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35

There are several main reasons, historically: Cows, sheep and goats have udders, and can be milked by hand into a bucket. Pigs (or cats, or humans for that matter) have nipples, where you need to suck the milk out. Consider that most of the cheese in the world was invented before machinery was able to create a vacuum, this means that the only option would ...


24

The rind of Brie is Penicillium Camemberti it's a completely harmless fungus which gives brie its taste. You can eat it, or not, up to you: you are supposed to. If it smells very strongly of ammonia the cheese is just a bit too ripe but it won't do you any harm.


22

They are both soft-ripened cheese, and there are certainly many similarities, but they are by no means the same. Camembert is aged at least 3 weeks; Brie may be aged as little as 1 week. Brie is generally drained for 18 hours; Camembert is drained for 48 hours. Brie may be salted before aging; Camembert is not. Brie is more often pasteurized than Camembert ...


19

This is a recipe that we used for the concierge lounge when I was a chef in the main kitchen of the Disney's Grand Floridian Resort & Spa: Paneer 5 cups whole milk 2 tablespoons lemon juice Bring the milk to a boil, add the lemon juice so that the milk separates into the curds and whey. Add a bit more lemon juice if necessary. Let set for approx. ...


15

Making Mozzarella is not fantastically difficult, but certain things during the process are critical, probably the most important is temperature. If it's your first time making cheese, you might find the buying a 'starter kit' the easiest way to get up and running. These will provide you with all the important items you needm such as rennet. If you feel ...


11

I've not been able to use store bought cheese cloth more than twice and then only if I used it gently. And I'm not gentle on the stuff. I use it for cheese making regularly as well as juicing and random filtering. I gave up on normal cheese cloth because it is too fragile and way too expensive for what it was. I now use instead a tightly woven polyester ...


10

Any kind of milk should be good. Homogenized milk doesn't make any difference; you make curds because you add a food acid. Citric acid is contained in lemons; you can also use vinegar, or even yogurt. Paneer is typical of countries like India (northern India), Pakistan, and Bangladesh. All those countries use different methods to obtain paneer. For example, ...


9

The easiest way where I live to get rennet is to buy Junket tablets at the grocery store. If they have it it's near the ice cream toppings. You can buy it online from the company. It's very cheap and although not 100% pure rennet it works just fine for the variety of cheeses I have made. The box of tablets comes with reliable recipes for a variety of cheeses ...


8

Yogurt whey cannot be used to make ricotta. With most cheeses, including mozzarella, the milk isn't boiled. The casein proteins are bound up with some of the lactose and almost all the fat to make the curd. The whey for such cheeses contains the rest of the lactose, tons of vitamin B, and almost all the albumin. The albumin proteins are water soluble when ...


7

It is mostly about how much water is left in the curd- how hard and long you press it, aging, and sometimes microbial growth. Soft cheeses like cream cheese are only barely pressed. Fresh soft cheeses like queso fresco and paneer aren't even pressed at all- just hung to dry. Cheddar is pressed firmly and aged for a relatively short time. Cheeses like ...


7

Harold McGee, in On Food and Cooking, is very detailed in his explanation of how cheese "works". He describes three stages. In the first stage, lactic acid bacteria convert milk sugar into lactic acid. In the second stage, which overlaps with the first one, rennet (an extract of calf stomach - or, to be more precise, chymosin, a protein found in this ...


7

The use of vinegar in the cheese production is irrelevant. Cheese made with the acid from vinegar or cheese made with the acid from a bacterial culture should be similar. The difference is in how high the milk was heated when the cheese was made. The albumin in milk denatures and precipitates at about boiling temperatures. If the milk was boiled before the ...


6

Pulse posted a recipe, and while I've made ricotta using the yogurt/vinegar combo before, I find you get better tasting ricotta with this simple recipe: 1 liter whole fat milk 1/4 liter sour milk/buttermilk (2%+ fat) Large pinch of salt Bring the milk, buttermilk and salt to a simmer, stirring occasionally. Simmer for a few minutes, until the milk ...


6

Not having made cottage cheese before, I'm unsure of what effect it has on the quantity produced. However, I do know that it has a significant effect on the flavor of the finished product. Just like skim milk tastes blander than whole milk, the same applies to cheese. When you buy non/low-fat cottage cheese in the supermarket you'll notice they add sugar to ...


6

Ricotta would be a good first cheese to make. It is a fresh cheese so doesn't need any aging, you can make a batch in all of about 30 minutes with very simple ingredients and the taste difference with store bought is spectacular. There is a question that has several answers with ricotta cheese recipes (including one I've used) ...


6

As daniel suggests, cost of production is the main issue. But it is possible. In fact, recently in the UK a restaurant served human breast milk ice cream [Source] and I don't see any reason why we couldn't have cheeses made from human milk. There are even cheeses* that are made without any milk for vegans [Source], and it sounds absolutely delicious ...


5

I'd say the buttermilk was a necessary ingredient that you shouldn't have left out. Milk usually needs to be inoculated with some kind of culture before your rennet (or lemon juice in this case) will successfully curdle it. Buttermilk is cultured (which means it has an active colony of beneficial bacteria), and would work well to inoculate your goat milk. ...


5

How are you pressing the cheese? Are you using a cheese press? I have done some traditional cheese making and it does take a lot of force. Not quite to the point of creating an atomic reaction though. For something simple, look for a Dutch press. It is a lever based press that helps. A screw press can also work.


5

yes it is definitely a way because we are also doing at home. In my interpretation there are two kind of túró. One is created from milk, this one tastes sweet. The another is created from sheep cheese, and this one is a bit spicy. The second one is traditional food of székely's. In which one you are interrested? Update. Ok, here you go, I asked my ...


5

You can make ricotta at home and it's not that difficult. You don't need anything that may be hard to find. Here's a really simple recipe: http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/homemade_ricotta_cheese/ As a substitute, you have a few options. One would be cottage cheese. The problem is it tends to be a bit watery, so dump a pot or two into some fine ...


5

ehow is not a source of reliable information. It is a content farm, and therefore most of it's articles are effectively screen scraped (either by hand or using 'bots). People get paid to make content, but there is no peer review process There are plenty of other sources on the web including this site :-) that explain the cheese curd (paneer) process, and ...


5

The cheeses that just plain won't work in the fridge are those that make use of bacteria or mold with "special needs". Swiss, camembert, and any blue cheese come to mind. The bacteria that produce the holes in Swiss need specific, relatively warm, temps for specific times. Likewise the molds on the rinds or through blue cheeses need warmer but still cooler ...


5

The other answers refer to products that are cheese-flavored fudges or cream cheeses blending with cocoa. Your question seems like it is asking about making a cocoa flavored cheese from scratch. I have not tried chocolate in particular but I have been experimenting with flavoring cheese (and tofu) and have some data points that might be helpful. I have ...


4

I use whole milk, which usually is vitamin D fortified. Ordinary whole milk also works. I bring about 2.5 litres ("liters" in the US) milk to a boil, switch off the flame, and then add about 2–3 tbsp ordinary vinegar. As soon as milk curdles, I pour the contents into a cheese cloth-lined colander. Next, I squeeze out all the water from the curdled solids and ...


4

The real difference is the surface area to volume ratio. While both come in different sizes, Brie is generally less thick compared to a Camembert of the same diameter. This results in a different breakdown in the middle of the cheese. The enzymes that break down the cheese get much further into the middle (usually all the way) in a Brie. In many ...


4

I have the same problem and went through 3 different brands of milk, thinking they were UHT. However, after some experimentation I determined what I was doing wrong. In my case, after cutting the curd, and while the water was heating back up to 105, we were stirring too much. The key is very slow gentle movement. Just enough to slightly move the curds, ...


4

The resultant cheese in your first link will be a fresh, soft cheese, nothing like either of the Parmesan or cheddar cheeses mentioned in your second link. It is also an acid-based cheese, not a made with either rennet or bacterial cultures as are most other cheeses. Parmesan is a very long aged cheese. Cheddar is a... well... cheddared cheese (cheddaring ...


3

I suspect it depends what kind of cheese the whey came from. Whey has all of the water soluble components of the milk. It loses the casein and fat. How much of the albumin and lactose it loses depends on the cheese. If the milk was heated enough (190F I believe) then the albumin will denature and not be in the whey. If the cheese was acidified with a ...


3

There seem to be two schools of thought on making túró: one method just drains the whey from "slept milk" (aludttej), while another cooks the sour milk (on very low heat) first, then drains it. If you choose the cooked method, avoid stirring - you want to give the proteins a chance to coagulate. In either case, the trick tends to be finding milk that will ...



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