THINKING about canning. Chances are you'd be fine, nice acidic relish to keep the bacteria down...But do you want to take the chance? Even if you have one of those dishwashers with a nuclear "sterilize baby bottles" cycle, don't trust it. For canning, you need them as close to medically sterile as is ...


13

Assuming the can was canned properly and has not been damaged, the contents are effectively sterile, because the food is boiled in the can after it's sealed. There might be some degradation in texture and taste, but in terms of food safety, they are effectively safe. Note that the date on your tin is given as Best Before, not Use By. That generally means ...


12

Obviously, every manufacturer is going to have their own proprietary methods. However, canned goods are often made by combining ingredients (possibly partially cooked) directly into the cans, and then pressure cooking them in the can as part of the canning process. So, for example, the broth, some celery, and some carrots might be added to the open can in ...


11

If the jars are properly sealed the vacuum in the jar and the waxed edge will hold the lid safely sealed. Undisturbed those jars will remain sealed until they are opened. The ring will reduce the risk of "unintentional" opening and that is really all the ring does. There are two real advantages to removing the ring once the seal is set. If something ...


9

Before filling the jars, you should do the following: Place the jars (right-side-up) on a rack inside a boiling-water canner Fill the canner and jars with water to one inch above the jars Boil for 10 min (or more for higher elevations) Remove and drain the jars, one at a time I toss the lids and rings in there as well, since the lids seal best ...


9

Washing them in hot water is most certainly not enough. Sterilization via boiling under pressure is guaranteed to kill every harmful pathogen, particularly Clostridium botulinum, the beastie responsible for botulism. The "hot" water from your tap is not enough to kill the spores. C botulinum spores must be heated to 250 F for at least three minutes to ...


9

That passage is suggesting an entire canning/processing method, one that may not be safe. It will generally work to create a seal, as they say, but it may not fully sterilize the contents and the seal will not be as likely to hold. I would not follow their instructions, and instead process your chutney according to a trusted canning recipe you find ...


9

Those are the flavorings. Just like dill pickles have dill in them, those are what give the flavor profile that people expect from bread & butter pickles.


8

You cannot preserve just any salsa recipe (unless you're just freezing it). Tomatoes are on the border between acidic and non-acidic foods. What this means is that they can be water-bath canned if they are sufficiently high in acid; but, if they are low in acid, they need to be pressure canned. If you want to be sure to avoid trouble, follow a tested ...


8

My opinion- I haven't done rigorous testing: Canning softens the interior of the peach but when I have (in my laziness) left the skins on they stay tough and quite unpleasant tasting. I doubt it has any effect on the longevity of the product but it would make it a little less pleasant and versatile.


8

"Pickling salt" is sold, the main difference being the absence of iodine and anti-caking agents. The anti-caking agents can cloud the pickling liquid, but shouldn't effect the flavor. Iodine can impart a bit of a bitter aftertaste, and some sources say can "react adversely with some foods". I've never noticed a difference between the taste of table salt and ...


7

Without a canner you are limited to canning high-acid foods. Botulism spores don't die at 212F, the boiling point of water. A pressure canner boiling water at 15PSI raises the boiling point to 250F or so which will kill the spores. The bacterium cannot grow in a high acid environment and so high-acid foods such as fruit and pickles do not need to be ...


7

Preheat the jars with hot tap water, and then just dump them in the boiling water (with tongs or other appropriate utensil, of course).


7

Yup, its perfectly fine. The seal protects the food, not the ring. At worst it makes them a little more susceptible to bumps that could break the seal (but it'd have to be a significant 'bump'). If the seal were to break and the ring were in place, the food still wouldn't be properly protected.


7

Tomatoes aren't high acid, so they need the addition of vinegar or lemon juice in order to safely can with a hot water bath. Honestly, I'm not sure why you would want to make tomato sauce from canned tomatoes because for me, the whole point of canning tomatoes is because the tomatoes will otherwise go bad. But anyhow... I recommend finding a tomato sauce ...


7

If your jam has at least 1:1 ratio (1 kg of sugar per kg of fruit) or more, you do not have to can it. Then it is so overwhelmingly sweet that bacteria cannot live in it. If the jam has less sugar (1:2 are popular, 1:3 are found sometimes), then you have to either can it, or keep it in the fridge and consume it within a few days, similar to any other ...


6

Pickling salt is very fine-grained, so that it will dissolve easily. It is important to have an even salt solution when pickling. You can use a more coarse salt; just take care it's dissolved completely. Iodized salt can also turn the pickled items a darker color.


6

As with all can goods, as long as the can has no physical defects (meaning swollen or dented, ectera), the contents should still be good. The date on the outside is mainly a best by date, after which a company will no longer vouch for the contents contained therein.


6

I've never seen canned pesto, nor do I know if there is a way to do it safely. I will propose an alternate solution. Have you thought about freezing it? I've had pesto given to me as a gift before, but it was made as normal then frozen in a canning jar. It worked great. Did some more digging and eventually came across this, from the National Center for Home ...


6

The key issue is getting the contents of each jar up to the requisite temperature for the necessary time, all the way through to the center of the jars. It would be conceivably possible to use steaming to do so, if the requisite controlled temperatures and times could be regulated, and appropriate recipes developed. However, according to the USDA as ...


6

Yes. Any part of the bottle that is not submersed may not reach the proper temperature for sterilization.


5

Costs to consider when making jam: One-Time Costs Pressure canner Water-bath canner Large pot for making jam in Strainer (can use a colander-type item or something like a Squeez-o) Jar rack that goes inside the canner Jar lifter Funnel Jars Freezer-safe containers Jar rings Recurring Costs Jar lids Fruit (you can often get pretty ...


5

The Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving includes a section that does just what you're asking. It also provides a large collection of excellent recipes and general tips and tricks.


5

Were your blueberries grainy? I occasionally get a pint that have a grainy texture. I've heard that this means they aren't quite fresh, but they usually taste just fine despite the texture. I'm not sure if this particular graininess translates to a jam though. Jam can also get grainy from sugar that isn't fully dissolved. This can happen more easily with ...


5

Low heat pasteurisation is common in the food processing industry. They also use many other techniques including batch laboratory testing. Two low temperature techniques are: Narrow tube pasteurisation. To ensure all food/liquid has been evenly heated and then cooled. Only suitable for food/liquid that can pass through a grid of narrow tubes. Can be as low ...



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