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13

Hotter water leads to more caffeine release and a more bitter flavor as it cooks the leaves. If you're serious about the taste of tea, set up four cups and pour water into them: The first boiling, the next after 30 seconds, and on down. Use a cracker between each sip; the later teas should taste slightly lighter and sweeter, and the middle two especially ...


6

Frothed milk is not essential to Masala Chai, it's normally made with plain milk; the frothed-milk version is mostly a Western variation. But I assume you like it with that little extra. You might try using a milk frother, you can get them much cheaper than the deluxe model I've linked to here. If you're very particular about your frothed milk though, it ...


6

The chai tea latte at Starbucks is made from the Tazo Chai Tea Latte concentrate. This product is available at supermarkets and online, and is mixed with milk to make a product not unlike what you have at Starbucks (minus the foam, as you pointed out). So, what are these flavors (say, if you wanted to make this from scratch)? The website mentions that the ...


5

Tea particularly requires water to be at a certain temperature, which varies by type, black tea needs to be at or very close to boiling point, as do most herbal infusions. Green tea should be a touch cooler, say 80-85C (176°-185°F). Coffee should be at the cooler temperature, more like Green Tea, as it can make the coffee become overly bitter and ...


5

You don't need anything fancy to make chai. My home made chai latte is pretty simple: boil water (as you would for ANY tea) steep the chai tea bag -OR- steep normal tea + some spices (some combination of: cinnamon, ginger, cardamom, allspice, star anise, cloves, mace or nutmeg, fennel. There are many recipes on the web if you google for "chai spices mix") ...


4

I just noticed that your recipe uses water. That's an ideal way to get tea flavor into things - you can replace it with concentrated tea. Assuming you use teabags, you should be able to steep two in that 2/3 cup of water. Tea is a fairly subtle flavor, so you may not taste it too much in the bread, but this is easy and doable with what you have! There's also ...


3

Have you tried steeping the tea in the milk? Whenever I make milk tea, I always do a 3/5th cup of whole milk, 1/5th cup of condensed milk (for sweetness) and 1/5th cup of water. I then bring the mixture of milks and water up to about 140F and steep my green tea and spices in it. This gives me a nice thick latte-like consistency and strong milk taste without ...


3

Whole spices are suggested because they retain their flavor much longer, and thus tend to have richer flavors, even if they are not fully extracted. The reason for this is that they have less surface area, so volatile flavor oils do not evaporate away as easily, and other parts of the taste do not get oxidized. They are also easier to strain out of the ...


2

That recipe actually says there are two ways you can prepare this: There are two ways to do this: throw just about everything in a pot of water and simmer, then add the milk, tea and sweetener and brew for a few minutes; or, let the spices soak overnight in the water then simmer in the morning with your tea leaves and milk. (emphasis mine) Have ...


2

It depends on how they are dried. Though if they're properly dehydrated or freeze-dried then you're just rehydrating them in the tea and they'll taste ok. Ginger: I prefer fresh ginger and find that there are some taste notes that aren't present in the dried tea, it makes more pleasant with fresh ginger, but it's more work. Chili: While I haven't tried ...


2

To avoid wasting whole spices (especially cinnamon), you can reuse it for couple of times still there will be more flavor in it.


2

If you want more milk flavor, add more condensed milk. Milk has a very subtle flavor, so even with condensed milk, two teaspoons really isn't very much. If by the time you get enough of that in, the tea flavor is too diluted, make tea concentrate the next time - steep the tea in less water.


2

Why not make it how you like it at home? Here's your best bet (and a very simple suggestion); buy a good thermos. You can get a 24 ounce one for about $30 which will work incredibly well, and last you a lifetime unlike most cooking appliances. When you properly prime a thermos with boiling water, it can keep beverages piping hot for upwards of 12 hours. This ...


1

Proctor Silex makes a 32oz hot pot that you can cook in. My husband travels a lot and always packs it. He makes oatmeal and ramen noodles in it. I don't see why you wouldn't be able to make your tea in it. We always get it from Bed, Bath, and Beyond, but I'm sure other places carry it. Plus it's only $15! ...


1

You can use ground spices if you want to. These recipes are traditional, and the people who brew them first most likely didn't consider wasting a clove or two a problem; they probably had whole bushes of the stuff growing in their back gardens. The advantages of the whole spices are (beside the fact that they store better, which BobMcGee already mentioned) ...


1

The best chai tea recipe: 750ml cold water 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger 1/4 teaspoon cinnomon 4 cardomom pods 3 teabags Bring water and spices to the boil and leave to simmer for 10 minutes Then add milk and as much sugar as you want! Full fat milk is the best but you can use half fat aswell! This makes enough for 4 mugs and i just take the teabags out and ...


1

For as much as I enjoy various espresso drinks, I must offer up that simply microwaving your milk and pseudo scalding it will bring out a lot of the richness in it. The microwaving will also change the texture of the milk somewhat. You might consider nuking a few shots of milk at different power levels and times to see what might work best for Chai Latte in ...



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