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11

Carbon steel is more malleable and less brittle than stainless steel. This means that it is easier to hone on a knife steel, to maintain an extremely sharp edge. Some folks feel that the benefit of that sharp edge–for example, in easily slicing tomatoes, and other very fast prep tasks–is worth the compromise of more persnickety maintenance.


7

My guess is carbon steel. It's used in a variety of cooking implements, including stuff like woks and as bread pans. A quick search suggests that carbon steel is often magnetic as you report. If it is indeed carbon steel, it benefits from seasoning and ongoing love and care similar to cast iron (lest it rust or deteriorate). Many articles on this, such as ...


6

Induction cooking works by generating an electric current in the metal cooking vessel and converting that current into heat, which requires a resistive material (i.e. a poor conductor). It's a bit of a catch-22, because you need a good conductor to actually distribute that heat. This is why some of the best induction cookware is clad metal - two layers of ...


4

One important factor in induction cooking is surface contact. This means that the base has to be sturdy. I have a carbon steel skillet similar to your option. After about one year, it's starting to warp. So, I wouldn't buy one, if I were you. You say that forged is thinner than cast iron... I'd go for the cast iron. As for the heat transfer, induction ...


4

For my carbon steel knives (including my cleaver), I make very sure to wash & completely dry them after use. Especially, when I've used it on something acidic, this is especially true. I've never had a problem unless I've forgotten, or haven't completely dried it. When rust does happen in those cases, it's the only time my knife sees the scruby side of ...


3

You're perhaps missing a point about induction cooking when you bring heat transfer into the equation. Induction cooking is magnetic flux generating heat in the material, so the heat generation is virtually instantaneous; in fact, temperature "overshoot" is a bit of a problem in cast iron, so the skillet should remain on the "burner" surface for about three ...


2

Carbon steel is, as you've mentioned, a lot harder to maintain than stainless steel. However, carbon steel is a harder metal than stainless steel, meaning that it will be less vulnerable to the physical stress of everyday use and will hold an edge longer than stainless steel. As such, carbon steel knives are generally regarded as better for heavy or extended ...


2

Carbon steel is much cheaper than stainless steel although that isn't the only reason.


2

Wipe your blade along the flats with a clean, damp towel (or sponge) - set upon the counter or cutting board - frequently when cutting acidic items like onions, tomatoes or fruit. Japanese sushi chefs will have a wet kitchen towel folded into a neat pad on a lower corner of their cutting board for this purpose. When you are done with one cutting chore and ...


2

Carbon steel knives, especially those with wooden handles have to be dried using heat. It is also best to store them in a warm place too Moisture will get into the tang/handle join, and will rust the metal away if not forcibly dried using heat. So after cleaning, dry the knife in a previously heated oven (<70°C), or warmed storage area (hot water ...


1

I can't speak authoritatively, but I do have all three types and have had good luck with my seasonings, so I'll share what I do. For cast iron, I use solid vegetable fat exclusively (Crisco). I did the original seasoning by coating it in fat and baking in the oven. To clean it, I use salt, Crisco and a paper towel to get any food bits off. I then get the ...



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