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9

Generally it's things that have been prepared such that there's some sort of added preservative -- salt, sulfates, sulfides, nitrates, etc. So this would include all hams except 'fresh ham', almost all deli meats, all sausages, bacon, jerky, corned beef, etc. So yes, sausage is considered a processed meat. If you want to get all technical about what ...


8

Is this normal? Yes, it is. Sinew and other connective tissues (silverskin/fascia, ligaments) are very tough stuff; you need to remove as much as possible by hand before grinding. Sinew and ligaments are strong, whitish strands or "cables" connecting bones to muscles and to other bones, respectively. They'll be in the same place on every piece of a ...


7

On another couple of sites (Ruhlman for starters) I found the answer to this. It appears that mould is expected sometimes in the Pancetta making process and as a general rule of thumb as long as it isn't too green and furry then it should be OK. I've followed Ruhlman's advice and dabbed the spots of mould with a vinegar soaked cloth and it wiped straight off ...


6

You are about to enter the wonderful world of Charcuterie, the preserving and curing of meats. The traditional cut of beef to turned into corned beef (or pastrami, which has a similar preparation) is a well-marbled brisket. I'd imagine that a flank steak or other similar long-and-moist cuts would work out too. The curing process involves soaking the ...


4

Generally such health fears will be to do with the amount of additives in "processed meat". The use of Mechanically Reclaimed Meat (MRM) is also rather frowned upon. At the height of the media coverage of such issues in the UK, Turkey Twizzlers were singled out for particular hatred, the ingredients list almost speaks for itself. (Via: ...


4

While you might be technically correct if you were to call saucisson sec a salami, you do not make saucisson sec from commercial salami. Without knowing how the salami was produced it could be dangerous to try to do so. The pictures you posted seems to be of a cooked salami, which is significantly more perishable than its uncooked cousins. Traditionally, ...


3

I've done a lot of grinding of wild game for over 30 years and used all kinds of grinders both electric and manual. For manual grinders, try attaching a steering wheel from a car as this will give you more torque and make it ten times easier to grind. On electric grinders such as the Kitchen Aid meat grinding attachment, be sure to use the coarse grinding ...


3

I initially had problems with this on my Kitchenaid grinder attachment when I did not properly tighten the ring that holds the die and cutter together. Because they weren't mating as tightly as they should have, the sinew wasn't getting sliced, and would eventually bunch up and clog things. Assuming your grinder assembles the same way, the first thing I'd ...


3

Actually, it sounds like everything went right to me, that's a classic terrine. You simply picked the wrong recipe if you don't want fat - 1/4 of it is lard after all. When you cooked it the fat melted and got squeezed out to the sides, that's perfectly normal. If you want less fat then replace fat with gelatine which will solidify to hold it all together. ...


3

good quality sausages don't contain sodium nitrite. you can tell, because it looks like ground up meat in a sausage stuffing. the "processed" meats you're referring to have a different texture & color - think hot dog or deli-meat (pink). mechanically process is very different from chemically processed. nutritionally, you want to steer clear of the ...


3

The salt in the cure inhibits bacterial growth (particularly if the salt is one made for curing, and contains nitrates). So you should be warned that you are trading a few blood pressure points for enhanced risk of foodborne illness. Unfortunately, I think your options are rather limited -- either to keep the salt as-is, or forgo jerky in your diet.


3

The risk you have is that if you do not inhibit bacteria growths not only can spoilage occur but mold can grow as well. The Biltong I make is hung for 10 - 14 days. That is a long while for micro organism to have there way with your meat. You must take precautions This is very scary as unless you have a laboratory at hand you are playing the proverbial ...


3

You ned to get your hands on a computer fan (they are designed to run 24hrs a day). I simply mounted one of these inside wall of my curing chamber (down low - as wet air drops), cut a hole in the wall of the fridge with a hole saw - which allows the fan to exhaust the moist air from within the curing chamber. I also cut a similar sized hole at the top of ...


2

Having myself originally written most of the Wikipedia article on Tasso (which isn't really that extensive anyways), I feel justified paraphrasing it here: Tasso ham is a specialty of Cajun cuisine. It is not a true ham, since it is made from the front shoulder, rather than the rear leg, of a pig. The front shoulder is a fatty and well-exercised (thus very ...


2

I have a vent in my curing chamber that's an old refrigerator converted over.I used a metal dryer vent and caulked the perimeter once installed, i also leave the metal flap open a bit with a magnet. This allows circulation of air inside of the chamber via the fan. I have a steady 58 degrees with 70% RH.


2

Well, at least here in germany it really is common to make liverwurst with beef liver (or more often and expensive: calf liver). So go ahead - you really won't regret it! Taken the percentage of actual liver in liverwurst you won't taste any difference, though I'd say beef liver tastes better.


2

I am using a frost-free freezer (large) and at the moment am drying 7kg. I have a temp controller which works perfectly, but as the weather changes I get a lot of variation. A humidistat controls a humidifier, so have no trouble in keeping the humidity up, which I like to in the early stages. The problem arises overnight when the ambient temp is lower than ...


2

The mould is an important part of the curing process and as a general rule, as long as the mould is white and the meat doesn't smell 'bad' in any way, your pancetta will be doing what it's meant to. Sorry, I realise 'bad' might be objective, but generally very obvious to tell off meat with curing. If the mould is white, speckled with black, or mostly black, ...


2

While the salt does inhibit bacterial growth, it is possible to safely make jerky in a dehydrator without it if you are careful about the temperature, moisture, and dehydrating time. There is more information on this thread.


2

A probable answer is that maybe it wasn't intended to be firm at all. There are different types of liverwurst in Germany. The most commonly sold one is indeed firm, but from its texture, I'd guess that it has gelatin added. It is more rubbery than the naturaly gelled meats I've eaten. But there is no guarantee that your recipe was intended for this kind. ...


1

I've made pancetta many times. When rolling, I just tie with a string. Traditionally, it is just tied off. Personally, I prefer the results when I just hang it without rolling...poke a hole, loop a string, hang...but that is just personal preference. The only downside I can see to the cheese cloth, is that it might slightly slow the drying process. Other ...


1

Terrines almost always shrink. The water in the ingredients evaporates out, so the volume reduces - there's nothing you can do about that. However, not filling the mould will have exacerbated the problem. All terrine recipes are careful to state that the mould should be filled - yours even says to mound it slightly. It also says to use caul fat to help it ...


1

Differences are mainly a question of origin. Speck comes from Tyrol (it actually means "bacon" in german, which is misleading) and is prepared with a specific blend of spices, usually including juniper, Jamon Serrano from Spain (it means "mountain ham" in spanish) and is a dry-cured ham, and prosciutto just means "ham" in italian. There are plenty of ...


1

This question is almost entirely a duplicate of this one on corned beef, sodium nitrite and Tender Quick.. Please see the answers for that question. The only thing not covered in that question are the proportions of salt, sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate in Tender Quick. You would need to calculate those ratios, and compare them with the ratios in pink ...


1

Generally they put those chemicals in the meat to enhance the flavour (salt / sodium) and so it stays on the self longer - nitrates (prevent bacteria from growing) Long as you look at the packaging and look for high levels of meat 70 - 80% they will need put less salt in for flavour. but they will always need put the preservatives or it wont keep for very ...


1

I get my sausages from a great butcher, and I'm certain that all the "processing" done to them is benign. "Processing" in this case entails mincing, mixing with breadcrumbs, spices etc. and putting in the skins. They will be high in fat -- because it's pork and it won't be from the leanest part of the pig, and because the fat makes for moist delicious ...



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