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9

I would say there are 2 problems here: the lack of water, and the constant stirring. Try adding 1/4 cup of water to the sugar - this should stop it catching and burning. You should avoid stirring caramelising sugar because you run the risk of flicking bits of it onto the side of the pan. These isolated bits cook faster and thus burn, then drop into the ...


6

Quite simply, it's the fat content. Whole milk or "full-fat" milk is 3.25% fat by weight. Heavy cream is 36-40% fat by weight. These two products are at opposite ends of the fat spectrum, and there's very little difference between 1% and 3% when it comes to an item such as caramel sauce, for which the optimal ratio is about 50% fat. (A little butter can ...


5

It is odd that the original recipe didn't include a temperature, as temperature is absolutely critical in candymaking. That is probably why your results were so inconsistent, as different pans would have heated the mixture at different rates. I would shoot for a temperature of 240-250F (Hard ball stage) as that should be thick enough to coat the nuts and ...


5

To get the sugar caramelized to that perfect dark brown, I start the sugar on the stove top and finish in the oven. I start by adding a bit of water and some corn syrup (the fructose makes the brown more intense, but one can skip it) to the sugar and keep it on a medium burner until it reaches the first caramel stage, at 155°C/311°F. As Michael ...


5

There's a bit of misinformation in the answers and comments here I'd like to clear up. Tobiasopdenbrouw's suggestion in his comment that a thinner pan may work better is a good one. A thin aluminum pan is an excellent conductor of heat which is precisely why it would help in a situation like this. It is far more responsive to taking the pan on and off the ...


4

Microwave candy recipes are very fast and easy. They tend to be only a little different in flavor than the stove top versions in my experience. There seems to be a little less depth of flavor. The recipes usually call for short periods of microwaving and frequent stirring. As far as the cooking times- I have to follow the recipe as I have no way of ...


4

As you mentioned it is all about how the crystals form. Some of the factors off the top of my head: How saturated is the solution - The more sugar packed into the syrup the more easily it will crystallize. How quickly it cools - The slower the bigger the crystals Interference - Do you have a starch or other sugar molecules gumming up the works? ...


4

The higher the temperature, the harder the caramel. That is basically the whole story. So I think what is happening to you is that the caramel in the middle is still going up in temperature due to residual heat, while the stuff at the sides cools down quickly because it can vent heat through the pan to the outside world. Have you checked the calibration on ...


4

It's not the sugar that caused the milk to curdle, it's the milk itself. Dulce de leche and caramel are both usually made with either cream, condensed, or evaporated milk. The issue with regular milk (especially skim), is that it has such a high water content and low fat content. The fat in cream buffers the protein, helping to prevent curdling, and the ...


4

It is perfectly normal for sugar to turn dark brown when making caramel. If it turns even darker, it is because it has been burning too hot. The final temperature should be around 234 F, so you want to get there gradually. As for the color, many recipes call for cream to make it smoother and tender, but only incorporate it after the crystals are fully ...


3

You don't tell us neither the ratio of double cream to caramel, nor the time you heat the completed mix, so this is just a guess. But it sounds logical that your problem is evaporation. Double cream consists mainly of fat and water. I don't remember the exact percentages, but more than half of it is water. So, if you heat cream, part of it evaporates ...


3

Your best bet is to use rum extract, especially one designed for candy making, and to add it only after the sugar (or honey) syrup comes to temperature. The extract is going to have a much stronger flavor than actual rum. You will not need to dilute your syrup base to get a good flavor. Adding it at the end minimizes the amount of volatile flavor lost to ...


3

Oddly I have a coworker who bought a caramel apple and then left it in its plastic on his desk for about 4 years. We didn't photo document its decline but I should be able to recall. After about a week the impalement point became quite unappealing. The area around the stick darkened and softened (it seemed, I didn't touch it). The rest of the skin looked ...


3

You want to get your flavor from the rind, not the juice. It's full of flavorful oils. The best way to do this in your case is probably to make your own orange zest by using a fine grater (I love my Microplane for this) and adding the zest to your sauce while cooking. Be sure to only use the outermost layer of the rind; the white part is the pith, and is ...


3

I wish I had time for a more complete answer, but it sounds like you are trying to make fudge. It's quite an involved process. To give a very brief outline of the process without explaining why it works, you need to, Bring your candy mixture to a boil and then stop stirring. Use a sugar thermometer and wait for the temperature to reach 115C (softball ...


3

Ok, as my first answer started without really reading the question , I will give it another go. As you want to minimize the temperature fluctuations, you will want to use a heavy saucepan. As the entire thing is experimental, you will want to minimize the variables. Do all your testing and development with a fixed quantity of sugar that you do not want to ...


2

I personally wouldn't try it. Caramelizing is a delicate process and it is very easy to burn the sugar. It also gets up to a very high temperature (typical table sugar is 160° C / 320° F) and several dishes that might be labeled "microwave-safe" will not withstand that temperature. You would actually need an oven-safe vessel for this process. Last but ...


2

I can't back this up with any evidence, but I think the reason it doesn't work well is that at the temperature required to caramelize sugar, the other "impurities" in brown sugar will be burned and gross. You might be able to get a similar effect by making regular white-sugar caramel and then mixing in molasses after it has begun to cool.


2

I just made caramel sauce for the first time with very simple ingredients: water, sugar, cream and vanilla this recipe. The recipe asked for heavy whipping cream and I used half and half instead because it was all I had. My sauce turned out very very thin, but still rich with flavor. It has been in the fridge for a day and still flows like liquid.


2

If you make caramel acidic, it won't harden. So use cream of tartar (neutral taste) or lemon juice (easier availability) to create a non-hardening sticky caramel fluid. I am not sure if you can add dairy (milk, cream, butter, etc). to acidified caramel, but there is a small chance that it will curdle, so I'd advice you to use clear caramel (browned sugar ...


2

Combine 10oz frozen raspberries, 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 tsp cornstarch, and 1/2 cup water. Bring to boil, and continue boiling 5 minutes, or until sauce is thick. Strain sauce through a mesh strainer to remove seeds. Then you have hot raspberry puree (which is sweet) -- otherwise, remove the sugar. Source: I made it once using this recipe.


2

In US recipes "individually wrapped caramels" will always mean the soft variety. If the writer of the recipe wants you to use hard, the recipe will say "hard". Recipes that ask for "individually wrapped caramels" are looking for this: caramels


2

Once you see the bubbling, it means the water has reached close to 100 C (assuming you're close to sea level) and once that water mostly evaporates the temperature will shoot up fast. Turn the heat lower when you see the bubbles and sail smooth from there. According to some recipes, stirring can cause crystallization. Once you've reached the desired color, ...


2

The viscosity of the caramel could also vary with the type of apples used. Apples with high water content will dilute the caramel more when your pie cooks. Unfortunately I have no facts regarding water contents of different varieties of apple. Yet another variable is the age of the apples. Newly picked apples will contain more water than if they have been ...


1

I successfully used a mix of half butter and half sour cream (a store brand with an ingredient list a mile long.) I put the butter in first and stirred well but added the sour cream while a little butter remained. I made a salted caramel sauce and can't taste anything off; it's actually very good.


1

As others have said, temperature is the key to the firmness of caramels, but not to the texture of caramels. You mentioned the inside is grainy. If that's the case, you might be getting incorrectly crystalized sugar in the center of the pan. One of the tricks to making caramels is to never scrape the pan. Let as much of the caramel flow out of the pan as ...



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