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8

Chewy means undercooked. Most of your standard "barbecue cuts" of meat contain a lot of connective tissue. This must be rendered to achieve tenderness. This goes for brisket, pork butt, and ribs, to name a few. If you are using the words "chewy" or "tough" to describe the texture of your meat, in nearly all cases it has not been cooked enough. Your ...


6

It's the smoker. I had one of these, and it is extremely flawed in design. The pan that holds the charcoal does not allow for proper air flow to the fuel. Contrast this with a Weber grill, where you put your fuel on an elevated grate with plenty of air beneath it. This Char Broil instead just has a pan that you put on a shelf. Before long your coals are ...


6

This is the method I use to smoke meat in my Weber! The basics are exactly what you see in the photo, with one more step. Start about a dozen (or in a 22.5" grill like that one, maybe 18-24) briquettes in your charcoal starter (you have one of those right? if not, go get one, they're awesome). When the coals in your starter are glowing, carefully place them ...


6

You can do anything with charcoal. One trick that we used to do when we were camping was to line a cardboard box with foil. Several metal grates or skewers would be stabbed into the box walls and a grate with a few coals hung near the bottom. We would use it to bake bread and pizzas. To control the temperature use more or fewer coals. As long as you are ...


5

I'm not sure how many steaks you're doing at once, but if you're not using the entire grill surface, stack the charcoal up. (Not sure how well it'd work with the entire grill surface and, e.g., two starters full of charcoal. With the grill open, it'll surely work.) You can cook steaks with the lid off, that'll likely lead to the coals burning faster ...


5

First off, I'd cease using paper as your tinder. While it is the cheapest way to get your charcoal started, it does create a lot of smoke and ash flying around. And avoid oil-soaked paper. This will create even more smoke (I speak from experience). I started using firestarter cubes, as they burn hotter and longer, meaning my coals are ready for cooking ...


5

Here is a good basic technique for smoking brisket. The important points are to smoke it until it reaches an internal temperature of about 160 F, then wrap in foil. The meat won't absorb any more smoke flavor at that point anyway, and the foil will protect it from drying out during the rest of the cooking process. You can add a little bit of liquid inside ...


5

Charcoal can get to 700 degrees F but in normal use you're more likely to be in the 500F range. In order to get to the higher end of charcoal's abilities there are a couple things you can do: Use natural lump charcoal, not briquettes. Lower the grill grate to within 1" of the hot coals If 1&2 don't get you enough heat, consider using the Alton Brown ...


3

The Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana, the folks who are responsible for certifying authentic Neapolitan pizza, say that "real Neapolitan pizza must be cooked in a wood-fired dome oven operating at a temperature of about 900 F." They do, however, say that it is possible to "produce a delicious pizza" in other types of ovens. Despite the fact that you ...


3

Alton Brown made a tandoor out of his kettle grill and a terra-cotta pot in Good Eats season 13, episode 17 ("The Curious Case of Curry"). It could reach very high temperatures. I obviously can't link to that video, but there are plenty of similar videos on YouTube.


3

I've got a very similar model smoker. Some things to consider: Ignore the temp gauge on the front. Buy an oven thermometer or a probe thermometer with multiple probe jacks and mount one on your grate. The front therm is placed in such a way that it won't ever read the grate temp, even if it was calibrated properly (it probably isn't). As the other answer ...


2

I've had this problem for years, but i found the perfect solution: Use a gas torche on the charcoal (i'm using a small gas torch dedicated to crème brulée, but any gas torch will do). light the top of the chimney, not the bottom Burning from the top, the black smoke is burnt by the flames and doesn't escape. The ignition of the full chimney doesn't ...


2

My recommendations would be as follows. First, buy a cooker that will do everything you need, but is priced reasonably. You will want something that fits the following criteria: Provides direct grilling capabilities. Convects heat fairly evenly, so that you can use it for low-temperature, long-time, indirect-heat cooking (what most people in the US would ...


2

On the grill, most of the heat will be coming from underneath the burgers (you already knew this) Having a gap between them will let air flow between them and increase the temperature around the meat. If they are touching, the airflow will be hindered and you won't get even cooking. When the burgers are all squashed together, you're effectively cooking ...


2

The secret to getting a thin crust is... use less dough. It's that simple. Pizza dough is flour, water, salt, yeast: there is no magic ingredient that will make it thinner. Simply use less dough per pizza. You may find that when you first shape the dough it will try and spring back. In this case, just cover it and leave it for 5 minutes for the gluten to ...


2

You can use any non-poisonous wood you like Every wood has a different heat and smoke profile. "Soft woods" like birch will generally burn very short for a short time, so OK for sausages, small meat cuts, and small vegetables, but not so good for large meat cuts, roasts, or for BBQ'ing covered for the full smoke effect as you will most likely need to ...


2

You should be able to cook on your grill using various types of wood such as hickory, mesquite, cherry, maple, apple, etc. Per Recipetips.com , birch can be used also. Birch - A softer wood, Birch is best used when grilling or smoking cuts of pork and poultry, providing a flavor similar to some varieties of maple. Birch is a softer wood and can also ...


1

As measured by a Thermoworks IR gun thermometer, I've reached the maximum range on the thermometer (approx. 1000f) on some areas of the cast-iron grates of my charcoal grill on several occasions. I used oak lump charcoal in fairly large quantities (a few layers, started with an electric coil, supplemental charcoal added after the coals were convincingly ...


1

From the phrasing of your question, it sounds like you want to put the pizza directly on the grate of your grill (without a pizza stone). If that's true, then I think the secret to using a thin crust is how you handle it as you transfer it to the grate. To have your thin crust survive, build it on a flat board (e.g. a wooden cutting board) with enough ...


1

I mostly agree with Elendil's answer: most kinds of pizza dough can be made thinner simply by stretching the dough more (and pausing to rest for a minute or two if it starts to spring back). Wetter doughs will generally stretch more easily with less "spring back," but they can also rip more easily. Which you prefer is kind of up to you. I would add three ...


1

The goal is to maximize the cool spot in the grill, so you can cook larger items slowly. I'm not aware of there being any magic to it, other than being a differently shaped fire for indirect cooking. Unlike your typical two-level fire, you don't need a hot area to sear over, so it's pushed as far to the edge as possible to create a larger cool zone. I've ...


1

I assume you light one end. The charcoal then burns along the path creating very low heat and smoke. Seems like it would work, but my worry would be the quality of the smoke. For a detailed analysis of techniques, click here: http://www.chefsteps.com/activities/barbecue-techniques


1

The One Touch is really a roasting barbecue - if you want to grill steaks with the lid off it's a bit of a compromise because without the lid you have no heated air convection (that's what kettles are designed for). Buy a Weber Q for your steaks and have the best of both worlds...


1

If you're really in need of heat - do what the venerable Alton Brown suggested and cook your steak on top of your chimney-starter. Once the charcoal in the starter is ripping hot, set the cooking grate (aka the grill) on top and go to town. Mind you, there's waaaayyy less cooking surface, and it will burn much much faster, but it should solve whatever heat ...


1

There are really three separate things that are encompassed by "American Style BBQ" plus your description. Grilling - using medium to high direct heat to cook your food. Temperatures range from 350F (175C) to 600F (315C). For steaks and pizzas, you can also get in to very high temperatures 700F + (370C), but you're going to find that impossible at an ...


1

While certainly more expensive, the ProQ smoker that you link to has the advantage of versatility. As @SAJ14SAJ points out 'grilling' and 'barbecue' are often used interchangeably. If you remove the middle section of the ProQ you can use it for grilling, if you leave it in (as pictured) you can smoke with it. Again, leave it out and put a suitably sized ...



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