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Carbon steel is more malleable and less brittle than stainless steel. This means that it is easier to hone on a knife steel, to maintain an extremely sharp edge. Some folks feel that the benefit of that sharp edge–for example, in easily slicing tomatoes, and other very fast prep tasks–is worth the compromise of more persnickety maintenance.


7

My guess is carbon steel. It's used in a variety of cooking implements, including stuff like woks and as bread pans. A quick search suggests that carbon steel is often magnetic as you report. If it is indeed carbon steel, it benefits from seasoning and ongoing love and care similar to cast iron (lest it rust or deteriorate). Many articles on this, such as ...


6

Induction cooking works by generating an electric current in the metal cooking vessel and converting that current into heat, which requires a resistive material (i.e. a poor conductor). It's a bit of a catch-22, because you need a good conductor to actually distribute that heat. This is why some of the best induction cookware is clad metal - two layers of ...


4

One important factor in induction cooking is surface contact. This means that the base has to be sturdy. I have a carbon steel skillet similar to your option. After about one year, it's starting to warp. So, I wouldn't buy one, if I were you. You say that forged is thinner than cast iron... I'd go for the cast iron. As for the heat transfer, induction ...


4

For my carbon steel knives (including my cleaver), I make very sure to wash & completely dry them after use. Especially, when I've used it on something acidic, this is especially true. I've never had a problem unless I've forgotten, or haven't completely dried it. When rust does happen in those cases, it's the only time my knife sees the scruby side of ...


3

You're perhaps missing a point about induction cooking when you bring heat transfer into the equation. Induction cooking is magnetic flux generating heat in the material, so the heat generation is virtually instantaneous; in fact, temperature "overshoot" is a bit of a problem in cast iron, so the skillet should remain on the "burner" surface for about three ...


3

For a home cook: Honing should be done before or after heavy use or once every couple of weeks, depending on how finicky you are about the blade itself. Proper honing can stave off the need for an actual grind/sharpen for years. -Honing realigns the existing edge. Just a few strops on each side of the sharpening steel. It doesn't take much. -Sharpening ...


3

If you lightly (and safely) draw your thumb from the side of the blade down towards and over the side of the knife edge, do you feel a burr? (Do this on each side, at the tip, edge and heel - do NOT drag your finger towards or parallel to the edge, drag down the side, across and away). The "burr" is caused by the very fine edge of the blade bending. If ...


3

Given that the question is "how often", I want to actually answer that question, even though some of the answers above supply more complete advice. Stainless steel knives normally want honing with a steel every 2-4 uses. This will keep them sharp. Carbon steel knives should be honed after each use. If you have been honing, you should need to sharpen ...


3

Wipe your blade along the flats with a clean, damp towel (or sponge) - set upon the counter or cutting board - frequently when cutting acidic items like onions, tomatoes or fruit. Japanese sushi chefs will have a wet kitchen towel folded into a neat pad on a lower corner of their cutting board for this purpose. When you are done with one cutting chore and ...


2

Lots of opinins but not much metallurgical knowledge.....reminds me of hotroders thinking something is better if its made out of billet instead 6061 AL (same thing). Where's that crazy smilie? Carbon steel is actually a misnomer, in many industries carbond steel is refered to a mild steel alloy that isn't stailness. What our knives are made of is a medium ...


2

Carbon steel is, as you've mentioned, a lot harder to maintain than stainless steel. However, carbon steel is a harder metal than stainless steel, meaning that it will be less vulnerable to the physical stress of everyday use and will hold an edge longer than stainless steel. As such, carbon steel knives are generally regarded as better for heavy or extended ...


2

Carbon steel is much cheaper than stainless steel although that isn't the only reason.


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I can't speak authoritatively, but I do have all three types and have had good luck with my seasonings, so I'll share what I do. For cast iron, I use solid vegetable fat exclusively (Crisco). I did the original seasoning by coating it in fat and baking in the oven. To clean it, I use salt, Crisco and a paper towel to get any food bits off. I then get the ...


2

Carbon steel knives, especially those with wooden handles have to be dried using heat. It is also best to store them in a warm place too Moisture will get into the tang/handle join, and will rust the metal away if not forcibly dried using heat. So after cleaning, dry the knife in a previously heated oven (<70°C), or warmed storage area (hot water ...


2

It looks like your pan needs a hard cleaning and a re-seasoning. I run into this about once every 2-3 months (depending on how much I use it). My tried and true method is to break some rules at this quarterly cleaning. I'll scrub with an abrasive scotch-brite, SOS Pads or similar scrubbing pad. During this time I often use about a quarter cub of baking ...


2

A new patina is vulnerable to scratches and even washing off into liquid boiling on it. I've found that even a well-established patina is vulnerable to washing off this way. If I were you, I'd would NOT bother to remove the remaining patina and start over. Rather, I would re-season the wok on top of the existing patina at least once. Actually, I'd ...


2

What stones you get depend on the current condition of the knife and how regularly you plan on sharpening it. If you are bringing the edge back on a dull knife, you will need to start with a relatively coarse stone (say, 240 - 600) to start the edge off. If the knife is still in pretty good condition, you can use something like a 1200 once a week to maintain ...


2

Steel is pretty much steel (carbon cast etc) It's the surface that's needs to be conditioned. Only buy pans with a smooth surface regardless of price. Then use metal scourers and spatulas to remove any rough spots. And then regularly heat with oil until it smokes For eggs, with a conditioned pan, pour in a layer of salt and heat until the salt discolours, ...


2

For any plain steel; carbon steel, cast iron etc, but not stainless or non-stick Remove previous bad seasonings, or on a new pan remove containments and manufacturing residues Check the pan surface for any metal protrusions, usually a quick scrape with a hard metal spatula will remove these, if not, consider other methods to remove them. You should be ...


1

It might be better for you to understand some of the factors involved, and make your own decision how to treat your pan. Below is some basic information I think you will find helpful. Background: I've successfully reclaimed old, rusty pans, fixed a few that family put in the dishwasher (TERRIBLE IDEA) and so on, and maintain my own regularly. Cast iron is ...


1

Your seasoning coat is too thick, a common error. Strip it down and start over with super thin coats of flaxseed oil, wipe the oil off with a paper towel leaving only the thinnest coat and then put in an oven at 500 for an hour. Cool and repeat 5-10 times. An oven is better than a stovetop to heat fully and evenly and up the sides. Follow the seasoning ...


1

Every 6-12 months is a usually quoted figure for mean-time-between professional sharpenings, this varies greatly depending on usage, and as others have pointed-out, what your cutting-board is made of. (Glass or stone is a No-No.) It sounds like you're a little ahead of the curve, but I wouldn't worry about too much. To find a knife-shop, I'd recommend ...


1

Your residue looks like burnt on carbohydrates to me. It can happen with both sugar and bread, but bread gives it a different shape, it chars in a crumb-like texture. Yours seems like viscous caramel flowed until it burnt on. The seasoning of a young pan is indeed quite sensitive. Don't make sticky stuff in it. What I have found to work well in new pans ...


1

In the restaurant, we just poured some coarse salt into the pan and put it on high heat (gas range). Then tossed the salt around and poured out the results. At home, with the electric range top, I put my carbon steel wok on a burner on high (it's scary, but it works) and watch as everything burns off and the carbon steel "steel" look returns. The ...



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