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45

Yes, you can save it and add it to soups such as Minestrone for additional flavor. Once the soup is done, remove and discard the rind. For extended storage, keep it in a bag in the freezer until you have need for it.


32

I think it would depend on the cheese. For a reasonably hard cheese, like cheddar, I have done it, and never gotten sick (your results may vary). If it's pre-grated, then I would not touch it anymore. For a softer cheese, like a brie, I would not risk it.


32

Cheese is not made from "rotten" milk, let me clarify that. Rotting is an uncontrolled process in which bacteria, molds and other life forms colonize milk, eat it, release waste into it and die. The resulting, rather unpredictable, crud we call rotten (or more precisely spoiled) milk. Most cheese is the product of highly controlled action by bacteria that ...


27

I usually freeze mozzarella and then grate it (longer the better, unless you are in a hurry, then 20 minutes or so works OK). This works very well. Other soft cheeses, such as those meant to be eaten at room temp, brie, for example, I wouldn't freeze... Of course, I don't think many of us are grating brie anyway.


24

Cheap cheese is, as others have explained, cheap for a reason. You should be able to find old/extra old (AKA "sharp"/"extra sharp") cheddar cheese in the cheap section, which makes a reasonably good starting point - this cheese does have some flavour. Daniel says he simmers the milk; I generally start with evaporated milk, which is even more economical ...


24

The rind of Brie is Penicillium Camemberti it's a completely harmless fungus which gives brie its taste. You can eat it, or not, up to you: you are supposed to. If it smells very strongly of ammonia the cheese is just a bit too ripe but it won't do you any harm.


22

They are both soft-ripened cheese, and there are certainly many similarities, but they are by no means the same. Camembert is aged at least 3 weeks; Brie may be aged as little as 1 week. Brie is generally drained for 18 hours; Camembert is drained for 48 hours. Brie may be salted before aging; Camembert is not. Brie is more often pasteurized than Camembert ...


21

Could be an unfinished roux (the butter, flour mixture). But most likely it's because the cheese was heated too quickly or too much, causing the protein to clump up. Suggestions: Melt with less heat Use a double boiler (to reduce hot spots within the pan) Toss the shredded cheddar with cornstarch first (starch helps reduce clumping) Add cheese in smaller ...


20

Those are called "Eyes" by cheese makers. The appear when bacteria convert lactic acid into propionic acid and carbon dioxide or metabolise citrate. These bacteria occur in diary product, tough they can also be added to the curd to get the characteristic eyes. See for example: Propionibacterium freudenreichii.


19

This is a recipe that we used for the concierge lounge when I was a chef in the main kitchen of the Disney's Grand Floridian Resort & Spa: Paneer 5 cups whole milk 2 tablespoons lemon juice Bring the milk to a boil, add the lemon juice so that the milk separates into the curds and whey. Add a bit more lemon juice if necessary. Let set for approx. ...


19

Having worked for some time as a cheesemonger, I found that Bulgarian Feta was generally saltier and more assertive than many Greek fetas. I also found the texture to be a bit grainier with the Bulgarian feta and a bit more dense. However, my experiences are limited in that while I sold five different Greek fetas, I only sold one Bulgarian Feta. I'll also ...


19

To quote On Food and Cooking (Harold McGee), page 63, about crystals in Cheddar: In aged Cheddar, there are often crystals of calcium lactate, formed when ripening bacteria convert the usual form of lactic acid into its less soluble mirror ("D") image. In blue cheeses: The white crystals often visible against the blue mold of a Roquefort, ...


17

I found a highly rated mascarpone cheese substitute recipe on food.com. I haven't personally tried it, but it's highly rated on that site, and is ridiculously simple. 1 16 oz block of cream cheese 1/2 cup sour cream 1/4 cup heavy whipping cream Blend until smooth Try it and let us know? :)


16

I'm not sure that's the right way to go about this. There are tons and tons of types of cheeses. I'm not sure you'll find a good list of all substitutes because it will be too big to put together. Instead, I think you need to learn about the types of cheese so that you can make an informed decision. Is a cheese blue, sharp, creamy, hard, soft? How does it ...


16

Pizza hut uses skim milk mozzarella on it's pizza, at least in the USA. Not sure what they use in other countries, but I would imagine it is still the same. Skim milk mozzarella is extremely stretchy, but loses a little on the flavor end. More expensive pizzerias normally spring for the full fat mozzarella cheese. Dominos uses a mix of cheese, made up of ...


15

Making Mozzarella is not fantastically difficult, but certain things during the process are critical, probably the most important is temperature. If it's your first time making cheese, you might find the buying a 'starter kit' the easiest way to get up and running. These will provide you with all the important items you needm such as rennet. If you feel ...


15

Save it! In addition to minestrone and other soups, it also works well to flavor sauces -my favorite use is in the mushroom mixture for chicken marsala.


14

I like it fine; on good cheeses it seems like that outer layer has a lot of interesting flavor. I love it when at things like industry conference buffets thrown by giant rich corporations the good (or great) brie rinds gets mostly left behind for me :-) If you don't like the taste of it, don't eat it. I suggest adopting that policy as a general rule. You ...


14

Normal cheese melts like that. It is made of proteins, fats, and water, and these separate when they are heated. For dipping, you need processed cheese. It has additives which keep the fat, fluid and solids mixed in a smooth mass. Also, it really helps to use very slow and even heat. This is the easy option. If you want to do it "for real", without ...


12

It's a personal preference. It's certainly edible, and it won't hurt you. I find the texture a little weird. Generally you can eat the rind of almost any cheese. However, make sure you're not mistaking a wax coating for rind.


12

Vegetables (broccoli, mushrooms, cubed/baby potatoes, peppers, celery, cauliflower) Meat (cubed ham, pepperoni, sausages) Other kinds of bread (pita, chunks of soft pretzels, garlic bread, saltines) Tomatoes Basically, anything that is delicious with cheese and can be speared with a stick is fair game :)


12

Ignore the purists. If it's got cheese in it, and you're grilling it, it's grilled cheese. The problem is this: your cold ingredients are keeping the cheese from properly melting through. The cheese is what binds the whole thing together. If there is not enough cheese, or if the cheese hasn't transitioned completely to gooey deliciousness, the sandwich is ...


12

Both contain protein. The amount varies by the type for cheese, although it appears to be about 20% - 35%. All dairy contains protein. There may also be milk or cream in the sauce, which would also be a contributing ingredient. Pasta also contains protein, but less than cheese. The amount depends on the type of flour used. It will also increase if egg is ...


12

Milder cheddars are for melting. They get used in things such as grilled cheese sandwiches, grating into chili, nachos, or in quesadillas. In these uses, they don't need the full-bodied flavor of a sharp cheddar, but they do need to melt down into soft, gooey, creamy deliciousness. Sharper cheddars are for flavor. I commonly see them in sandwiches, ...


11

By the wording of the question, I'm pretty sure you're using one of those pyramidal graters or a "sheet" grater. That's great for getting the "bulk", but if you want to grate a small amount of cheese (or the last bit of a large amount, if you don't want to just eat it) then you really need to get yourself a rotary grater. They're more commonly used for ...


11

As Nick said, I wouldn't recommend it for soft cheese... the process of cutting off the mold can push some nasty bacteria into the inside. I've also never got sick from doing this. Now if you're talking about some piece of cheese that has questionable provenance (been in your student accommodation fridge for 6 months)... well that may be different :)


11

Hard cheeses (e.g. parmesan) will typically last several months in the refrigerator once removed from the packaging. The larger the chunk, the longer it will last. If mold forms on the outside, simply cut it off and continue using. There is no reason to throw-away good parmesan.


11

Usually a cheese tasting would have more variety in terms of texture and flavour and you'd progress from the mild to the stronger. However, if your goal is to compare a lot of similar cheeses to contrast with each other, you'll need to have more palate cleansing and balancing in between each cheese. A lot of the cheeses that you're considering are aged ...


11

Gorgonzola, like any other blue cheese, is supposed to have mold. It should have blue mold radiating from "veins" through the middle, like so: Normally this pre-existing mold actually helps prevent other molds from growing, but if you see more than one type of mold (especially a different colour like green or black), then you should throw it out, because ...


11

Continuing to age a "nice" block of Parmesan is not going to do anything for you. It has already aged for over year and has changed pretty much all it's going to. Similarly aging cheap, canned, Parmesan-like product that is aged only a month to cut costs will also not be good because it has too much surface area and will oxidize. It isn't very good to start ...



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