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26

If you juice your own carrots you would see how sweet your carrots actually are. When you juice a carrot, you are extracting the liquid portion (which contains the majority of the sugars) from the cellulose. Since the cellulose is somewhat flavorless — it tastes pretty much like paper pulp — you are essentially ...


26

I find when cooked, the skin retains a bit of bitterness and toughness, so in desserts, juices or when shaved/julienned , I'm inclined to peel them. In fast salads, quick application, I usually don't bother.


19

I'd like to add that you'll get additional nutrients from the peel, same as with potatoes and some other vegetables.


16

The style of cut is called julienne. True, a mandoline can make a julienne cut, as well as thin slices. However, you can also use a knife to achieve a julienne cut. First, cut the carrot into manageable lengths--2 or 3 inches. Cut a piece into 1/8 inch slices lengthwise. Stack several slices on top of one another and cut lengthwise through all layers to ...


15

And you don't have to let your carrot peelings go to waste -- use them in making vegetable stock, along with bits from other vegetables. Mushroom stems, corn cobs, potato peels, etc. can all be used in stock as long as you strain it after cooking. (I keep large plastic bags in my freezer that hold vegetable trimmings and leftovers, and when the bag gets ...


13

If your carrots are going soft after just a few days, you're not storing them properly. Mine keep for weeks and weeks. I leave them in the plastic bag, and keep that in one of the vegetable drawers in my fridge. How are you storing yours? A rubbery soft carrot isn't bad for you, it just isn't very pleasant. A slimy carrot is bad for you, don't eat it.


12

I can see this as being similar to a sweet potato pie. Best bet in that case would be to cook the carrots, then puree and mix with eggs, milk, etc. just as if it were a sweet potato or pumpkin pie. Two alternatives that come to mind would be to treat it like a fruit pie, as you say. Because of the texture of the carrots, I would grate them with the large ...


11

Cayenne pepper. I'm actually serious. I haven't tried it in carrot cake but a little capsaicin actually works well with a little sweet to offset it. Chile powder also works well in sweet things. Cardamom is my wife's favorite and so it goes into many baked goods I make. It would work and be interesting but not spicy. You can always put in a good extra ...


11

Store them in the bag in your fridge. Also, if you take the greens off they will last longer. I keep mine in the drawer at the bottom.


11

When carrots turn black, it is almost always caused by rot. I would definitely not eat them.


10

If you're talking about fast food, you can rest assured that their carrots arrive that way from the distributor, who is probably using industrial machinery to do the cutting. If you want to achieve this at home with minimal effort then your best bet is a piece of equipment called a mandoline. Normally it has a top piece that you use to pierce the vegetable ...


10

According to the History of Carrots page from the World Carrot Museum: The current yellow/orange varieties (containing carotene) through gradual selection in Europe, now form the basis of the commercial cultivars around the world, mainly through their superior taste, versatility, nutritional value and cultural acceptance. It is clear that until ...


9

Even raw, in some carrots the peel will have slightly bitter or soapy taste. Less so with very fresh, young farmer's market or homegrown varieties. Taste a little bit and see if it needs peeling.


9

I think some grated ginger root would add a wonderful touch to your pie. The fresh notes in ginger will cut through the syrupy sweetness of the apples and carrots like magic and ginger will also spike up the deep flavors of cinnamon and nutmeg.


9

You use the leaves, not the carrot themselves. I don't know for sure this is what your Russian Civil War book was talking about, but I know it works, and besides, if they were desperate enough for acorn coffee and carrot tea, I imagine they were eating the carrots. This site suggests that you might need 1/4 cup of carrot greens per 1 cup of water; you can ...


8

When it comes to spicing cakes I tend to err on the side of heavy handed as I like them to have a bit of punch. I'd go for more cinnamon definitely, and I'd also consider a good pinch or more of powdered ginger. i love the combination of cinnamon and ginger in a cake. I also like to butter my cake tin, then sprinkle a layer of sugar over the butter and ...


7

There is a relatively cheap kitchen utensil for julienne cuts. It's basically a vegetable peeler with teeth. I use it to julienne carrots and other vegetables a lot when I'm making all sorts of dishes. It takes a bit of getting used to, but is a good compromise for the amateur.


7

It's all a matter of aesthetics; peeled carrots are pretty carrots. I never peel mine unless the application calls for it (which is usually only when guests might mind the peel).


7

To get the dirt off? I'm not sure if this answer is a joke or not. All of our carrots now are local. They're nobbly and dirty. Peeling seems the easiest way to clean them.


7

There are no real doneness rules on mirepoix per se (even raw is used in some dishes). However, the recipe designer may say sweat versus sauté to give an indication of colour and flavour depth to match the 'headliner' of the dish (usually the meat). Although not a rule, you may generally see sweat used more for lighter meats like fish and fowl and sauté ...


6

I like hobodave's answer, but I'll put my .02 bucks on a negative answer: I tend to throw cooking debris in the stock pot. Onion skins, garlic peels, anything I might otherwise throw away. It's stock, right? Stock and stuffing exist to make use of leftovers. But don't do this with carrot tops, it'll make your stock taste wonky. Had to make thanksgiving ...


6

I've never had them, but they are indeed edible. Due to the high amount of potassium in them they can be bitter. The World Carrot Museum (lol) even has an entire page for carrot greens, including several recipes. Excerpt: They ARE edible and are highly nutritive, rich in protein, minerals and vitamins. The tops of the carrots are loaded with potassium ...


6

I scrub carrots with warm water and a brush, I usually don't peel them unless appearance is going to play a factor.


6

Here is a super in-depth analysis of what may cause the carrot to turn green: http://www.carrotmuseum.co.uk/turngreen.html Unfortunately, it doesn't come to any hard conclusions. It does make it clear that it's not simply pH though, as a carrot will remain green even in a 0.1 M solution of sodium hydroxide. It does provide an anecdote about a baker that ...


6

My guess is that you dropped 2lb of carrots into the water. This drops the water temperature under the boiling-simmering point. So, you're not blanching correctly. You should have taken about 3/4lb portions and blanched them successively. (Or you should have used more water on a bigger stove top.)


5

Cardamom, is used in some carrot cakes and carrot dishes as well as many Asian deserts so that would certainly go. A common paring with cardamom and lemon seems to be mixed spice so that, or any of it's components, would work as well.


5

Even though the surface may be wet, that white stuff is dehydration. It's the cells that are drying on the inside, not the surface of the carrot. It's referred to as "blushing", and it is harmless. Baby carrots are adult carrots that have been cut and polished. That polishing removes the very outer surface, making the baby carrots more susceptible to ...


4

This can commonly happen with carrots, blueberries and sunflower seeds. It's due to having a batter that's too alkaline or not having the baking soda evenly mixed throughout the batter. Anthocyanin and other food color pigments are sensitive to pH level. When they are in contact with more alkaline surroundings they will change color. While maybe a bit ...


4

The best way I've found is a specialty tupperware container designed to keep produce fresh. They have little raised trays in the bottom, and a system of vents in the lid. The combination allows air to circulate and ripening gases to escape, retains moisture, but allows water to drip below the produce to prevent spoilage from sitting in a puddle. Note ...


4

It likely depends on what shape you want to store them in. I have good luck just putting the bag in the crisper in my fridge, assuming I use them within a few weeks. Of course, it helps to shop at a grocery store that has a good turnover, and they haven't already been sitting there for 2-3 weeks (or spent a week being shipped cross-country) If you find ...



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