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22

The flavor / odor notes you're experiencing are probably sulfuric compounds. Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli and cauliflower contain sulfiric compounds that are released on cooking. That's why the stir-fried crisp-tender broccoli tastes so different from the limp overcooked olive green florets. Similar to how spicy salsa fresca grows ever spicier after ...


13

Cauliflower is from the same botanical family as mustard and horseradish. They all produce sulfuric compounds in different amounts. The odor of the sharper family members such as mustard is primarily based on those compounds. My best guess is that your cauliflower already had some less-pungent sulfuric compounds present. When sitting, they either oxidized ...


7

There's a lot of range of acceptable outcomes for this, so let me give you the parameters I work with. I generally start by mixing the cauliflower with some oil (olive oil typically; others substituted depending on the flavor profile I want) on a baking sheet, then sprinkling with salt. This part is important; if you skip the oil, you'll likely just end up ...


6

A bucket of salty water is the best way to get rid of bugs. That said, I've never had a problem with bugs in store-bought cauliflower. You need to completely submerge the head in water, so a bucket that can fit the whole head is best. Add about 2 Tbsp salt per quart warm water to get it nice and salty. Submerge the head, florets down (they float, so a ...


6

All the vegetables form the Brassica family have a bitter component to their flavour. Brassica is the family that includes cauliflower, cabbage, broccoli and Brussels sprouts. You can actually remove quite a lot of it by leeching it out in to the water, or by using salt. Remember that this means you're also losing some of the nutritional value, though that ...


5

Don't overcook your cruciferous vegetables. Or cook them with flavors that will mask it better -- garlic, olive oil, salt, hot chilies, etc. When you overcook them you release more aromatic compounds and aromas. Also, you may be sensitive to phenylthiocarbamide (PTC). Similar compounds exist in cruciferous vegetables and therefore for some people they ...


5

Yes. Just chop the cauliflower into florets, blanch for a few minutes, then run under the cold tap to cool quickly, dry thoroughly, and place in a freezer bag.


4

Roasted cauliflower is utterly awesome, and doesn't fall apart. Slice a head of cauliflower into small-to-mid-sized florets, toss with about 1T of olive oil, spice to taste (I've had successes with curry powder, powdered ancho peppers, and even cocoa powder), and roast for 30 minutes at 400F.


4

With broccoli or cauliflower, if you cook it for too long, it'll get mushy and fall apart. Boiling will exacerbate that a bit, so if you're looking for firmer cauliflower, I'd recommend steaming it, and keeping an eye on it. When the fork goes in without a lot of work, it's done.


4

If it is clear, it must be broth-based, with the cauliflower being reserved for another purpose, I would assume that a light sprinkling of perhaps less cooked cauliflower is used (rather than the cauliflower used for the broth) so that it retains its shape while sprinkled in the soup.


3

In addition to the 3 methods which MoscafJ points out, there is another one which is a particular favourite of Heston. I've used it a couple of times, and whilst its quite time consuming, it is very effective. Make your broth in the usual way - I would include the cheese as there's no opportunity really to add it later. Once its cooled freeze it in a ...


3

There are a few methods for clarifying. 1. Use the classic technique for making a consomme, which employs an egg white "raft" that captures impurities. 2. Agar clarification. See: http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/07/14/agar-clarification-made-stupid-simple-best-technique-yet/ ..., and 3. A centrifuge (an expensive proposition, but the most effective). I'...


3

I would suggest making a sort of consomme by making a broth and then passing it through a muslin or cheesecloth. Pour the majority of the liquid through then hang the solid mass over the bowl to allow the rest to drip out. The tricky bit is the cheese. You might try adding it to the main broth, or adding it before the drip through stage to see if it ...


3

You need to cover soft vegetables in egg or batter first. Normally the vege's are steamed first to actually cook, cooled, then egg washed or lightly battered and flash deep fried in hot oil just to set the thin batter Try Indian style spicy pea/chickpea flour batters


2

Coat lightly with olive oil, sprinkle w/ balsamic vinegar, liberal application of kosher salt, and fresh cracked pepper in a bowl to coat evenly. Then spread 1-layer thick on sheet pan. Roast in the oven, ~35 min 375 degF. The veg will develop a light caramelization on the outside in some places, but will have a sweeter flavor. This works well for brussel ...


1

When I buy packets of frozen veggies, it always has cauliflower in it. So, you can definitely do it. After a quick search on google and checking a couple of links, which all have the same method, here's how.


1

I like to cook a whole head cauliflower. Cut the bottom so that it is flat and sets upright in a pot, add enough salted water to steam gently for 15 to 20 minutes. There are tons of things you can do with this. A packet of dry onion soup scattered on the top of the cauliflower at the beginning will be carried into the heart of the cauliflower by the ...


1

I actually break it apart into the size you want to cook it and then let it soak in salt water (this help get into the crevices). Then, toss into a collinder and spray with a sick sprayer while shaking. I do this with similar veggies as well.


1

Tap Water is what I've used.



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