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15

Low and slow is the only way to go, I'm afraid. You can add some broth and simmer them down (as opposed to just cooking them in oil) but make sure you add little enough that it will all evaporate...Don't want to be pouring off flavor.


13

Deglazing removes caramelized bits (the "browned" bits) from the bottom of your pan or skillet after cooking meats or vegetables. It is usually accomplished by putting stock, sauce, wine, or even water (or really any liquid) in the pan over heat after the pan has been emptied of whatever was cooked into it and any rendered fat and scraping the browned bits ...


12

To clarify a little, there are several ways you can cook onions. You could be trying to get them to turn translucent. In which case, you can cook over medium heat, stirring frequently. This will take somewhere around 5 minutes. Preheating the pan isn't really required (especially if using a non-stick pan). If they start to brown, turn down the heat. You ...


11

In addition to what everyone else has said, you may want to add some salt as the onions caramelize. The salt will help draw out the sugars, and allow them to caramelize more. Some techniques I've seen also suggest a little sugar to help the caramelizing process... but personally I think that's cheating. That's up to you though.


7

Deglazing is a technique for making sauces and gravies. It occurs after you've accumulated cooked on meats and other deposits. First remove your meat and any excess liquid fat. Second crank the heat up high and get your pan nice and hot. Next add a cool liquid (water/wine/stock). The liquid will boil rapidly and lift the browned deposits to create a ...


7

On the Splenda website it says that Splenda doesn't caramelize like sugar. Admittedly, it is talking about getting the golden brown colour in your baked goods, but I suspect since it doesn't happen in that instance, it wouldn't work in a hard candy.


6

Without seeing the result and knowing your exact technique, my best guess is that you're not using enough liquid, or that you're using heat that's too high. High heat will essentially fry the onions, like you would expect by dropping chicken or potatoes into a pan full of hot oil. Properly caramelized onions should take at least 20 to 30 minutes, I try ...


6

Onions have a lot of sugar in them. All they want in the world is to burn and fill your kitchen with oniony smoke. The solution, as with all things heavy in sugar, is to turn down the heat and stir frequently. That said- if your olive oil was extra virgin then it might have been your oil that started burning before the onions did.


5

It's my understanding that sucralose (what makes Splenda sweet) is REALLY sweet, so much of what's in a measure of Splenda is fillers to bring the volume up so similar amounts of sugar and Splenda sweeten things a similar amount. I very much doubt that the fillers would behave as sugar does in a candy. You can bake with it in situations where sugar isn't ...


5

I've never really considered there to be a real difference between sautéing and frying. They both mean to cook in a hot pan with a little bit of fat. However there isn't a lot of consistency online. It doesn't look like there's any sort of definitive answer here. Some points of view: They're the same, although frying might involve slightly more oil. The ...


5

Caramelization occurs at the melting point of sugar. When a sugar molecule hits the appropriate temperature, it melts. This is similar to ice turning to water above 32 F (0 C). It will take some time for all of a given amount of sugar to melt, but this is relatively insignificant compared to ice melting due primarily to the vast amount of heat involved to ...


5

I think you've answered your own question. Low & slow, with constant stiring. To hot & fast will burn the sugars you are attempting to bring out of the onion. I don't believe there are alternatives to doing this. But maybe someone will correct me.


5

As you mentioned it is all about how the crystals form. Some of the factors off the top of my head: How saturated is the solution - The more sugar packed into the syrup the more easily it will crystallize. How quickly it cools - The slower the bigger the crystals Interference - Do you have a starch or other sugar molecules gumming up the works? ...


5

I've used this palm sugar caramel recipe before without problems. It uses about 25% honey as well as the sugar. 17oz palm sugar 4.25 oz Honey 14 oz heavy cream As soon as the sugars get to 320 ℉ (160 ℃), take the pan off the heat and deglaze it with the cream. If you let it sit on the heat any longer, it will burn. After adding the cream simply cook it ...


5

The technique for creating a proper layer of melted sugar on your creme brulee involves three important elements: After you add the sugar, gently swirl the ramekin to create smooth layer of sugar. You don't want it too clump or be uneven. Gently 'kiss' the sugar with the tip of the flame, moving the flame around to heat evenly, just until the sugar starts ...


4

In a very low effort way you can do it with a crock pot. Put in 2-4oz of butter depening on crock pot size and as many onions as the crock pot will hold. Set it on low. Come back 8 hrs later.


4

I wish I had time for a more complete answer, but it sounds like you are trying to make fudge. It's quite an involved process. To give a very brief outline of the process without explaining why it works, you need to, Bring your candy mixture to a boil and then stop stirring. Use a sugar thermometer and wait for the temperature to reach 115C (softball ...


4

The secret to really crispy skin has everything to do with rendering the fat that lies directly under it. Once that fat has removed itself from the skin, a little high heat will crisp it up perfectly. If I am creating a roast chicken, I normally remove it from the packaging and allow it to sit uncovered in the fridge for at least overnight, longer if I ...


4

I own one, and have tried it for both those uses, but with mediocre results compared to other techniques. For crème brûlée, I get more even caramelization by placing the individual custards under a broiler. The only benefit I could appreciate from using the torch was that it was quicker, and I could monitor the caramelization more easily. (The broiler ...


4

Microwave candy recipes are very fast and easy. They tend to be only a little different in flavor than the stove top versions in my experience. There seems to be a little less depth of flavor. The recipes usually call for short periods of microwaving and frequent stirring. As far as the cooking times- I have to follow the recipe as I have no way of ...


4

Splenda does not work for making hard candies, I learned this the hard way. I tried to make peanut brittle for my grandmother and it turned into a sticky mess... twice. I thought maybe I did something wrong the first time, but after looking it up discovered that splenda (even the boxes branded "for baking") will not be good for candy making.


4

It is perfectly normal for sugar to turn dark brown when making caramel. If it turns even darker, it is because it has been burning too hot. The final temperature should be around 234 F, so you want to get there gradually. As for the color, many recipes call for cream to make it smoother and tender, but only incorporate it after the crystals are fully ...


4

Unlined copper is sometimes used for serious sugar work, but it is very expensive and requires maintenance. For general home use where you want to get more than one use from the pan, a good multi-ply stainless pan is probably the best choice in terms of utility and easy of maintenance. You do not want ceramic coatings which can craze at high temperatures, ...


4

Caramelising is a chemical process in which sugars decompose under the influence of heat (pyrolisis). It happens to any heated sugars, no matter if they are free (as in heating refined sugar for making candy) or bound in something else (such as the sugars naturally occurring in an onion). The outcome of the process are compounds which have a dark color and ...


4

It sounds like you may be having temperature control issues. If it's not dark enough, keep it over low heat for a bit longer. If it's hardening/burning, it's probably caused by one of the following: 1) your stovetop (if burner isn't turned low enough or burner is too large and overheats sides of pan) 2) your pan (easy to burn things if your pan isn't ...


3

I admit, I have a hardware-grade torch, that I also use for plumbing, but it does have some culinary-related uses besides what's been mentioned: Starting the grill. For charcoal, or for those times on the propane grill when the sparker's not working and you don't want to take the time to re-gap it. Planting your garden. You can burn holes in weed-block ...


3

I would say probably not, with a few exceptions. I have one and the only thing I really use it for that you couldn't do some other way is crème brûlée. You can blacken the skin of a pepper with some tongs and a gas burner. Of course, if your stove is electric, then the torch suddenly becomes much more useful. The thing I use mine for a lot is browning meat ...



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